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Looking for a decent gaming laptop for college - Page 2

post #11 of 18
Quote:
1366x768 screen is not "a problem", but it's little low for 15.6" screen. However, it's a matter of taste + in this resolution, your games will run faster and you'll be able to use higher settings and filters (although personally I'd prefer higher resolution).
Taste is a factor, but that isn't all of it. It's not like some 50/50 thing where for half of people 1366x768 is better and for the other half 1920x1080 is better. Not that you're portraying it like that, but I've known many people who do attempt to portray the issue as if 15.6" 1366x768 and 15.6" 1920x1080 are "equally good" options-- which isn't true.

An important issue other than the resolution difference itself is quality: 15.6" 1366x768 displays, like many low-end laptop displays, tend to have very poor image quality due to low contrast. But on the contrary, most 15.6" 1920x1080 displays tend to have excellent contrast. They're two completely different classes of displays. There are exceptions to this, but the majority of 15.6" 1366x768 and 1920x1080 displays support this theory.

And the fairly common notion that you should choose a lower resolution in order to improve game performance is a myth, and is one of the worst misconceptions in computer purchasing. Game performance should not be a reason to choose a 15.6" 1366x768 display instead of a 15.6" 1920x1080 display. For one thing, you can always make up for drops in performance associated with higher resolutions by lowering to a non-native resolution, but you cannot as easily make up for the limits imposed on multitasking by a lower resolution. In addition, despite the fact that running in a non-native resolution causes blur, games will still tend to look better running in a non-native resolution on a 15.6" 1920x1080 display than they would look running in native resolution on a 15.6" 1366x768 display, because of the sheer difference between the image quality that typically exists between these two types of displays.

The same thing applies between 17.3" 1600x900 and 17.3" 1920x1080 displays.


For $693, you can get the HP DV6z-7000 with the Radeon 7730M and the 1920x1080 display. This is one of the best values available for under $800 that will allow you to get a decent GPU and a decent display.

HP DV6z (A8-4500M, AMD Radeon 7730M, 15.6" 1920x1080 matte display) - $693 + tax after coupon code NBQ1148
- HP® Official Store — Buy and Customize your dv6 and dv6z-7000 series PC direct from HP
- Don't downgrade the GPU to Integrated graphics if game performance is important to you.
- Don't downgrade the display to 1366x768 for reasons unrelated to eyesight. The HP DV6 generally should not be bought in any configuration that includes the default 1366x768 display. 1366x768 resolution in a 15.6" display makes things onscreen large, and 15.6" displays that have 1366x768 resolution tend to have very poor image quality due to low contrast.
- Some worthwhile upgrades: Larger or faster HDD, Backlit keyboard.
- Remember to apply coupon code NBQ1148
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Again, thanks for all of your guys' input. I think I'm pretty set on a 15.6'' screen now for portability. I found this laptop with a GT 650M.

http://www.xoticpc.com/force-16ga-msi-16ga-p-4707.html

Just note the 1920x1080 resolution, 4 GB RAM, and i5-2450M CPU. I know it's pushing my budget a bit but I feel it may be worth it for the GT 650M, so correct me if I'm wrong. Also, I just noticed it doesn't come with an OS installed so I'll have to throw down another $80 or so for Windows 7 Home Premium.
post #13 of 18
www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/829664-REG/Acer_LX_RNA02_008_Aspire_7750_AS7750_6458_17_3_.html

i5-2430m

+

hd 6850m 1gb gddr5


has a 1600x900 17.3 inch display
{6850m= gt640m}

the price: 579.99!!!!!
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post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by edit1754 View Post

Taste is a factor, but that isn't all of it. It's not like some 50/50 thing where for half of people 1366x768 is better and for the other half 1920x1080 is better. Not that you're portraying it like that, but I've known many people who do attempt to portray the issue as if 15.6" 1366x768 and 15.6" 1920x1080 are "equally good" options-- which isn't true.
An important issue other than the resolution difference itself is quality: 15.6" 1366x768 displays, like many low-end laptop displays, tend to have very poor image quality due to low contrast. But on the contrary, most 15.6" 1920x1080 displays tend to have excellent contrast. They're two completely different classes of displays. There are exceptions to this, but the majority of 15.6" 1366x768 and 1920x1080 displays support this theory.
And the fairly common notion that you should choose a lower resolution in order to improve game performance is a myth, and is one of the worst misconceptions in computer purchasing. Game performance should not be a reason to choose a 15.6" 1366x768 display instead of a 15.6" 1920x1080 display. For one thing, you can always make up for drops in performance associated with higher resolutions by lowering to a non-native resolution, but you cannot as easily make up for the limits imposed on multitasking by a lower resolution. In addition, despite the fact that running in a non-native resolution causes blur, games will still tend to look better running in a non-native resolution on a 15.6" 1920x1080 display than they would look running in native resolution on a 15.6" 1366x768 display, because of the sheer difference between the image quality that typically exists between these two types of displays.
The same thing applies between 17.3" 1600x900 and 17.3" 1920x1080 displays.
For $693, you can get the HP DV6z-7000 with the Radeon 7730M and the 1920x1080 display. This is one of the best values available for under $800 that will allow you to get a decent GPU and a decent display.
HP DV6z (A8-4500M, AMD Radeon 7730M, 15.6" 1920x1080 matte display) - $693 + tax after coupon code NBQ1148
- HP® Official Store — Buy and Customize your dv6 and dv6z-7000 series PC direct from HP
- Don't downgrade the GPU to Integrated graphics if game performance is important to you.
- Don't downgrade the display to 1366x768 for reasons unrelated to eyesight. The HP DV6 generally should not be bought in any configuration that includes the default 1366x768 display. 1366x768 resolution in a 15.6" display makes things onscreen large, and 15.6" displays that have 1366x768 resolution tend to have very poor image quality due to low contrast.
- Some worthwhile upgrades: Larger or faster HDD, Backlit keyboard.
- Remember to apply coupon code NBQ1148

1. Yes, they tend to put a higher quality screen when using a FullHD panel. That's true and I usually point that out. thanks

2. Not true. lowering resolution to a non-native one is not like having a native lower resolution. pixels are not scalable in current LCD monitors and the picture seem unnatural.

3. You suggested the dv6z and I suggested the dv6t-7000, with GT 650M, Intel I5 (ivy bridge, but that doesn't matter), 6GB DDR3 and FullHD screen for 812$ with the coupon. It will be generally much faster for gaming.
However, it will be better if the OP will write which games she is interested in
post #15 of 18
Lowering to a non-native resolution causes blur. But running games in a non-native resolution on a good quality display tends to look better than running games in native resolution on a poor quality display. That's what I'm getting at. I also copy+pasted that entire paragraph from a couple of posts of mine on other forums, so a few things may be slightly out of context.

Just now realized that the coupon does in fact work for the DV6t. One of the previously available DV6t coupon codes brought the price of the following configuration down to a non-noteworthy $924, and I hadn't tried any new coupon codes since then.
Quote:
HP DV6t (i5-3210M, NVIDIA GT 650M, 15.6" 1920x1080 matte display) - $824 + tax after coupon code NBQ1148
- Saved Configuration: http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/load_configuration.do?destination=review&config_id=7338089
- Don't downgrade the display from 1920x1080 to 1366x768. The HP DV6 should not be bought in any configuration that includes the default 1366x768 display option, unless its larger text is required for eyesight-related reasons. 1366x768 resolution in a 15.6" display makes things onscreen large, and 15.6" displays that have 1366x768 resolution tend to have very poor image quality due to low contrast.
- Don't downgrade the GPU to the GT 630M or to Integrated graphics if game performance is important to you, because the GT 650M is considerably faster.
- You could more than likely get away with downgrading the CPU to a Core i3, since most games will be bottlenecked by the GT 650M before being bottlenecked by the CPU. Doing so will make the price $776 + tax
- The backlit keyboard upgrade is worth considering.

Edited by edit1754 - 7/17/12 at 3:06pm
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm a guy but thanks anyway. The games I'd be interested in playing are Starcraft 2, Diablo 3, various MMORPGs, and possibly FPS games like CoD or BF.

EDIT: That deal on the dv6 is very enticing but again I'm worried about overheating issues. With that hardware I feel i can expect decent performance for a laptop, but none of that matters if the laptop overheats. I've heard many times that HP is not known for their laptop cooling. Coming from using my own dv6-2190 for 3 years, I know the CPU only runs at the base speed and not the Turbo-Boost speed even when running an intense game or using benchmark/stress tests.
Edited by Skyrocketing - 7/17/12 at 3:26pm
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Are the temperature and noise ratings on the HP website? If so, where? If not, where can I find them?
post #18 of 18
Google some reviews.
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