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GTX 670

post #1 of 9
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Hello. I haven't been asking something here in a while, but now I'm buying a new GPU and.. I need some opinions.

I'm planning on getting a GTX 670. The problem is, it's the top of my money. That's all I can give for a GPU. That's OK, I'll give them anyways, but I have a "SAGA II 500W PSU". I read a lot of things in the internet and they all say that minimum PSU needed is 500W. But is it 500W effective? Because PSUs seem to not be 100% effective and I don't know if this SAGA II 500 will be enough. Some PSU calculators say that I won't need more than 390W, but in Nvidia's site it clearly says "Minimum PSU Wattage: 500W".

Sooo, I wanted to ask what do you guys think. Will it be enough to be exactly on the redline - 500W? Or I should get a gtx 570 + PSU?
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post #2 of 9
Whatever you do don't get a 570 since it uses more power. If you are concerned that 600w isn't enough for the 670 you can wait for the 660ti or look into AMD's current gen offerings.
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post #3 of 9
What resolution are you gaming at?

Which games are you most concerned with re: performance?

I too highly suggest waiting for at least reviews of the GTX660ti which may well be the best option for you, but my gut tells me (not knowing any specifics about your specific PSU) that you should be fine with a 670, especially if you're not overclocking (*much*).

A 670 is the best option for a person in your position, assuming you're gaming @ 1080p or less. However if your PSU is not the greatest, then the next best GPU to allow you the room to get a good PSU is probably going to be an AMD 7870 or GTX660ti, unless you can get a 7950 and PSU both on sale inside your budget.
Edited by willibj - 8/5/12 at 5:39pm
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by willibj View Post

What resolution are you gaming at?
Which games are you most concerned with re: performance?
I too highly suggest waiting for at least reviews of the GTX660ti which may well be the best option for you, but my gut tells me (not knowing any specifics about your specific PSU) that you should be fine with a 670, especially if you're not overclocking (*much*).
It is the best option for a person in your position, assuming you're gaming @ 1080p or less.

I'm playing at 1080p and I'm still not sure what games to play after I buy it. With the current GPU I can't play any games so I want to play a LOT of games now cuz I've missed a lot. But probably I won't play any of the most heaviest games except Metro 2033. I really want to try that!

As for waiting, I can't. I'll have the money for the next week and I have to buy next week. After that - they're gone. Upgrading PC is not the only thing that I'll have to do with them so if I don't do it at the beginning - it may become one of the thing I "had" to do.

Anyways, the other thing I'm thinking about is that when I buy this card, I'll use it till it dies. I'm not rich, I'm collecting money for PCs for years. My current GPU is.. I don't really remember but it's 4 or 5 years old.

As for overclocking *much*. I don't overclock my parts. I find it useless. I don't do benchmarks, I just play games in my free time. So I bought an i7 and prolly a GTX 670 with the thing on my mind that they'll die before it they can't take the new games (which hopefully is at least 3-4 years ahead).

Another thing I read on the internet is that the GTX 570 and 580 (actually their chip) has some problems. I couldn't find what problems but I read that they have problems which is making me worried because I plan to keep the card for long. Warrantly is probably only 2 years so if they have such problems, they may eat my money.. =/


Thanks!
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post #5 of 9
Overclocking does legitimately help your gaming experience, for what it's worth. It can raise your minimum frames preventing stuttering, and raise the power output allowing smoother gameplay and more graphical fidelity, enhancing the immersion, experience and accuracy.

Given your disinterest in overclocking and desire to use for multiple years, then the GTX670 is the only choice, and from what I can find out about your PSU, you should be gravy mate.Get the 670 and call it a day.

*I say the 670 is the only choice because AMD cards have massive overclocking headroom and their best performance and value for money comes through easy and safe overclocking. The 7950 has been known to overclock by up to 50% on the core and 30% on the memory, which turns it into an entirely different beast. It simply cannot be stated to be an irrelevant difference - overclocking here is essential, and not doing so is absurd and frankly, stupid. Really the same can be said about any component. At the very least, one should find the max stable overclock at stock volts and run that without a shred of danger or concern, maximizing efficiency per watt for the consumer. Anyway and back on topic, the 670 will give you likely the best gaming experience for the longest out of the cards available, in the most efficient way, and without overclocking required. It's your best choice.
Edited by willibj - 8/5/12 at 6:05pm
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by willibj View Post

Overclocking does legitimately help your gaming experience, for what it's worth. It can raise your minimum frames preventing stuttering, and raise the power output allowing smoother gameplay and more graphical fidelity, enhancing the immersion, experience and accuracy.
Given your disinterest in overclocking and desire to use for multiple years, then the GTX670 is the only choice, and from what I can find out about your PSU, you should be gravy mate.Get the 670 and call it a day.
*I say the 670 is the only choice because AMD cards have massive overclocking headroom and their best performance and value for money comes through easy and safe overclocking. The 7950 has been known to overclock by up to 50% on the core and 30% on the memory, which turns it into an entirely different beast. It simply cannot be stated to be an irrelevant difference - overclocking here is essential, and not doing so is absurd and frankly, stupid. Really the same can be said about any component. At the very least, one should find the max stable overclock at stock volts and run that without a shred of danger or concern, maximizing efficiency per watt for the consumer. Anyway and back on topic, the 670 will give you likely the best gaming experience for the longest out of the cards available, in the most efficient way, and without overclocking required. It's your best choice.


Thanks a lot!

As for the AMD Cards. I can't afford one. The person I'm buying from sells over 20% cheaper than everyone else, but he doesn't have any ATI cards. Which means I'll be paying more to get an ATI card. As for the overclock, I don't overclock because I have different thinking. I'm scared to do it. I've done it to my current GPU but that was a big bravery for me. I'm usually thinking "Hmm.. This game lags.. What can I do. Overclock the GPU? Let's just turn off the anti aliasing." As far as I know, I can kill the card when overclocking it. I clocked my 9600gt with 50-80mhz core and around the same - shader and it already started making dots on my screen. I don't have voltage control tho. Anyways, someday if I have to do it - I'll do it. But at this point, wouldn't both 570 and 670 run all games on MAX? smile.gif

Oh, also I forgot to say that I do Fraps quite a lot. And I broadcast. I mean, I will do it. biggrin.gif Sooo do you know what exactly matters when Frapsing? I mean, in game performance 670 should be ~35% better, but what about when Frapsing? Would these 35% be gone? Or they'll increase to 50 or smth?
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post #7 of 9
I think the GTX570 should be considered off the table at this point. The GTX670 is much more likely to run on your PSU than a 570.

And you're on the wrong forums with that attitude towards overclocking mate wink.gif hahaha (joke)

Seriously though, the only way you can "kill" any of your components through overclocking is by increasing the voltage (or potentially running them unstable constantly crashing). The "dots" you saw on your last GPU overclock was because you had reached a limit on either the core or the RAM that required more volts. All you had to do was back the OC off slightly, run a test/game again and see if it works. If it did - the overclock was done. Extra performance for FREE with no added voltage so ZERO chance of killing anything.

Actually, your components are sold running at volts way below safe ranges, and your CPU and whatever new GPU you get can both be run with small voltage increased overclocks, with standard cooling, at ZERO danger increase.

I do suggest looking into how the process of overclocking is done itself. Once you understand it, then you can safely mess with some settings and get some free performance. All you have to remember is that you should take your time, make small changes in a logical manner, and if one change makes your computer unstable whilst testing, then simply change that one detail back and re-strategize. Simple. Safe .Fun. Free performance. As you get more confident, you increase the volts slightly (and increase your cooling setup) and you get LOTS of free performance, whilst staying in safe temperature and voltage ranges, and are thus perfectly safe and can expect your PC lifespan to decrease by a minimal amount at most (we are talking CPU's lasting 8 years instead of 10 or 12).

There's overclocking like I do it, and there's OVER-F@%KING-CLOCKING like the professionals do. I've NEVER killed any components.

And the 670 will be equally better whilst running FRAPS.Seriously - the 670 is the card for you.
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by willibj View Post

I think the GTX570 should be considered off the table at this point. The GTX670 is much more likely to run on your PSU than a 570.
And you're on the wrong forums with that attitude towards overclocking mate wink.gif hahaha (joke)
Seriously though, the only way you can "kill" any of your components through overclocking is by increasing the voltage (or potentially running them unstable constantly crashing). The "dots" you saw on your last GPU overclock was because you had reached a limit on either the core or the RAM that required more volts. All you had to do was back the OC off slightly, run a test/game again and see if it works. If it did - the overclock was done. Extra performance for FREE with no added voltage so ZERO chance of killing anything.
Actually, your components are sold running at volts way below safe ranges, and your CPU and whatever new GPU you get can both be run with small voltage increased overclocks, with standard cooling, at ZERO danger increase.
I do suggest looking into how the process of overclocking is done itself. Once you understand it, then you can safely mess with some settings and get some free performance. All you have to remember is that you should take your time, make small changes in a logical manner, and if one change makes your computer unstable whilst testing, then simply change that one detail back and re-strategize. Simple. Safe .Fun. Free performance. As you get more confident, you increase the volts slightly (and increase your cooling setup) and you get LOTS of free performance, whilst staying in safe temperature and voltage ranges, and are thus perfectly safe and can expect your PC lifespan to decrease by a minimal amount at most (we are talking CPU's lasting 8 years instead of 10 or 12).
There's overclocking like I do it, and there's OVER-F@%KING-CLOCKING like the professionals do. I've NEVER killed any components.
And the 670 will be equally better whilst running FRAPS.Seriously - the 670 is the card for you.

I know how to overclock a CPU but I didn't know about the GPU. I thought that everything I touch moves me 1 step closer to the graveyard. Well, it's good to know. Thanks! smile.gif
Edited by kristiannn - 8/6/12 at 4:16am
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post #9 of 9
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I'm sorry for reviving the topic but I need an answer.

Palit's Jetstream costs 30$ more than the normal Palit. Is it worth it? IMO it looks worse with these 2 fans but are they working better? Is the card really better and are these money worth it? I'm talking about a GTX 670. As far as I see the clocks are ~100MHz higher, but that can be reached without any problem at all if it's gonna be the 100 MHz. For me the cooling is important and I don't have a big choice. It's the stock or Jetstream Palit. And please, I need an answer quick. In 1-2 hours I'll be going to the shop and I have to decide before that. I can give the 30$ more but I'm not sure if the 2 fans cooling is better.
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My System
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