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Ivy Bridge Overclocking Guide ► Asus Motherboards

post #1 of 6691
Thread Starter 
Ivy Bridge Overclocking GuideAsus Motherboards


This guide is for people who want to overclock; and want to learn how to and not just plug in values randomly.

Disclaimer: Please remember this is a guide, not a set of rules. Some settings may not work the same on every machine. I am not responsible for any damages that might occur from the abuse of this guide. Post your questions in the thread, so that others may help. If you notice something wrong with the guide, send me a PM please. As always, have fun and please remember not all CPUs are made equally!

Ivy Bridge Overclocking Insight - Courtesy of Sin0822 (Click to show)
Ivy Bridge Overclocking is almost identical to Sandy Bridge overclocking in that it is basically a CPU which is meant to be overclocked through the multiplier and not the base clock (BCLK). Sandy Bridge overclocking brought a whole new level of simplicity to the overclocking realm, a user only needed to change a few voltages, and change some ratios and they were easily granted a huge performance increase. With Ivy Bridge things get a lot easier as the CPU overclocks a lot further with better cooling and is more optimized towards higher memory and base clock speeds, thus making ambient overclocking much simpler and easier for the average overclocker. There is almost no need to increase the secondary CPU voltages, such as VTT, with Ivy Bridge on air/water cooling as the memory controller can already push the memory up to its limits without this. The same thing goes for base clock, while with Sandy Bridge the max base clocks we saw were pretty limited, around 105-107 on average, almost all Ivy Bridge CPUs will do 110mhz easily with LN2 cooling, and will scale way above that with the cold. With Sandy Bridge we same some very odd clock walls, as well as limitations with the IMC in which the memory controller couldn’t readily handle the maximum memory multiplier and BCLK increase over a few MHz from stock, and this limited overall memory performance. However Ivy Bridge is more unlocked than Sandy Bridge, it offers many more memory multipliers and even adds in a second divider so that you can run memory at different speeds in more friendly increments (like 2000 MHz and 2133 MHz). Ivy Bridge also doesn’t have the invisible clock walls which Sandy Bridge possessed, the CPU can overclock under the cold and scales very well in all aspects with cold temperature. However under air cooling Ivy Bridge exhibits much higher temperatures during full load due to its 22nm process, which will probably only get better though cooling optimizations and better contact between the IHS and the CPU Die. We will explore why Ivy Bridge has such high operating temperatures on air OC. This guide can be used for all "K" series Ivy Bridge SKUs.

On Air/Water: Intel Rec. Max is Intel’s absolute maximum rating for the Ivy Bridge lineup, many of the numbers provided are identical to those of Sandy Bridge, however while vcore should be lower because of a better processing technology (22nm vs 32nm) it is max 1.52v here because of the SVID max. When overclocking on air the only two voltages you should need to touch on an Ivy Bridge setup are the Vcore (which you increase) and the CPU PLL( which can be decreased to help temperatures). You should not proceed to just apply the maximum voltage for the vcore, vtt, or system agent as you will heavily increase the temperature so much so that the CPU will throttle and can be damaged. Also if you start off with a higher temperature it is very hard to test stability, as you will probably be more unstable than if you used a lower VCore.
Reasons (Click to show)
Why Overclock?
There are many reasons why I do things and some people ask is overclocking Ivy Bridge worth the temperature increase. I say YES! There are many reasons why people overclock, whether it be increase performance or e-peen. Overclocking your CPU is like a free way to upgrade. It's easy with proper guidance and with the right tools and mindset, an amazing experience.

Why I do a 12 hour stress-test when some people say that is too much:
There are many reasons why I do a 12 hour stress-test. You can do a shorter one but really, unless all you do is web browse, the shortest amount I would do it for is 8 hours. I have passed 6 hours on a prime95 run but crashed when web-browsing. Yes, 6 hours is not enough to push out most of the possibilities of a BSOD so I always do a 12 hour test now. There are occasions where I have tested 1 hour and it has been enough; and my overclock has lasted for a very long time with no crashes or BSOD. This is usually when it's a mediocre OC and maybe only a few % up from stock.
Key Terms and Settings (Click to show)
BCLK -Base Clock
Allows you to adjust the CPU and VGA frequency to enhance system performance. Keep at 100. Do NOT change! Increasing this will overclock DMI and PCI-E busses and may result in damaging them or anything connected to them.

Turbo Ratio
Ratio or multiplier for clock speeds (BCLK x Ratio = Overclocked speed) or (100 BCLK x 45 Ration = 4.5GHz)

EPU Power Saving Mode
Allows you to enable or disable the EPU power saving function

CPU Load-Line Calibration (LLC)
CPU LLC is defined by Intel VRM spec and affects CPU voltage. The CPU working voltage will decrease proportionally to CPU loading.

CPU Voltage
Manual mode - Set a fixed CPU voltage
Offset mode - Set the offset voltage (When idle, clock will go down and so will voltage)

CPU C1E
Reduces clock speed by lowering ratio (Offset mode)

CPU C-States
Disable these States all the time, they cause only problems!
My System (Click to show)
CPU: i5 3570k @ 4.8GHz
Motherboard: Asus Maximus V Gene (BIOS V. 1408)
Graphics: EVGA GTX 680 FTW LE
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws X 2133MHz 10-10-10-30
SSD: Samsung 830 (128GB) and Crucial M4 (128GB)
Cooling: Corsair H100i
Case: Corsair C70 (Military Green)
Pictures of My Build: Venus (Click to show)





Updating BIOS/UEFI (Click to show)
1. Choose your motherboard
2. Select download
3. Select OS
4. Expand BIOS
5. Download first entry
6. Follow BIOS Update instructions in manual
7. Reboot

Settings Max voltage and temperature (Click to show)
Voltage
Ivy Bridge is less susceptible to degrade versus Sandy Bridge and will be fine to run voltages over 1.35 as long as temperatures are good or permits.

Courtesy of Sin0822


Temperature
Ivy Bridge does get HOT, but do not let that scare you from overclocking your CPU or straying away from Ivy completely.
Thermal protection keeps your CPU from roasting too much and will turn off by itself once it reaches a certain temperature.
TJ Max for Ivy Bridge is 105C, but staying cool during stress-testing or overclocking is important! I like to stay below 85C, but during stress-testing, it's okay to go 95C.
AI Tweaker Tab (Top of the Screen) (Click to show)
Important! When stress-testing, use ONLY manual CPU Voltage (Vcore)! The image for "Main Menu Part 3" shows offset as the example, please ignore this and follow the image used to show what the settings for Vcore should be (Main Menu Part 2)!
All the example pictures are from an ASUS Sabertooth Z77 and if some of you have more or less options than what is shown on the guide, just leave them AUTO!
Extreme Tweaker Main Menu Part 1 (Click to show)
Example Image (Click to show)

Ai Overclock Tuner ► Manual

BCLK/PEG Frequency ► 100.0

ASUS MultiCore Enhancement ► Disabled

Turbo Ratio ► Manual

Ratio Synchronizing Control ► Enabled

1-Core Ratio Limit ► Desired Overclock (42 = 4.2GHz or 45 = 4.5GHz)

Internal PLL Overvoltage ► Enabled (Disabled if you want to keep Sleep Mode)

CPU bus speed : DRAM speed ratio mode ► Auto
Extreme Tweaker Main Menu Part 2 (Click to show)
Example Image (Click to show)


Memory Frequency ► Your rated RAM frequency

EPU Power Saving Mode ► Disabled

CPU Voltage ► Manual Mode

CPU Manual Voltage ► 1.2000 (The image indicates a certain voltage, do NOT assume this voltage will work with your chip!) All chips require different voltages for every clock! Even stock, chips vary in the voltage needed to run that!)

DRAM Voltage ► Your rated RAM voltage (Ignore what's on the image)

VCCSA Voltage ► Auto

CPU PLL Voltage ► 1.70000

PCH Voltage ► Auto

DRAM DATA REF Voltage on CHA ► Auto
Extreme Tweaker Main Menu Part 3 (Click to show)
Example Image (Click to show)

Next 4 Entries (DRAM DATA, DRAM CTRL) ► Auto

CPU Spread Sectrum ► Disabled

BCLK Recovery ► Disabled
DRAM Timing Control (Click to show)
Example Image (Click to show)

Enter the first 4 entries under Primary Timings your rated latency. (Usually said on box or model number as X-X-X-XX or 9-9-9-24)

DRAM COMMAND Mode ► 2
CPU Power Management (Click to show)
Example Image (Click to show)

CPU Ratio ► Desired Overclock (42 = 4.2GHz or 45 = 4.5GHz)

Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology ► Enabled

Turbo Mode ► Enabled (If can't change, leave it alone)

Next 5 entries ► Auto
Digi Power Control (Click to show)
Example Image (Click to show)

CPU Load-line Calibration ► Ultra High

CPU Voltage Frequency ► Manual

CPU Fixed Frequency ► 350

CPU Power Phase Control ► Extreme

CPU Power Duty Control ► T-Probe

CPU Current Capability ► 140%

CPU Power Thermal Control ► 130

CPU Power Response Control ► Auto

DRAM Current Capability ► 100%

DRAM Voltage Frequency ► Auto

DRAM Power Phase Control ► Auto

DRAM Power Thermal Control ► 110
Advanced Tab (Top of the Screen) (Click to show)
CPU Configuration (Click to show)
Example Image (Click to show)

Internal Adaptive Thermal Monitor ► Enabled

Hyper-threading ► Enabled (Skip if you don't have an i7)

Active Processor Cores ► All

Limit CPUID Maximum ► Disabled

Execute Disable Bit ► Enabled

Intel Virtualization Technology ► Disabled

Hardware Prefetcher ► Enabled

Adjacent Cache Line Prefetch ► Enabled
CPU Power Management Configuration (Click to show)
Example Image (Click to show)

CPU Ratio ► Desired Overclock (42 = 4.2GHz or 45 = 4.5GHz)

Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology ► Enabled

Turbo Mode ► Enabled

CPU C1E ► Enabled

CPU C3 Report ► Disabled

CPU C6 Report ► Disabled

Package C State Support ► Disabled

Recommended Software Stress Testing (Click to show)
I use Prime95 and I have never had a problem afterwards. When using Prime95, use Custom Blend meaning, select Blend first and then press Custom. After that, change the RAM amount to 90% of available RAM.

Prime95 Recommended!
Linx
Intel Burn Test
Temperature (Click to show)
I use RealTemp, have had no problem and it's light on resources.

Real Temp Recommended!
CoreTemp
Hardware Monitoring (Click to show)
CPU-Z is a must to monitor voltage and clock speeds as well as validate your CPU clocks.

CPU-Z Recommended!
HWMonitor
HWinfo64
BlueScreenViewer (Click to show)
This is for you to be able to view your BSOD if they go too fast or you want to have future reference! You view it directly in Windows!

BlueScreenViewer Recommended!
Long but best way to overclock (Click to show)
This is my way of stress-testing and if you find your own way, go with your way.

The programs that I use are:
Prime95
RealTemp
CPU-Z

1. Set ratio to 43 and tune voltage to 1.20 manual
2. Stress with Prime95 for 10 minutes
3a. If pass, bump ratio by 1
3b. If fail, increase voltage by a notch and re-test or lower ratio
4. If passed 15 minutes and happy with overclock, stress-test for 12 hours for stable confidence
5. If passed 15 minutes and unhappy with overclock, repeat steps 2 to 5
6a. If fail 12 hour Prime95 (Worker stopped, BSOD or any error), increase voltage by a notch and re-test

BSOD List BSOD List (Click to show)
0x101 = increase vcore
0x124 = increase/decrease vcore
0x0A = unstable RAM/IMC
0x1E = increase vcore
0x3B = increase vcore
0x3D = increase vcore
0x50 = RAM timings/Frequency unstable
0x109 = Not enough or too Much memory voltage
0x116 = Low IOH (NB) voltage, GPU issue
0x7E = Corrupted OS file

Prime95 Settings - How it should be set up! Prime95 Settings (Click to show)
Make sure in "Time to run each FFT size (in minutes)" you input "10" to indicate 10 minutes per FFT size

Thanks to Totally Dubbed for these photos:

Offset Guide and Others (Click to show)
Want to learn more about offset? Want a deeper answer? This is the guide for you!
Offset Guide and Thread
How to use Offset Vcore (I wonder where you got this from TD :p Thanks for helping me out!) (Click to show)
For offset - it is very simple:

First of all, you should know your MANUAL vcore:
In my case it was 1.265 for 4.5ghz.

Then you take your VID - now the VID can be found, via Core temp - a program used for monitoring temps.
You'll see VID there.

Now your VID, like your voltage fluctuates with load.
So what you want to do is hit up Prime 95, and put it under the same load that you used for stability on your manual settings.

Leave P95 running for around 5-10mins.
Then look at your VID - your VID WILL fluctuate, even on load, but take both notes down for the amount it is at.

In my case it was fluctuating between: 1.2209 & 1.2260
As 1.2209 was more frequent I took that figure.

The simple maths:
(MANUAL vcore) MINUS (VID on 100% load) = offset value

SO for me it was: 1.265-1.2209 = 0.0441
Rounded, that's 0.045 - and that was my offset.

Your offset CAN BE negative OR POSITIVE.

If you VID is larger than your vcore, thne you'll have a NEGATIVE offset: ie (-0.045)

Hope that helps!
Load-line Calibration Explained (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swag 
You don't want to stop it, you want to make the scale better. It decreases voltages proportionately to the clock it's running at. So C1E + Vdroop is the best thing for powersaving. tongue.gif So for 1.6GHz you need 0.90vcore so it goes down to that and when you put load, it goes to 4.5GHz and you need 1.27vcore and it goes up. Vdroop comes in with the "intensity" of the program. So, prime95 is very intensive, so it uses all of it, while gaming may use 4.5GHz. It may only need 1.25vcore to run so it goes down to 1.25. Sometimes, vdroop miscalculates and you need more vcore than what it thinks so you crash, by increasing the LLC, you lower the vdroop curve and make it more stable in terms of different "intensities" of program. I hope this didn't confuse you and cleared it up for you.
Prime95 Blend FFTs (Click to show)
Here is a list of the Prime95 FFTs that run during the 'Blend' Test (In the exact order as presented): FFT sizes (Click to show)
640K
8K
720K
12K
800K
16K
960K
24K
1120K
32K
1200K
48K
1344K
64K
1536K
80K
1680K
96K
1792K
128K
2048K
160K
2304K
224K
2560K
256K
2800K
320K
3072K
384K
3360K
448K
3584K
512K
576K
672K
10K
768K
14K
896K
20K
1024K
28K
1152K
40K
1280K
56K
1440K
72K
1600K
84K
1728K
112K
1920K
144K
2240K
192K
2400K
240K
2688K
288K
2880K
336K
3200K
400K
3456K
480K
3840K
560K
4096K

Ivy Bridge Overclocking Guide (Video Version) By Totally Dubbed Overclocking Guide Part 1/3 (Video) (Click to show)
Overclocking Guide Part 2/3 (Video) (Click to show)
Overclocking Guide Part 3/3 (Video) (Click to show)


Remember, overclocking might seem as a pain but it actually is amazing and easy. All it takes is patience and a bit of reading. So have fun overclocking your CPU!

Special Thanks to:
Sin0822 for his table of values regarding the maximum voltages he would allow,
Totally Dubbed for helping me keep this guide running smoothly and responding to problems quickly and efficiently,
justanoldman is a very wise man, his experience has brought him a long way. tongue.gif Listen to him too!

Edited by Swag - 11/20/13 at 2:47pm
Swag's Venus
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post #2 of 6691
OMG UR AWESOME biggrin.gif
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
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post #3 of 6691
Can you help me out?

I put LLC and cpu power phase control to auto for 4.8ghz @ 1.35. In prime95 I was testing out my offset oc and I had LLC to 75%. The vcore would drop to 1.344 sometimes and it would cause prime to crash.

I turned LLC to auto and now vcore with static 1.35 in bios shows up as 1.352 in cpuz and when I turn on prime and stress teh cpu, it shows vcore as 1.360. is there another setting for getting OC to be 1.355 or something? lol
    
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post #4 of 6691
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tori View Post

Can you help me out?

I put LLC and cpu power phase control to auto for 4.8ghz @ 1.35. In prime95 I was testing out my offset oc and I had LLC to 75%. The vcore would drop to 1.344 sometimes and it would cause prime to crash.

I turned LLC to auto and now vcore with static 1.35 in bios shows up as 1.352 in cpuz and when I turn on prime and stress teh cpu, it shows vcore as 1.360. is there another setting for getting OC to be 1.355 or something? lol

Would it drop to 1.344 for a long time or for a brief moment then go back up?
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post #5 of 6691
If i did the 8-8 custom test for max cpu stress it would do 1.344 but for blend it was doing 1.352. sometimes it would drop to 1.344 for a few seconds then go back up.

hey i gotta go to work soon frown.gif
    
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post #6 of 6691
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tori View Post

If i did the 8-8 custom test for max cpu stress it would do 1.344 but for blend it was doing 1.352. sometimes it would drop to 1.344 for a few seconds then go back up.

hey i gotta go to work soon frown.gif

Use blend and those brief drops are nothing to worry about. That is not what is causing the problems. Try increasing the vcore a notch and re-test.
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post #7 of 6691
i think my chip is bad frown.gif

1.35 - 1.36 for 4.8 is bad right
    
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post #8 of 6691
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tori View Post

i think my chip is bad frown.gif

1.35 - 1.36 for 4.8 is bad right

I think that's average, refer to the Ivy Bridge Stable Club for voltage on certain clocks. Will give you a rough estimate on where other CPUs stand.
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Samsung 830 Crucial M4 Corsair H100i Windows 7 
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Samsung 830 Crucial M4 Corsair H100i Windows 7 
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post #9 of 6691
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tori View Post

i think my chip is bad frown.gif

1.35 - 1.36 for 4.8 is bad right

I dont even think mine can hit 4.8, itd melt before then. At 4.5GHz and 1.3v mine hits the thermal trip in less than 30 seconds rofl
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post #10 of 6691
should i leave LLC to 75% as it was then
    
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