Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Coding and Programming › Getting into the Game Industry [Programming]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Getting into the Game Industry [Programming]

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
I recently gave an individual some advice on how to get into the industry as a game programmer. I figured this was generic enough advice that I should make it public. Hopefully this will help others looking to get into game programming.


Know-how:
This depends on the types of games you're interested in making. Sometimes you just need to get your foot in the door in the industry, and you may not be able to immediately start at a company that makes games you're interested in, so it's good to have a wide range of knowledge.

Degrees:
I've worked with about 70 different programmers in the last 5 years, every one of them have a bachelors degree in computer science or a related field. I've heard of programmers with non-related degrees getting jobs, and I've even heard of programmers without degrees getting jobs, but based on what I've seen, those must be very rare. It's takes a lot of motivation and research to be able to teach yourself everything you need to know to be a good programmer, school provides the focus for you, so you know the kinds of things you need to learn. A degree shows employers you can stick it out through tough times, and yes, a C.S. degree is no walk in the park, be prepared to get used to 5-hours of sleep per night, and you can forget about playing video games for more than maybe an hour per week for a couple of years.
Also, try and go to a non-private university, and better yet, one in the country that you'll be working in, where the interviewers likely have heard of it.

Programming languages:
Knowledge of various programming languages can be useful, but prioritize the first couple languages and concentrate on them. If I were starting to learn programming today, and could only pick two languages, I would choose C++ and Java. C++ (and by extension C) is by far the most widely used language in the gaming industry, and is used for development on every single major platform (PC, Linux, Mac, iOS, Android, Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, Vita, and 3DS), and I'm willing to bet is the language used on the upcoming Xbox and Playstation consoles. Java is a nice language to learn in addition to C++ because it is a language that can create programs that run on many platforms, and it introduces you to a managed language (garbage collection, something C++ will not do for you). Java can be used to create games for multiple platforms, but not quite as many as C++. C++ is also a more difficult and thorough language, so it is relatively easy to go from C++ to Java.

Efficiency:
Knowing how to structure your code so that it is clean and efficient is very important in gaming, games are high-performance applications, they only get a few milliseconds per frame to do everything that is needed to keep the entire game world up to date and on top of that they have to render everything. It's very important to know Big O notation, know how complex an algorithm is that you're using, know which kind of containers to use to organize and access your data.

Techniques:
Knowing C++ alone might get you into the industry if you're really good, but it would be tough for most companies to take you just off of programming knowledge alone. Many companies want programmers with knowledge of game programming techniques. Techniques like:
  • Engine architecture: Object/Entity management, messaging systems. How do the subsystems of a game engine communicate with each other?
  • Memory management: How do you structure a game to use memory more quickly, or use less memory, or allow threaded access to memory?
  • Physics: Basic knowledge of how games implement physics and use it. How are physics generated for arbitrary mesh shapes vs. primitive shapes?
  • Spatial partitioning: How can you have a large world with so many objects and still maintain a decent framerate? Even if most of those objects aren't in view, what about updating them each frame, that alone can kill framerate.
  • Many more...

Where to look for internships and jobs:
There's no single place that the gaming industry looks when it needs new programmers. Often the best companies don't have to do much looking, as they get floods of resumés, but those companies will often still keep in contact with recruiters as well. If you're trying to get your foot in the door as a programmer, here are my recommendations.
  • Make a kick-ass portfolio: Start a blog or website, create programs that show off the best of what you're capable of, and make sure the programs are relevant to games. My portfolio included 2D/3D games, sandbox engines that I created from scratch to show knowledge of major subsystems like physics, rendering, spatial partitioning, engine architecture, etc. I made all of my projects open-source, it's not as if they did anything revolutionary that I was worried about somebody stealing, but if you're afraid of making it open-source then offer to make the source available to companies upon request.
  • Find sites that offer good interview practice questions, and do it years in advance while you're still learning programming so that you'll know the types of things you're expected to know. Bear in mind that most programming tests you'll find are very generic, try your best to find programming questions related to gaming. Before interviews I spend literally weeks looking over the hardest practice questions I can find and any of those questions that I don't feel confident that I could answer quickly, I start researching and practicing.
  • Email a lot of companies, at least a few per day. If you're looking for an internship or job, mention which of those it is, list qualifications, give links to your portfolio, and show genuine interest and motivation. Most decent companies will offer a paid internship, it may not pay extremely well, but it can be enough to make it so you can afford to do the internship. Make sure that you've done research on any companies you're communicating with, you need to understand the kinds of products they make, what platforms they make games for, and what kinds of positions they're currently interested in. If you're giving them a resumé, customize it if you can to best fit the position you're applying for.
  • Keep learning. Whether you get a job or not, the industry moves fast, and you can never learn too much. Find areas that you're weak in and learn more about them. The way I did this was to create an open-source game engine, and I spent a lot of my spare time building each sub-section of the engine from the ground up, and by the time I was done with each section I knew a lot more about it. I'm not a graphics programmer, but a lot of my graphics programming knowledge came from having to learn how to write a rendering system for the engine. Here's a link to the engine if you're interested: http://quickstartengine.codeplex.com/. By continuing to learn languages, engines, and techniques, you're guaranteed to have a decent subset of the skills that companies are looking for.
  • Make a Linked-in account, try and get into game development and programming groups.
  • Go to any game developer conferences and meetings you can, many states in the U.S. that have studios also have game developer meetings every so often that are open to anyone. Go to anything you can, network with everyone you can. If people see that you're capable and motivated then there's a chance for an interview down the road.

Know where the industry is headed:
As I've said, the industry moves fast, read articles about game sales, which platforms are doing well, which languages companies are using, which engines they're using, etc. I learned this one the hard way after getting into the industry, my first major game was LEGO Universe, a project which lasted 5 years. I started in 2007, 1 month after the iPhone was released, and by the time the game was done and closing down the mobile market was huge, with iOS profits alone making more than the entire of Microsoft and Apple is now the richest corporation in the the world. I knew next to nothing about mobile development, and was now out of a job because LEGO laid off the entire studio. I wasn't in a strong position to get a job in my area, in which most studios were doing mobile game development. I managed, due to experience and I spent a lot of my time between jobs and even during another job learning mobile development. However, if I had spent some time during my 5 years on LEGO Universe learning about mobile development then I could have hit the ground running after the layoff. Which leads me to my next point.

Layoffs happen:
A lot, it's part of the industry sadly. The gaming industry is a very new industry compared to other industries that have been out there for hundreds of years. Many companies don't know best practices, and take unnecessary risks that put them in bad positions. Gaming is also an artform, there is no guarantee that you will be making something that people are going to like, so there is inherent risk in game development. Be mobile, ready to move anywhere at any time. I learned this the hard way as well, a little advice: Don't purchase a home, rent instead.

Physical location:
Most of the gaming industry lies in either Japan or North America, and mostly near the coastal states in North America, which notable exceptions scattered about and in Canada. You're certainly not restricted to those areas, there are major studios in UK, Russia, and elsewhere. However, as I said, the industry isn't entirely stable, it's nice to be in a location that allows you to easily move onto another studio that you're interested in.

Salary:
I'm also not sure how well the industry salaries are in countries outside of North America. In North America the average starting programmer salary is around $50,000 USD per year, and goes up to about $100,000 per year after 5-7 years, and goes as high as $125k-150k in some cases for lead programmers and tech directors on large projects or studios. I live in Colorado, in the United States, and my salary is following industry average at the moment. However, be aware of studios that will undercut you. If you're good and you know what you're worth, don't stoop for any less. It can be a tough situation though, trying to get your foot in the door by any means but not wanting to accept too little. Chances are if you get an offer from one studio that there are going to be others out there as well, you won't be doing yourself any favors by taking too little, it will only make it difficult for you to work your way up to what you should've been making in the first place.

Alternatively:
There is one other way to get into the industry. Independent development, or as you'll hear them called: Indie devs. Start your own small company, make a game on your own terms, in your own spare time. This route won't be an easy place to start from, but with the mobile industry it's now much easier to create your own simple games without a publisher. Most indie developers have years of programming knowledge and practice ahead of time though, and unless you're a genius like John Carmack, you might have trouble creating your own shippable game product without a good amount of programming experience under your belt...even John Carmack was a programmer for years before he broke off and make Apogee Games and then iD Software. And programmers like Notch worked for years with other companies before creating Minecraft in his spare time, and only once he had something that was really good did he quit his job to create Mojang (the company) and sell his game.
Edited by lordikon - 8/10/12 at 8:08am
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
post #2 of 40
Great article! biggrin.gif +1 rep But, I do have a couple of questions. In one part of the article, you stated that you would learn C++ and Java if it they were the only choices possible, if you were just starting programming. Well, let's say you have a load of free time and have almost no programming or development experience. What language would you start off with? A lot of people say Python because it's simple and defines the core of languages, then go onto Java since it's easier and has more features, then finally C++ for popularity. Anyways, would you say that learning a language would be the absolutely first thing you would do to be a game programmer for a newbie, because as you said, companies want to know you have skills in other areas such as engine architecture, rendering, graphical design, and animation. So, since as far as I know, 3D animation is much easier than programming if you have the right tools. So should someone start off with that or something else that I'm forgetting of? You know what, I guess what I'm really trying to say is what would you personally start off with if you were a complete newbie, then move onto, then move onto, then move onto ................ and then have all the technical information that's required, and then ask for a job? Also, what learning resources would you recommend for every part of the sequence? I know this is probably going to piss you off since you just made a great article with a load of information, and then have to answer these questions. Sry! redface.gif
Edited by BuizelON - 8/10/12 at 3:25pm
post #3 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuizelON View Post

Great article! biggrin.gif But, I do have a couple of questions. In one part of the article, you stated that you would learn C++ and Java if it they were the only choices possible, if you were just starting programming. Well, let's say you have a load of free time and have almost no programming or development experience. What language would you start off with? A lot of people say Python because it's simple and defines the core of languages, then go onto Java since it's easier and has more features, then finally C++ for popularity. Anyways, would you say that learning a language would be the absolutely first thing you would do to be a game programmer for a newbie, because as you said, companies want to know you have skills in other areas such as engine architecture, rendering, graphical design, and animation. So, since as far as I know, 3D animation is much easier than programming if you have the right tools. So should someone start off with that or something else that I'm forgetting of? You know what, I guess what I'm really trying to say is what would you personally start off with if you were a complete newbie, then move onto, then move onto, then move onto ................ and then have all the technical information that's required, and then ask for a job? Also, what learning resources would you recommend for every part of the sequence? I know this is probably going to piss you off since you just made a great article with a load of information, and then have to answer these questions. Sry! redface.gif

Language:
I've always advocated for C++ first because you'll learn quickly if programming is too difficult for you. Once you learn C++ well it will be very easy to learn almost any other language. However, if you choose something like Java first, you're going to run into trouble when you get to C++ and run into pointers and having to manage your own memory.

Techniques:
Learning techniques like how engines are architected, how particle systems work on CPU/GPU, how animation skinning works CPU/GPU, spatial partitioning, etc, all require you to know how to program already. Someone could explain in laymans terms how those systems work, using math and visualization, but in the end the bottom line is that you need to understand how systems like these work in code, so you could write one if necessary, or work with an existing implementation.

Programmer vs other:
It's extremely rare for someone to move from something like being an animator, to programmer, they require very different skill sets, and each is going to take a fair amount of time to get good at. It depends on what you like, really. If you like programming, it doesn't hurt to understand how animation and modeling tools work so you can have an understanding of what artists will need to do to create content, likewise if you become an artist it doesn't hurt to understand a bit about things like rendering so you know what not to do when you're creating content. It's really up to you to focus on becoming whatever you want to be. Be aware, however, that certain positions are more difficult to get, and hold, and some pay better than others. If you're a complete noob, I would try a little bit of art and programming to see if you like one more than the other (or you might not like either).

Salary based on position:
Based on, let's say, 3 years in the industry, here are some salary estimates based on what I've seen:
Programmer - $70,000/year
Artist - $50,000/year
Designer - $45,000/year
Producer (role depends on the company) - $50-80,000/year

Learning resources:
I can only speak to programming resources here, as I didn't do anything like animating or designing.
Programming books like:
  • The C Programming Language
  • C++ Programming: Program Design Including Data Structures
  • Game Programming Gems
  • GPU Gems

Websites:

I'm sure there are a lot of programming tutorial sites out there as well, especially for C++. The best source will be a university with a good C.S. program, but don't do that until you're relatively sure you're going to like C.S. (programming or other).
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
post #4 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordikon View Post

Language:
I've always advocated for C++ first because you'll learn quickly if programming is too difficult for you. Once you learn C++ well it will be very easy to learn almost any other language. However, if you choose something like Java first, you're going to run into trouble when you get to C++ and run into pointers and having to manage your own memory.
Techniques:
Learning techniques like how engines are architected, how particle systems work on CPU/GPU, how animation skinning works CPU/GPU, spatial partitioning, etc, all require you to know how to program already. Someone could explain in laymans terms how those systems work, using math and visualization, but in the end the bottom line is that you need to understand how systems like these work in code, so you could write one if necessary, or work with an existing implementation.
Programmer vs other:
It's extremely rare for someone to move from something like being an animator, to programmer, they require very different skill sets, and each is going to take a fair amount of time to get good at. It depends on what you like, really. If you like programming, it doesn't hurt to understand how animation and modeling tools work so you can have an understanding of what artists will need to do to create content, likewise if you become an artist it doesn't hurt to understand a bit about things like rendering so you know what not to do when you're creating content. It's really up to you to focus on becoming whatever you want to be. Be aware, however, that certain positions are more difficult to get, and hold, and some pay better than others. If you're a complete noob, I would try a little bit of art and programming to see if you like one more than the other (or you might not like either).
Salary based on position:
Based on, let's say, 3 years in the industry, here are some salary estimates based on what I've seen:
Programmer - $70,000/year
Artist - $50,000/year
Designer - $45,000/year
Producer (role depends on the company) - $50-80,000/year
Learning resources:
I can only speak to programming resources here, as I didn't do anything like animating or designing.
Programming books like:
  • The C Programming Language
  • C++ Programming: Program Design Including Data Structures
  • Game Programming Gems
  • GPU Gems
Websites: I'm sure there are a lot of programming tutorial sites out there as well, especially for C++. The best source will be a university with a good C.S. program, but don't do that until you're relatively sure you're going to like C.S. (programming or other).

Wow. I seriously don't know how to thank you for that. You make a great article and then answer every one of my questions with great detail! Just wow. redface.gifbiggrin.gif I already reped you once, I don't think repping you twice will be enough to thank you for that.
post #5 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuizelON View Post

Wow. I seriously don't know how to thank you for that. You make a great article and then answer every one of my questions with great detail! Just wow. redface.gifbiggrin.gif I already reped you once, I don't think repping you twice will be enough to thank you for that.

No rep required. smile.gif
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordikon View Post

No rep required. smile.gif
Too late for that. smile.gif If there is a way to thank you, just please inform me! Also, I know I already asked a lot of questions, but this is the last one, I promise! As you said, the most important source is a university with a good C.S. program, and you should go to one at the country you want to work at. But, that's not really possible as I want to work in Asia or Europe since most of my relatives are there, not in America. Would Stanford be a college that is like, really well known through out Asia or Europe, and has a really good CS program? You probably wouldn't know the first part of the question, so I'm not really expecting an answer for that. redface.gif Thanks for your time and effort, I really do look up to you and joshd greatly! smile.gif
Edited by BuizelON - 8/10/12 at 4:40pm
post #7 of 40
Thread Starter 
I'm not sure which colleges are well known throughout Europe or Asia, but I guarantee Stanford has to be. Are you planning to go to college in the U.S. and then work in Europe/Asia? I would assume any major U.S. college would be accepted there (most state universities, and ivy league universities of course). I would recommend researching the industry over there, see how many positions are generally available, and where those positions are located. I don't know much about the gaming industry on the other side of the globe, so I'm not sure what the prospects of working there are like.
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
post #8 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuizelON View Post


Too late for that. smile.gif If there is a way to thank you, just please inform me! Also, I know I already asked a lot of questions, but this is the last one, I promise! As you said, the most important source is a university with a good C.S. program, and you should go to one at the country you want to work at. But, that's not really possible as I want to work in Asia or Europe since most of my relatives are there, not in America. Would Stanford be a college that is like, really well known through out Asia or Europe, and has a really good CS program? You probably wouldn't know the first part of the question, so I'm not really expecting an answer for that. redface.gif Thanks for your time and effort, I really do look up to you and joshd greatly! smile.gif

 

If you don't mind my answering on his behalf, yes, Stanford is a great university and its CS program is especially good.

If you are successful in getting an acceptance from it, then there couldn't possibly be a better option (MIT, CalTech and a few others also have more or less the reputation). Keep in mind, however, that the name of the college can only take you so far, and it is useless to attend a big-name university and study a course you don't want to work hard in, so that it looks good on your job applications.

 

Edit: Lordikon already answered.

MacBook Pro 13"
(6 items)
 
 
Desktop
(13 items)
 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel i5 3210 @ 2.5 GHz Intel HD4000 4 GB DDR3 @ 1600 MHz 500 GB @ 5400 RPM 
OSMonitor
OSX Mountain Lion 13.3" @ 1280 x 800 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel i5 480m@2.67GHz AMD Radeon Mobility 5650 4GB DDR3 500GB 
OSMonitor
Windows 7 64bit HP 15.6" 1366x768 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E7500 Intel...:( MSI GTS250 1GB 2GB 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
250GB Windows XP 17" LG CRT 1280x768@85hz 400W 
  hide details  
Reply
MacBook Pro 13"
(6 items)
 
 
Desktop
(13 items)
 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel i5 3210 @ 2.5 GHz Intel HD4000 4 GB DDR3 @ 1600 MHz 500 GB @ 5400 RPM 
OSMonitor
OSX Mountain Lion 13.3" @ 1280 x 800 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel i5 480m@2.67GHz AMD Radeon Mobility 5650 4GB DDR3 500GB 
OSMonitor
Windows 7 64bit HP 15.6" 1366x768 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E7500 Intel...:( MSI GTS250 1GB 2GB 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
250GB Windows XP 17" LG CRT 1280x768@85hz 400W 
  hide details  
Reply
post #9 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordikon View Post

I'm not sure which colleges are well known throughout Europe or Asia, but I guarantee Stanford has to be. Are you planning to go to college in the U.S. and then work in Europe/Asia? I would assume any major U.S. college would be accepted there (most state universities, and ivy league universities of course). I would recommend researching the industry over there, see how many positions are generally available, and where those positions are located. I don't know much about the gaming industry on the other side of the globe, so I'm not sure what the prospects of working there are like.

Ah, well, ok. smile.gif Yeah, I'm planning to go to college here and then work there. I'm researching right now since I'm almost out of high school, and I want to purely focus on my studies of CS in university. I kind of figured that Stanford would be, though. heh Anyways, as long as I get to learn Computer Science, programming, and that of the sort, I guess it's okay wherever I work at. tongue.gif
post #10 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by {Unregistered} View Post

If you don't mind my answering on his behalf, yes, Stanford is a great university and its CS program is especially good.
If you are successful in getting an acceptance from it, then there couldn't possibly be a better option (MIT, CalTech and a few others also have more or less the reputation). Keep in mind, however, that the name of the college can only take you so far, and it is useless to attend a big-name university and study a course you don't want to work hard in, so that it looks good on your job applications.

Of course I wouldn't mind you answering, especially with your great amount of programming knowledge. I don't care much about anything except science, and technology has had a special place in my heart since I was like .... 9? I've been studying and getting straight A's my whole life just so I could go to Stanford for their program, not for a good-job application. Anyways, thanks for everybody's help and contribution! biggrin.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Coding and Programming
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Coding and Programming › Getting into the Game Industry [Programming]