Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Windows › OS on a separate partition?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

OS on a separate partition?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I posted a thread a couple days ago trying to find out how to clean install Windows 7 without formatting. After a little more researching I decided not to mess with it and just get a new HDD. The 320gb drive that Ive been using is full as well as probably 5 years old. I grabbed a 1TB WD Black from Microcenter.

Im thinking about putting Windows on its own 100gb partition. Ive never partitioned a drive specifically for the OS. Because of my recent issues of getting a fresh install, I imagine it would be much easier to get a fresh install with it in a separate partition.

What are the pros/cons of doing this? Any tips or tricks?
post #2 of 6
Yea 1 TB is a bit to big for OS installation, proceed with the 100g Partition and you cant go wrong
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaxtos View Post

Yea 1 TB is a bit to big for OS installation, proceed with the 100g Partition and you cant go wrong

that wasnt really what I was getting at. What I was asking is why would you put your OS in one partition and everything else in another to begin with? I know people say thats the way to go, but why?
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Ive got my OS in a partition, but everytime I install something it defaults to C. Is there any easy way to stop things from autoinstalling in the Program Files on C? Im guessing you just have to set the file destinations all manually, but this seems like a PITA and I figure there is an easier way to do it.
post #5 of 6
Most well written programs give you an option on where you want it installed. The others, you may just be able to copy the files over. As for advantages of keeping stuff on separate partitions, it is faster, easier to maintain, and is more reliable.

Having a 1 TB drive with one NTFS partition will perform worse than a 1 TB drive with 3-4 Partitions. It is easier to maintain because when you want to backup either your system(OS) or installed programs, you can just backup the entire partition instead of having to go through the directories to find out what you need or don't need. It is more reliable because with multiple partitions you have multiple filesystems. If you download something and somehow the partition filesystem with your games/pictures gets corrupted, there's a chance it won't affect the stability of your system itself.
Sab Tower
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3770k ASRock Z77 OC Formula HIS IceQ Radeon 7950 Corsair Dominator Platinum 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung Samsung 830 XSPC Raystorm EX360 OpenSUSE 12.2 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
Acer 21 Inch Flat Screen Seasonic x650 NZXT Switch 810 Logitech MX510 
  hide details  
Reply
Sab Tower
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3770k ASRock Z77 OC Formula HIS IceQ Radeon 7950 Corsair Dominator Platinum 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung Samsung 830 XSPC Raystorm EX360 OpenSUSE 12.2 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
Acer 21 Inch Flat Screen Seasonic x650 NZXT Switch 810 Logitech MX510 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by RX7-2nr View Post

that wasnt really what I was getting at. What I was asking is why would you put your OS in one partition and everything else in another to begin with? I know people say thats the way to go, but why?
Easier to manage. If you have your 1tb drive in 3 partitions, one for os, one for docs and one for games. You would be able to change the os partition without affecting the other two.; I recently changed my main rig to windows 8 and my documents and games drives didn't have to be changed at all. Just the primary partition.l
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Windows
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Windows › OS on a separate partition?