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How is Linux like today? CNN claims Apple "killed" Linux...

post #1 of 36
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http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/27/tech/web/apple-linux-desktop/index.html?hpt=hp_t3
long article (Click to show)
Quote:
(CNN) -- It's hard to say exactly what percentage of desktop and laptop computers run Apple OS X, but it's clear that the operating system has made slow but steady gains at chipping away at that the sizable lead Microsoft established in the '90s with its Windows operating system. Some figures put the number at about 6 to 7 percent of the desktop market.
But one thing's for sure: OS X has been more successful than Linux, the open source operating system that has found a home on data-center servers but is still a rarity on desktops and laptops. Linux may have seen a surge last year, but it still hasn't seen the sort of growth OS X has, nor the growth that Linux supporters have long hoped for.
Why is that? Miguel de Icaza -- one of the original creators of GNOME, a Linux desktop interface that has struggled to take hold -- believes that a large portion of the software developers that could have taken Linux to greater heights defected to other platforms, including not only Apple OS X but -- more importantly -- the Web.
Some might blame the slow progress of desktop Linux on the fragmentation of the desktop user interfaces used by the major Linux distributions. In 2010, Canonical announced that it would replaced the popular GNOME desktop environment with its own homegrown Unity environment in the Ubuntu distribution, much to many Linux geeks' chagrin. But many are also unhappy with the direction GNOME has taken, including Linux creator Linus Torvalds, who posted a tirade about it on Google Plus last year.
Torvalds switched to Xfce, a desktop environment originally created as a lighter-weight alternative to the dominant GNOME and KDE environments. The audio and video centric Ubuntu Studio completed a transition to Xfce last month, and earlier this month, the venerable Linux distribution Debian dropped GNOME as its default desktop environment and replaced it with Xfce.
But de Icaza says the desktop wars were already lost to OS X by the time the latest shakeups started happening. And he thinks the real reason Linux lost is that developers started defecting to OS X because the developers behind the toolkits used to build graphical Linux applications didn't do a good enough job ensuring backward compatibility between different versions of their APIs. "For many years, we broke people's code," he says. "OS X did a much better job of ensuring backward compatibility."
But at the same time, development was shifting to the web. Open source on the desktop became a lot less important than open source on the server. The need to develop native applications was diminishing and at the same time OS X provided a good enough Unix-like environment that programmers could develop on a Mac and then deploy to a Linux server.
The web is where open source truly thrives. Even Steve Ballmer admits that Linux is beating Windows in the web server market. Even if you don't have a single open source application installed on your laptop, if you use the web you're probably being served by several open source technologies, including web servers like Apache and Nginx and programming languages and frameworks like PHP and Ruby on Rails all running on an open source operating system. The latest trends in web technology, from cloud computing to big data, are also built on open source technologies such as Apache Hadoop, MongoDB and the Xen hypervisor.
Open source powers the server side of the web, but there's no guarantee of openness on the user-facing side. And that's where open source advocates are focusing much of their efforts now, even if they have started using Macs. "Many people who were talking about Free Software are the people talking about the open web now," de Icaza says.
One of them is Stormy Peters, the former executive director of the GNOME Foundation. She's still on the GNOME Foundation board an like de Icaza she still keeps some Linux machines around. But as director of websites and developer engagement at the Mozilla Foundation, her focus is now on the open web.
"The reason I'm personally at Mozilla is that I saw a lot of websites that weren't designed with the principles of free software," she says. Thanks to AJAX and HTML5, the web has become the dominant platform for applications she says.
In what ways can the principles of free software be applied to the web? Peters says one of the most important aspects of open source software is that you, or someone you trust, can examine an application's source code and see what it's doing. One way to bring this level of insight to the web is help users control their data and how it is used by web applications. That's the goal of Mozilla Identity team, who are working on Mozilla Persona, a browser-based identity and authentication system.
Another big change since the early days of the Linux desktop is the rise of the mobile web. "There's a huge portion of the world who are going to first experience the internet through the mobile devices," Peters say.
To that end, Mozilla is working on its Boot to Gecko open source mobile operating system, but possibly more importantly is the Mozilla Marketplace. These applications will run anywhere that the Firefox web browser will.
Mobile development is also on de Icaza's mind. Since 2001 he's been working on Mono, an open source framework for running Microsoft's .NET languages on non-Microsoft operating systems like Linux and OS X. Now the project is available on Android and iOS as well.
Meanwhile, through all of this, GNOME and the Linux desktop are still chugging along. GNOME 3.6 is out, and is working to improve the developer experience.

So Linux is still rare on personal computers. Isn't there something like 600 different flavors of Linux? Not every apps works on some distro and one would have to either code it very specific way to keep it working with most distros (at speed and size penalties maybe) or make multiple versions of apps to suit for each Linux distro.

But to make it sound like Apple killed them... thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif
    
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post #2 of 36
Linux is alive and well. I do think as OS's become less important Linux will see a rise in users.
post #3 of 36
CNN LoL
post #4 of 36
Form what I have seen Linux is still the same it has always been, fragmented and lacking direction. For Linux to become a competitive OS in the desktop market someone needs to make a good standard distro with proper backing and see to it that it has proper driver and software compatibility as well as a user friendly UI. Basically if you have to use the terminal its not friendly enough. I wish there was something as good as android for the desktop but sadly there isn't.
    
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post #5 of 36
The problem with any mass media publication is their technology columnists are usually just reporters - ie slightly less technologically inept their their peers but far from being industry trained.

A classic example of this would be Rory Cellan-Jones who reports for the BBC. Basically he couldn't even get a Raspberry Pi to boot without the aid of a school girl. Thus 99% of his reports focus on social networks and personal "insights" from a non-technical perspective. ie complete dross.

So in short, I wouldn't take anything published by a national mass-media news outlet even remotely serious.
post #6 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bit_reaper View Post

Form what I have seen Linux is still the same it has always been, fragmented and lacking direction. For Linux to become a competitive OS in the desktop market someone needs to make a good standard distro with proper backing and see to it that it has proper driver and software compatibility as well as a user friendly UI. Basically if you have to use the terminal its not friendly enough. I wish there was something as good as android for the desktop but sadly there isn't.

Android does run on the desktop, however there's plenty of other similar options too (MeeGo, ChromeOS, etc). Then you have Ubuntu and Mint - neither of which you actually need the command line (usually users only delve in there because it's quicker for nerds to give instructions that can be pasted into a terminal than it is to direct someone through a GUI via non-real time communication mediums).

Also, most Linux desktop environments are user friendly.

And finally, there is driver and software compatibility. Granted there's less proprietary software than on proprietary OSs, but once you get yourself out of the mindset that branded software is the be-all-and-end-all, you realise there's a whole wealth of decent software available for Linux.

The fragmentation issue you do have a point about. But that's often made out to be a worse issue than it really is. In reality users only need to install Ubuntu or Mint. That's a choice of about half dozen different ISOs (depending on which default GUI you want). Windows isn't that much better (Home Basic, Home, Professional, Ultimate, plus a few others I probably forgotten).

My honest opinion of why Linux fails to make an impact is a simple one: Windows and Macs control the pre-install market. If there's one thing history has taught us, it's that users will happily adapt to a new OS if it's pre-installed on their phone / tablet / desktop. So long as they don't have to learn how to install it, they'll happily learn how to use it. If Linux came pre-installed, then hardware manufacturers would have to write better closed drivers else not having their hardware included at all, users would happily click the same WIMP metaphors without really knowing what's going on under the hood and developers would happily release branded software for Linux.

Sadly we have a "catch 22" situation though: OEMs won't pre-install Linux because users aren't demanding it; and users aren't demanding Linux because they've already learned how to use Windows as Linux doesn't come pre-installed.

I think Bill Gates understood from the start that getting your software pre-installed was the way to control the market. And personal feeling about Microsoft aside, Gates did a fantastic job of doing so.
post #7 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

Android does run on the desktop, however there's plenty of other similar options too (MeeGo, ChromeOS, etc). Then you have Ubuntu and Mint - neither of which you Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
actually need the command line (usually users only delve in there because it's quicker for nerds to give instructions that can be pasted into a terminal than it is to direct someone through a GUI via non-real time communication mediums).
Also, most Linux desktop environments are user friendly.
And finally, there is driver and software compatibility. Granted there's less proprietary software than on proprietary OSs, but once you get yourself out of the mindset that branded software is the be-all-and-end-all, you realise there's a whole wealth of decent software available for Linux.
The fragmentation issue you do have a point about. But that's often made out to be a worse issue than it really is. In reality users only need to install Ubuntu or Mint. That's a choice of about half dozen different ISOs (depending on which default GUI you want). Windows isn't that much better (Home Basic, Home, Professional, Ultimate, plus a few others I probably forgotten).
My honest opinion of why Linux fails to make an impact is a simple one: Windows and Macs control the pre-install market. If there's one thing history has taught us, it's that users will happily adapt to a new OS if it's pre-installed on their phone / tablet / desktop. So long as they don't have to learn how to install it, they'll happily learn how to use it. If Linux came pre-installed, then hardware manufacturers would have to write better closed drivers else not having their hardware included at all, users would happily click the same WIMP metaphors without really knowing what's going on under the hood and developers would happily release branded software for Linux.
Sadly we have a "catch 22" situation though: OEMs won't pre-install Linux because users aren't demanding it; and users aren't demanding Linux because they've already learned how to use Windows as Linux doesn't come pre-installed.
I think Bill Gates understood from the start that getting your software pre-installed was the way to control the market. And personal feeling about Microsoft aside, Gates did a fantastic job of doing so.

Well yes android does run on the desktop but its a good mobile OS its not a good desktop OS if you get what I'm saying. As for the others. I had high hopes for MeeGo but is dead now and ChromeOS is simply put crap. Ubuntu is probably as closest to a mainstream OS as Linux has ever gotten but even so it still flawed in both the driver department and software department. Now the poor driver support is as much the hardware manufacturers fault as its anyone else's but that the fact remains that they are not up to the standard they should be.

Like you said there is plenty of good software on Linux. I my self run a lot of thous software on win7. Audacity, Blender, Gimp, Virtualdub just to name a few. The sad thing is that I'm more likely to run the windows compiled version without issues then I am to run the native linux version even if I do go the extra mile and get a distro specific version. Like it said in the article "For many years, we broke people's code,"

While I do agree that having it "pre-installed" would have an effect I think you miss the point where Linux distros that come "pre-installed" are also usually backed. I'm kinda skeptical that android would have become the success that it is if it wasn't backed by google and was a pure community os.
Edited by Bit_reaper - 8/27/12 at 5:59pm
    
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post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bit_reaper View Post


Well yes android does run on the desktop but its a good mobile OS its not a good desktop OS if you get what I'm saying. As for the others. I had high hopes for MeeGo but is dead now and ChromeOS is simply put crap. Ubuntu is probably as closest to a mainstream OS as Linux has ever gotten but even so it still flawed in both the driver department and software department. Now the poor driver support is as much the hardware manufacturers fault as its anyone else's but that the fact remains that they are not up to the standard they should be.
Like you said there is plenty of good software on Linux. I my self run a lot of thous software on win7. Audacity, Blender, Gimp, Virtualdub just to name a few. The sad thing is that I'm more likely to run the windows compiled version without issues then I am to run the native linux version even if I do go the extra mile and get a distro specific version. Like it said in the article "For many years, we broke people's code,"
While I do agree that having it "pre-installed" would have an effect I think you miss the point where Linux distros that come "pre-installed" are also usually backed. I'm kinda skeptical that android would have become the success that it is if it wasn't backed by google and was a pure community os.

 

what hardware are you seeking drivers for? i popped in a usb printer/scanner that was made last year, and cups saw it, set it up, and was printing in about 5 minutes after taking out of its box.  but i have plenty of hardware laying around, that never got a windows 7 x86/x64 driver (or vista for that matter), that i still use, and it works in linux just as well.

 

btw, virtual dub only works in windows, as it relies heavily on the windows api, unless the author has changed that, it wont compile as is in linux, doesn't run in wine all that well either.

 

Most of the software you use that is Opensource, aren't specifically made for linux, they are just open source projects that most distro's build for their packages, and are well known.

 

I heard something similar to this article in the early 2000's, when Mac OS X came out. how Apple had beat linux to the desktop with a unix like OS and it was predicted back then that Apple would crush the linux market share, and all the Linux folks would flock in droves to Mac's...

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post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transhour View Post

what hardware are you seeking drivers for? i popped in a usb printer/scanner that was made last year, and cups saw it, set it up, and was printing in about 5 minutes after taking out of its box.  but i have plenty of hardware laying around, that never got a windows 7 x86/x64 driver (or vista for that matter), that i still use, and it works in linux just as well.

btw, virtual dub only works in windows, as it relies heavily on the windows api, unless the author has changed that, it wont compile as is in linux, doesn't run in wine all that well either.

Most of the software you use that is Opensource, aren't specifically made for linux, they are just open source projects that most distro's build for their packages, and are well known.

I heard something similar to this article in the early 2000's, when Mac OS X came out. how Apple had beat linux to the desktop with a unix like OS and it was predicted back then that Apple would crush the linux market share, and all the Linux folks would flock in droves to Mac's...

My mistake then. Not really on the up and up what is and isn't native Linux. Sill very useful software and they (excluding virtual dub then) should run on linux as there are linux versions of them but do not always do so. Again not really the OS's fault but reality. As for drivers I haven't tried to run any fresh hardware for a couple of years so perhaps the situation has improved but last time there was issues with some wireless adapters and sound cards.
    
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post #10 of 36
Linux will succeed when it's actually easy to use (when my grandma can set it up).
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