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SSD Write Amplification on non Sand Force drive?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
if you write data on ssd, it would actually be amplified meaning the file that gets written on the ssd is bigger which means more write is done

ssd's have limited Write life Cycle (3000 on 25nm)

sandforce controller uses lossless compression which reduces the write amplification which in theory should prolong the NAND on the drive



alot of popular drives AFAIK (Crucial M4, Samsung 830, Vertex 4, etc...) does not have any compression being done which means alot more data is being written on the ssd.


i look about write amplification or ssd endurance about those drives but found no info.


i recently have an SSD die on me and when its dead, it is completely dead meaning it is not detectable even on BIOS

i also read about other people's ssd dying on them as a result of no life left.



so my question is, how much Write life cycle are NON sandforce drives since it doesn't have any compression?
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post #2 of 6
As fore the dying, when the p\e cycles are depleted (worn out) etc then the drive will not just die, it will still remain readable. The disappearing from the bios generally means the controller has died., or something else has failed.

Drives without compression will range from 1 to about 5, but I dont know exact numbers, so you will have to wait for someone elses reply.
post #3 of 6
It really doesn't matter in any case, because the lifespan on any modern drive is going to greatly exceed what you care about. You can write gigabytes a day to them for years without running out of drive life - it's a total non-issue.

Drives disappearing is, as fox2 mentioned, a controller issue, not a drive life issue (which only impacts writes, not reads).
post #4 of 6
With the latest SSD's, the Write Amplification as long as TRIM is working is close to 1 and certainly not over 2. http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?271063-SSD-Write-Endurance-25nm-Vs-34nm halfway down this page is a graph with write amplifications for some SSD's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foX2delta777 View Post

As fore the dying, when the p\e cycles are depleted (worn out) etc then the drive will not just die, it will still remain readable. The disappearing from the bios generally means the controller has died., or something else has failed.

This is unfortunately not true. In the thread I linked, no SSD was still readable. All SSD's failed completely once they were worn out to much. It seems like that the read only promise was just a marketing trick or something.

Either way, Write Amplification is no issue with modern drives. If you buy a good SSD like the Samsung 830, Crucial M4 etc you will never wear out your SSD. In the thread on Xtremesystems they tested a Crucial M4 64GB with over 1.5PB or writes and a Samsung 830 256GB with over 4PB or writes and these drives are still working fine. This means that you have to write the entire size of the SSD multiple times a day (which you never ever will, even with high workloads) and these drives will still last you many years. For example, if you write 1TB per day to the Samsung 830, it will still last 10 years.
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conquistador SW View Post

With the latest SSD's, the Write Amplification as long as TRIM is working is close to 1 and certainly not over 2. http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?271063-SSD-Write-Endurance-25nm-Vs-34nm halfway down this page is a graph with write amplifications for some SSD's.
This is unfortunately not true. In the thread I linked, no SSD was still readable. All SSD's failed completely once they were worn out to much. It seems like that the read only promise was just a marketing trick or something.
Either way, Write Amplification is no issue with modern drives. If you buy a good SSD like the Samsung 830, Crucial M4 etc you will never wear out your SSD. In the thread on Xtremesystems they tested a Crucial M4 64GB with over 1.5PB or writes and a Samsung 830 256GB with over 4PB or writes and these drives are still working fine. This means that you have to write the entire size of the SSD multiple times a day (which you never ever will, even with high workloads) and these drives will still last you many years. For example, if you write 1TB per day to the Samsung 830, it will still last 10 years.

correct me if i am wrong but TRIM actually makes more writes to the drive to keep performance up(garbage collection)
Quote:
NAND can only be written/erased a finite number of times, aggressively cleaning NAND before it's absolutely necessary will keep write performance high at the expense of wearing out NAND quicker.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4010/kingston-ssdnow-v-plus-100-review
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post #6 of 6
I don't know where they are getting that from, because as you can see in the graph on XS and if you google it, every source explains that TRIM reduces write amplification.
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