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Is there not a sensible Linux desktop any more? - Page 2

post #11 of 32
I think you might be a good candidate for some sort of hybrid setup. I like the kwin on xfce setup idea; you could also do well with Mate or Cinnamon.
From here, there are more extensive options - Compiz Standalone with a panel (Tint2 etc.) is a great option for customization and feature sets for one you get all of the flexibility of whichever your favorite DE's panel is, and the usability and configuration of Compiz as a Window manager/decorator. You get Emerald themes, and all of Compiz's Window managment behaviors (Tiling options, plugins for further functionality, expose, multi monitor support, 3d effects, window snapping, quick resize gestures, commands and keybinds.) A great setup idea for those who like launchers for example is to use AWN or Cairo.

I think you have probably moved from being a mainstream computer user, who is dipping his feet into the Linux world (I.e. doesn't really know whether functionality is broken or working as intended, and doesn't care how things work past expecting it to work similar to Windows or OSX) to being a slightly more advanced user who wants more control over the functionality and design of his operating system, user interface included.
    
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post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xaero252 View Post

I think you might be a good candidate for some sort of hybrid setup. I like the kwin on xfce setup idea; you could also do well with Mate or Cinnamon.
From here, there are more extensive options - Compiz Standalone with a panel (Tint2 etc.) is a great option for customization and feature sets for one you get all of the flexibility of whichever your favorite DE's panel is, and the usability and configuration of Compiz as a Window manager/decorator. You get Emerald themes, and all of Compiz's Window managment behaviors (Tiling options, plugins for further functionality, expose, multi monitor support, 3d effects, window snapping, quick resize gestures, commands and keybinds.) A great setup idea for those who like launchers for example is to use AWN or Cairo.
I think you have probably moved from being a mainstream computer user, who is dipping his feet into the Linux world (I.e. doesn't really know whether functionality is broken or working as intended, and doesn't care how things work past expecting it to work similar to Windows or OSX) to being a slightly more advanced user who wants more control over the functionality and design of his operating system, user interface included.

Compiz Standalone would be a great candidate for him I think, with either a Tint panel, or an AWN/Docky dock ( they work great as panels ).
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Multi-monitor DWM / XMonad user here, not broken there or at all. Hideous is subjective, I like the more minimalistic window managers. They just take time for a normal desktop user to adjust to, and to hack and make their own, which is half the point of them.
And if you're taking DE's/WM's for their face value you'll likely never be happy. You can add tiling to just about any wm/de if it isn't included by default. Along with many other features.

This is so true, thumb.gif I actuallly registered to cheer this

I think after three years of, consequentially, gnome, kde, xfce, *boxes and kde4 eventually, I suddenly found myself so very comfortable with fvwm, and xmonad and windowmaker are waiting being given a shot... these little wm's have a certain beauty to them...
Strange, ... after having tried all the evolutions, thunderbirds and such, I also settled with emacs org-mode for the calendar and weekly agenda displayed via conky,... now it's the environment... smile.gif I'm not a fanboy but actually this virtual desktops thing would've saved me quite so much time a few years earlier, if I were aware...
Out of all the DEs out there I mostly prefer KDE's utils currently, their devs out there in my imagination are the thoughtful ones that kept certain small and specific but really useful things we don't usually need, but that actually made the difference for me,... job specific but added up they made my choice... Xfce and openbox are the second favourites
But currently yeah, I'm moving to "bare bones" as defined elsewhere because I seem to be another person who feels the need to run them wink.gif
post #14 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexx2005 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Multi-monitor DWM / XMonad user here, not broken there or at all. Hideous is subjective, I like the more minimalistic window managers. They just take time for a normal desktop user to adjust to, and to hack and make their own, which is half the point of them.
And if you're taking DE's/WM's for their face value you'll likely never be happy. You can add tiling to just about any wm/de if it isn't included by default. Along with many other features.

This is so true, thumb.gif I actuallly registered to cheer this

I think after three years of, consequentially, gnome, kde, xfce, *boxes and kde4 eventually, I suddenly found myself so very comfortable with fvwm, and xmonad and windowmaker are waiting being given a shot... these little wm's have a certain beauty to them...
Strange, ... after having tried all the evolutions, thunderbirds and such, I also settled with emacs org-mode for the calendar and weekly agenda displayed via conky,... now it's the environment... smile.gif I'm not a fanboy but actually this virtual desktops thing would've saved me quite so much time a few years earlier, if I were aware...
Out of all the DEs out there I mostly prefer KDE's utils currently, their devs out there in my imagination are the thoughtful ones that kept certain small and specific but really useful things we don't usually need, but that actually made the difference for me,... job specific but added up they made my choice... Xfce and openbox are the second favourites
But currently yeah, I'm moving to "bare bones" as defined elsewhere because I seem to be another person who feels the need to run them wink.gif

well welcome to OCN smile.gif I use Xfce myself atm but have used an openbox standalone many times in the past. going to try dwm again at some point as well
post #15 of 32
I currently have Mint with Cinnamon (Maya) on one machine . It is far more usable than Gnome 3 (shell) - or Unity but I still prefer Gnome2.x or Mate . I however feel that It would be worth a try for the OP as it might do what he is looking for .
post #16 of 32
Quote:
well welcome to OCN smile.gif I use Xfce myself atm but have used an openbox standalone many times in the past. going to try dwm again at some point as well

Thanks smile.gif) Yes, openbox is extremely nice once you get to know your way around in linux, alongside with xfce it actually was a life-saver when I had a much weaker pc and treasured the ram :-)

For the newcomers the spins of Cinnamon, Gnome2, or maybe xfce / compiz / kwin would be better, I agree (or a good kde 4.6+ stabilized release)
Edited by alexx2005 - 9/30/12 at 12:59pm
post #17 of 32
I'm new to Linux, and I went with Ubuntu to be "safe"... I haven't experienced any "glitch' issues, but your case may be the rig you installed it on.

What I kind of find interesting about your complaints regarding Xfce is the cosmetic aspect. I'm sure you're aware you can simply change the default look to whatever you'd prefer.

I've never used that version of Linux, but I have looked into it because I am thinking of giving it a try. One person reviewing actually made a comment about how crappy it looked but noted it could be easily changed.

I do agree on Gnome 3 though. I tried it out and wondered how people actually liked it. Sure, the desktop is clean looking... about the only quality it has imo.

Personally, I feel that if you plan to use Linux, you should expect to tweak things. Linux is not Windows. If you plan to install and go, then why complain about something you pad nothing for, especially if you're not even willing to do anything to make it better?

I'm not attacking you, btw. But, we all have to have realistic expectations about things. Nothing will be perfect without some effort.
post #18 of 32
@OP: Try Linux Mint 13 Mate - I've been with LM for about 6-7 years and am glad I stuck to it. It's easy to get used to, yet configurable if you want. Some other projects look interesting, such as Bodhi, but haven't tried it.

@Miki: I think the OP has given a nice contribution to the Linux dev community who sometimes seems a little lost. Ubuntu and later Linux Mint have made it easy for newcomers to switch to Linux. Giving new options is nice, but I would like to get down to work as fast as I can without having to learn my way around with new desktop interfaces and crazy GUIs.
It's about usability. For example, with a default Linux Mint installation you get everything most people ever need to get working or enjoying Linux - including "ugly" codecs to watch their favorite movies, as well as proprietary graphics drivers to actually make use of the GPU.
Now go try Debian, or Fedora, or many other distros. Of course you can later install the missing packages, but it's a pain in the neck.
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by powerhouse View Post

@Miki: I think the OP has given a nice contribution to the Linux dev community who sometimes seems a little lost. Ubuntu and later Linux Mint have made it easy for newcomers to switch to Linux. Giving new options is nice, but I would like to get down to work as fast as I can without having to learn my way around with new desktop interfaces and crazy GUIs.
It's about usability. For example, with a default Linux Mint installation you get everything most people ever need to get working or enjoying Linux - including "ugly" codecs to watch their favorite movies, as well as proprietary graphics drivers to actually make use of the GPU.
Now go try Debian, or Fedora, or many other distros. Of course you can later install the missing packages, but it's a pain in the neck.

Probably so. I'm no expert myself. I guess what I mean is to make issue about cosmetics of an OS that can be easily changed seems... redundant.

They can't please everyone, can they?

You make a great point though and I appreciate the insight.
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by bomfunk View Post

OpenBox was fantastic but root login/typing long and incomprehensible dbus strings just to sleep/hibernate isn't really my thing. Also no tiling.
The obscure ones (flvw, enlightenment, i3, xmonad, LXDE, whatever) are one or more of hideous, broken on multi-monitors, broken all over, unhelpful, useless.

Just out of morbid curiosity what has openbox got to do with the suspend functionality of your OS?

I run openbsd and CWM on my lappy, I love CWM its just pure awesome. I believe its been ported to Linux too, if anyone is interested I'll post my conf file. Some of the cool things with CWM is the quick key to ssh (alt + . then type the hostname) and the window groups i find is really useful.
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