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lisp help/discussion - Page 3

post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by {Unregistered} View Post

Learn Haskell instead. thumb.gif
why?
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

why?

It's like Lisp, but more refined and higher level and forces you to learn functional programming. And believe me...if you haven't had any experience with functional programming (or have had a bit too much experience with imperative/procedural programming), then you'll find it very hard.
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post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by {Unregistered} View Post

It's like Lisp, but more refined and higher level and forces you to learn functional programming. And believe me...if you haven't had any experience with functional programming (or have had a bit too much experience with imperative/procedural programming), then you'll find it very hard.

I see. I'll bare that in mind when (if) I eventually get round to a Lisp-like language.
Thank you smile.gif
post #24 of 31
I'd recommend lisp anyway. It has more real world usage.
In addition , my friends who know haskell say that parts of haskellmake it a difficult first functional language.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by hajile View Post

I'd recommend lisp anyway. It has more real world usage.
In addition , my friends who know haskell say that parts of haskellmake it a difficult first functional language.

Well if I learn list, it will be in view of writing better AI than the stuff I currently produce
post #26 of 31
Does anyone know of a free Lisp compiler? In one of my classes my prof basically said 'Here do this in Lisp' and I don't have anything for that besides Notepad++.
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post #27 of 31
Note: I know no Lisp.
Some googling brought me to http://www.clisp.org/
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZTR1760 View Post

Does anyone know of a free Lisp compiler? In one of my classes my prof basically said 'Here do this in Lisp' and I don't have anything for that besides Notepad++.
edit: this first part I wrote refers to Common Lisp

clisp (linked to above) is available in Windows, Lispworks or Allegro are the big names in the professional space (both offer their implementations for free for limited non-commercial use). SBCL (http://www.sbcl.org/) is probably the fastest non commercial lisp dialect (and faster than the commercial implementations according to some reports I've read), but the Windows version is still in development.

The development environment of choice for lisp is Emacs and SLIME which are free and work well on windows, but have a learning curve (some use Vim as well). On the flip side, once you start becoming familiar with Emacs (or Vim), you will never want to use something like Notepad++ again.

Edit: I didn't mention scheme
Lisp is a language type (if you would) and there are many different, incompatible languages that look and act similar, but use slightly different syntax (just like there many C-like languages which look similar, but have different syntax and ways of doing things).

If you're considering scheme, the "compiler" you should use is racket. There are others that are also good, but it has the best support, libraries, and documentation. Emacs/SLIME and Vim are still the preferred here.

A word on lisp compilers. Common Lisp (and scheme) compiles functions independently and then links them. Because of this, there isn't a need to separate the writing and compiling parts. You can have the program running and then decide to add/change a function while the program is still running. The compiler will compile that function (no need to recompile the others) and if necessary, overwrite the previous function (a basic way of looking at this is that functions are objects (data) and when one is called, it is given two pointers (the pointer of the function and the pointer to the beginning of the linked list of parameters)). Quite a number of realtime systems are programmed in lisp because the program can be updated as it runs resulting in less downtime (for those who would complain about bugs, the simple answer is side-effect free programming).
Edited by hajile - 2/18/13 at 8:12am
post #29 of 31
Thanks, I tried installing Emacs onto my machine and had some problems with it. But then I found TLisp, which is an online interpreter which works great for my purpose.

I just had one other question. Is there a specific way to start and/or end a lisp program? Or is it just like most languages where it just starts when you start it and ends when its finished computing.

My professor posed these questions and they threw me off as usually it ends...when its done....
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post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZTR1760 View Post

Thanks, I tried installing Emacs onto my machine and had some problems with it. But then I found TLisp, which is an online interpreter which works great for my purpose.

I just had one other question. Is there a specific way to start and/or end a lisp program? Or is it just like most languages where it just starts when you start it and ends when its finished computing.

My professor posed these questions and they threw me off as usually it ends...when its done....

Try following this how-to if you do want to give a real lisp environment a try (I don't do much with Windows and Lisp as I mostly use it in Linux, but it looks about right). TLisp is a decent enough learning tool, but you'll likely become frustrated that it doesn't have arrays.

As a side note, the interpreter runs as a Java applet. Find a way to download the applet, but you should NOT enable Java in your browser as there are currently a large number of nasty java exploits that Oracle hasn't patched.

To answer you last question, lisp is like most other languages and doesn't require special ways to start or end the programs. In larger, multi-file programs, there may be a specific need to set up namespaces and link the files together in the right order ( just like any other language ). In addition, the source may ultimately need some parameters set that tell the compiler how to optimize ( once again like most compiled languages ).
Edited by hajile - 2/19/13 at 2:39pm
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