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When can I say I "KNOW" a programming language? - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkArc View Post

Since I currently just went through this I figure I'll give my two cents. On my resume, I had stated that I was proficient in with Java, HTML, and C#. This is because I know the basics of all the languages and some in depth topics. If you want to say you are proficient with Java, make sure you understand OO concepts like polymorphism, encapsulation, etc. Then I also listed languages I have experience with, such as C++, Assembly, Perl, etc.

This is what I do as well.
    
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post #12 of 16
Although I know I'm different than many interviewers - for example I don't even consider education in my evaluation (or at the very least I consider it far less than experience even without an education) I would propose you simply consider your experience in terms that a likely employer would require. Do you feel confident that, given adequate time, you could create a small program that performed a simple task? For example could you write a mortgage calculator in that language? Or something that read tabular data from two sources and format the output in a meaningful way?

In most jobs the overall goal is not required from a single employee (at least not all at once) and it's much easier to gauge your proficiency in the same way that you undertake a large project - by breaking it into smaller, more manageable pieces. Most employers aren't looking for someone that could write enterprise-class software in a weekend without help (at least the realistic ones aren't) - but also aren't interested in hiring someone that has to be micro-managed to the point of being a tertiary educator. That's what interns are for. biggrin.gif

That being said, if you're very confident in your ability to adapt to a new environment, spend way more than the 40ish hours you are paid for getting up to speed by reading/researching skills outside of the office... I say "fake it until you make it"... Even if you wind up over-selling your skills and fall far enough behind in that job that you lose it - you'll still have gotten some real-world experience and have a much better idea of your strengths and weaknesses.

I can't speak for all employers but I know in my experience - I'd rather have to wait a little longer for results from someone who is self motivated and determined (and easy to get along with) than have the absolute best in their field that is egotistical, combative, and looking for better compensation before they finish their first week. Being a team player is usually way better than being a star player (at least until you decide to start your own company... then you probably have to try to be both).

Just my .02 (and no, unfortunately I'm not in a financial position to be hiring anyone at the moment). redface.gif
post #13 of 16
I usually put a language in the "Proficient" category when I am comfortable manipulating with various data structures (Sets, maps, hash, binary trees, array, etc..), file input/output, and the OO design about the language if it's an OO language. If I spent more than 40+ hours working with a language, or have written some small programs in it, I would put it in the "Familiar with" category. biggrin.gif
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post #14 of 16
When you know you know, then you know.
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post #15 of 16
I usually just list languages in order of proficiency and importance.

One you have a grounding, most languages can be picked up pretty easily, and even some of the best developers in their fields rely on resource manuals rather than committing everything to memory. So as I know enough to work independently (and by that, I mean I understand enough to fix my own problems rather than having to ask for advice), then I'd put it down.

Or to put it another way, I would never apply for a programming job if I didn't feel like I could program in that language.
post #16 of 16
If you going for an intership and are still at school then just put whatever languages you have used in your course. Maybe add the units you have completed as well.

GL thumb.gif
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