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A Month Of Linux (Ubuntu 12.04 and LMDE) - Page 2

post #11 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by theonedub View Post

A complete beginner would need longer to get it done. The first temp program that popped up from the Ubuntu Center for me was PSensor. Installing it from the software center on a clean install of 12.04 gives you CPU Usage, no other temperatures or readings. So then you have to go to the terminal, install the right sensor package, run it, scan, add, reboot- and that doesn't even include the time spent Googling all the instructions.

This is true, it will most likely take me a little bit of time to learn new things, but that is only because I like to research it enough to were I will have a complete understanding of it, rather than just copy and paste what a website tells me to do! lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by dklic6 View Post

Check out WINE / wine tricks early in case you get the urge to play a couple games. You won't be tempted to sneak windows time in there.

Yes, Wine is very high on the priority list for that precise reason, however because most of the new games out have had no luck in holding my attention, I am not all to worried... But I appreciate the advice! thumb.gif
post #12 of 66
biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by theonedub View Post

A complete beginner would need longer to get it done. The first temp program that popped up from the Ubuntu Center for me was PSensor. Installing it from the software center on a clean install of 12.04 gives you CPU Usage, no other temperatures or readings. So then you have to go to the terminal, install the right sensor package, run it, scan, add, reboot- and that doesn't even include the time spent Googling all the instructions.

To be clear, that's the one I used. For my hardware, there was nothing special that I needed to do. Just answer a few questions during setup and it was running with sensors that I mentioned above. Not sure what the difference is when you tried it, but I found it very simple.
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post #13 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kremtok View Post

biggrin.gif
To be clear, that's the one I used. For my hardware, there was nothing special that I needed to do. Just answer a few questions during setup and it was running with sensors that I mentioned above. Not sure what the difference is when you tried it, but I found it very simple.

I can almost assure you that I am not as talented as you most likely are with computers lol! It could be the simplest task in the world and I will find some way to take forever getting it right haha but once I figure it out, I will always remember how to do it! redface.gif
post #14 of 66
sudo apt-get install lm-sensors... password
sudo sensors-detect password....
y
y
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y
y
y
y
y
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y
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y
y
y
y
y
y
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lol
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post #15 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dklic6 View Post

sudo apt-get install lm-sensors... password
sudo sensors-detect password....
lol

I am hoping by the end of this month, these kind of jokes will actually provoke laughter from me, rather than confusion haha thumb.gif
post #16 of 66
It's pretty simple:
sudo = act as admin basically ("Super User DO" - sounds a little gangster)
apt = aptitude which is like the wal-mart of software
apt-get = go to walmart and get what you need
install = you can figure that one out
lm-sensors = the temperature package/software you want to install


So it all makes sense now: You're telling your computer to download and install the lm-sensors program
sudo apt-get install lm-sensors

the real joke is the y y y y y y y y y when you detect all the sensors on your hardware. You really don't want to y y y y y y all the way down (hasn't worked well for me).



This is really one noob to another. I'm not very experienced with Linux and I'm learning too. Remember that Linux is case sensitive too.

/home/user/Downloads/ does not equal /home/user/downloads/
Edited by dklic6 - 10/12/12 at 1:57am
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post #17 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dklic6 View Post

It's pretty simple:
sudo = act as admin basically ("Super User DO" - sounds a little gangster)
apt = aptitude which is like the wal-mart of software
apt-get = go to walmart and get what you need
install = you can figure that one out
lm-sensors = the temperature package/software you want to install
So it all makes sense now: You're telling your computer to download and install the lm-sensors program
sudo apt-get install lm-sensors
the real joke is the y y y y y y y y y when you detect all the sensors on your hardware. You really don't want to y y y y y y all the way down (hasn't worked well for me).

Aw ok! Perfect explanation, it helps to see things broken down like that! thumb.gif
post #18 of 66
About 5-6 months into Linux myself. Have to admit, I've learned more about computers, and probably more about anything, in these past several months.


One thing I did for the first couple months was break my linux install. Sometimes three times a day. Ultimately resulting in a reinstall.

Take the installer's advise when it says separating '/' and '/home' is a common practice, and a good idea to do.
Try out btrfs as your filesystem. Despite what people say, I've found it to be the quickest, and most stable.


Also, I'd suggest dropping Ubuntu, and installing Linux Mint. (Either LMDE, or Regular)

Since you're obviously a logical creature, and require reasoning, I will explain why Linux Mint is a better choice list format.

[Linux Mint Regular]
--Linux Mint is essentially Ubuntu. (All of the applications on Ubuntu work on Mint)

--You can utilize all of the documentation of Ubuntu

--Mint's GUI (cinnamon) looks very good, and uses a quarter of explorer.exe's resources.

--Ubuntu is becoming VERY commercial oriented for a Linux desktop distro.

--The software center feels more organized and doesn't try to sell you crap.


[LMDE]
--LMDE is essentially Debian, Debian software works flawlessly, though you cannot use Ubuntu specific .deb files in it.

--Documentation for Debian is a bit less noob-friendly. but packed with very useful, elite info.

--LMDE benefits from Debian's rolling release system. (you don't have to reinstall when the next version is released, as you get updates constantly ie. rolling)

--Debian has by far the largest collection of rock solid stable software and tools. The operating system is the most prestigious Linux distro to date.



There are other reason, but I can't think of any.
I need some sleep.

~/
post #19 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hydranix View Post

About 5-6 months into Linux myself. Have to admit, I've learned more about computers, and probably more about anything, in these past several months.
One thing I did for the first couple months was break my linux install. Sometimes three times a day. Ultimately resulting in a reinstall.
Take the installer's advise when it says separating '/' and '/home' is a common practice, and a good idea to do.
Try out btrfs as your filesystem. Despite what people say, I've found it to be the quickest, and most stable.
Also, I'd suggest dropping Ubuntu, and installing Linux Mint. (Either LMDE, or Regular)
Since you're obviously a logical creature, and require reasoning, I will explain why Linux Mint is a better choice list format.
[Linux Mint Regular]
--Linux Mint is essentially Ubuntu. (All of the applications on Ubuntu work on Mint)
--You can utilize all of the documentation of Ubuntu
--Mint's GUI (cinnamon) looks very good, and uses a quarter of explorer.exe's resources.
--Ubuntu is becoming VERY commercial oriented for a Linux desktop distro.
--The software center feels more organized and doesn't try to sell you crap.
[LMDE]
--LMDE is essentially Debian, Debian software works flawlessly, though you cannot use Ubuntu specific .deb files in it.
--Documentation for Debian is a bit less noob-friendly. but packed with very useful, elite info.
--LMDE benefits from Debian's rolling release system. (you don't have to reinstall when the next version is released, as you get updates constantly ie. rolling)
--Debian has by far the largest collection of rock solid stable software and tools. The operating system is the most prestigious Linux distro to date.
There are other reason, but I can't think of any.
I need some sleep.
~/

This is all very helpful information. Linux Mint was my other choice. I think I am going to install both on my hard drive and use both to see which I prefer. I guess I am also wondering what was the hardest part of learning Linux for you guys? Any useful Linux anecdotes are welcome smile.gif
post #20 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by STRYK View Post

This is all very helpful information. Linux Mint was my other choice. I think I am going to install both on my hard drive and use both to see which I prefer. I guess I am also wondering what was the hardest part of learning Linux for you guys? Any useful Linux anecdotes are welcome smile.gif
One hard one for me is sometimes a distro just will not work. I tend to favor Arch Linux or Gentoo (neither are for beginners), but I wanted to see how Ubuntu would respond on my system. It would boot the LIVE CD perfectly, but when it came to being installed with NVIDIA drivers, I couldn't get it to boot. It was a Plymouth error that I was never able to resolve (aside from disabling the proprietary driver blob). So I gave up on Ubuntu. The latest LTS version is running fine on my laptop, however, so YMMV. So sometimes, it's the distro lol. thumb.gif
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