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Seems like it's time to move to linux... - Page 4

post #31 of 49
Thread Starter 
Ok, The installation went fairly easily, ANd a fresh install on an old mechanical drive feels quite snappy, First questions

Why does pressing the X on windows not close them.. Fixed that, Herp my mouse locks buttons when i press a specific button (mmo 7)

Wheres the device manager so i can find a list of things i need to find drivers for

That's all i got so far
Edited by Rayleyne - 10/12/12 at 10:21am
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post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evil Penguin View Post

People generally go by how it's pre-configured when making those statements.

Which is why I always suggest a solid base, and always remind them the GUI's are as easy and quick to change as a snap of the fingers.

It usually sends people in with a much more confident mindset then giving them hundreds of distro's with preconfigured desktop environments. You give people too many options they become a bit self-concious, and make the decision and decisions later, that much harder. smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayleyne View Post

Ok, The installation went fairly easily, ANd a fresh install on an old mechanical drive feels quite snappy, First questions
Why does pressing the X on windows close them..
Wheres the device manager so i can find a list of things i need to find drivers for
That's all i got so far

Do you mean the key " X " or the button " X " in the top left/right corner? The former would be a bit off, the later is well.. the close button.

Linux is good at making mech drives feel lively biggrin.gif

There is no device manager persay to tell you if drivers are needed or not ( at least I don't know of a GUI way to do it as I'm more of a CLI guy ).
Edited by Shrak - 10/11/12 at 9:32pm
post #33 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Which is why I always suggest a solid base, and always remind them the GUI's are as easy and quick to change as a snap of the fingers.
It usually sends people in with a much more confident mindset then giving them hundreds of distro's with preconfigured desktop environments. You give people too many options they become a bit self-concious, and make the decision and decisions later, that much harder. smile.gif
Do you mean the key " X " or the button " X " in the top left/right corner? The former would be a bit off, the later is well.. the close button.
Linux is good at making mech drives feel lively biggrin.gif
There is no device manager persay to tell you if drivers are needed or not ( at least I don't know of a GUI way to do it as I'm more of a CLI guy ).


I had mouse lock turned on, on my mmo 7 so it tends to not allow you to use the buttons that are locked, though it seems a bit finicky, My internet connections working so obviously it knows how to use either my onboard, or dedicated gigabit nic (It's a long story as to why i have 2), downloading the video drivers "Amd proprietary x86 and x64 linux 12.8" as to how to install them, Well it comes in a zip file..


It has an icon, And says both my Gigabit connections are working
They being "Intel 82574L and 82579V


Driver for video downloaded, Extracted, it's a .run file, I double clicked it..

"could not open the file /home/name/desktop/blahblahblahblah.run using the unicode utf-8 character encoding"

Using googlefu, I see i'm supposed to run this in a terminal, right click, run in terminal brings up "Do you want to run blah blah blah or display its contents"

I choose run in terminal and nothing happens.

Wait no i got it, I got it, need to run this as a super user (no idea how to do that)
Edited by Rayleyne - 10/11/12 at 9:49pm
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post #34 of 49
My guess is that you haven't logged into root yet.

To do so,
issue a 'sudo'

You'll have to use sudo and authenticate to perform most administrator based actions on a UNIX system.
post #35 of 49
I suggest installing AMD's Radeon drivers through the package manager.
Search for FGLRX.

Make sure your system is fully updated first.
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post #36 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stealthybox View Post

My guess is that you haven't logged into root yet.
To do so,
issue a 'sudo'
You'll have to use sudo and authenticate to perform most administrator based actions on a UNIX system.

I'm assuming that's done in the terminal, wich looks an aweful lot like command prompt from windows, Except it's white, this is the part where you treat me like a retard because, i have no idea what i'm doing though i've somehow stumbled my way through downloading and installing wine 1.4.1


Oh hey seems like i stumbled through it, apparently the command is sudo /directorynames/filename


Why doesn't my mouse work when it comes to clicking on certain things, as in i can open menu just fine unless another program or the terminal is up, And when it comes to installing the display driver, It won't click on the continue button
Edited by Rayleyne - 10/11/12 at 10:30pm
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post #37 of 49
A lot of the software can be installed through a graphical tool. It is called Software Manager on Mint and Software Centre on Ubuntu.

sudo is used to execute commands as another user such as root. sudo is usually defaulted to root (admin) user.

An example of a command used in Ubuntu with sudo is: sudo apt-get update

then you enter your user password to temporarily execute that apt-get update command as a root user.

In Linux Mint Debian Edition and other Linux distros, they may use something different from sudo iirc. They use su.

su is similar to sudo except you type su, enter the password of the root account, and then type the command such as apt-get update. (On Mint and Ubuntu, root password is same as user password. Other Linux distros may have a separate root password.) Some people prefer sudo or su although I do not really have any strong opinion towards either method.

This may explain it better:
http://www.howtogeek.com/111479/htg-explains-whats-the-difference-between-sudo-su/
Edited by Riou - 10/11/12 at 10:41pm
post #38 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riou View Post

A lot of the software can be installed through a graphical tool. It is called Software Manager on Mint and Software Centre on Ubuntu.
sudo is used to execute commands as another user such as root. sudo is usually defaulted to root (admin) user.
An example of a command used in Ubuntu with sudo is: sudo apt-get update
then you enter your user password to temporarily execute that apt-get update command as a root user.
In Linux Mint Debian Edition and other Linux distros, they may use something different from sudo iirc. They use su.
su is similar to sudo except you type su, enter the password of the root account, and then type the command such as apt-get update. (On Mint and Ubuntu, root password is same as user password. Other Linux distros may have a separate root password.) Some people prefer sudo or su although I do not really have any strong opinion towards either method.
This may explain it better:
http://www.howtogeek.com/111479/htg-explains-whats-the-difference-between-sudo-su/

That makes life a bit easier, But this one uses sudo, I promise not to ask too many bad questions, Doesn't solve the mouse problem though, And that doesn't tell me how to install my driver.
Edited by Rayleyne - 10/11/12 at 11:03pm
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post #39 of 49
Thread Starter 
Ok, I've weezled my way through ATI driver installation, That was certainly fun and somewhat interesting, Relativly easy once you've done it once, Alas i am still having mouse issues.
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post #40 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riou View Post

sudo is used to execute commands as another user such as root. sudo is usually defaulted to root (admin) user.

An example of a command used in Ubuntu with sudo is: sudo apt-get update

In Linux Mint Debian Edition and other Linux distros, they may use something different from sudo iirc. They use su.

su is similar to sudo except you type su, enter the password of the root account, and then type the command such as apt-get update. (On Mint and Ubuntu, root password is same as user password. Other Linux distros may have a separate root password.) Some people prefer sudo or su although I do not really have any strong opinion towards either method.

This may explain it better:
http://www.howtogeek.com/111479/htg-explains-whats-the-difference-between-sudo-su/
Everything uses su, it's the default command to elevate privileges.Sudo just allows for a regular user in a closed environment to have elevated privileges without needing the root password.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayleyne View Post

Ok, I've weezled my way through ATI driver installation, That was certainly fun and somewhat interesting, Relativly easy once you've done it once, Alas i am still having mouse issues.
What kind of issues?

off-topic: personally I think you should have used OpenSUSE or Fedora.
Edited by wizardskill - 10/12/12 at 1:37pm
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