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Which CPU should I get for my new rig?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
So next year I am thinking about building a more high end system then I currently have, the problem is I cant decide on which processor to choose.

Which one should I go with? : The 3770k or the 3930k.

What I play on this computer: Flight Simulator X with addons, Bus cablecar simulator, Fallout 3 and new vegas, portal 2, Battlefield 3, and Cod Black ops and MW3.


Here is what my plan for a build currently with both processors:
Intel I7 3770K 3.5-3.9
6copper heat pipe cooler master fan
Asus P8Z77-V motherboard
16gb 1600 ddr3 ram
GtX 670 or 680
250 kingston hyper x ssd
wd 1tb black hdd
Cooler master 1000w power supply.
Coolermaster HAF X Case

Intel Core I7 3930K six core
4 copper heat pipe cooler master fan
Asus sabertooth x79
16gb 1033 ddr3 ram
gtx 670
120 ssd kingston hyper x
1tb wd green
1000W cooler master power supply.
Cooler master HAF X Case

So which build should I go with? and also tell me if anything would bottleneck also so I can adjust it and also give some suggestions to. I am all open ears for what everyone has to say so go ahead and respond!
Edited by Vicpdx19 - 10/15/12 at 7:42pm
post #2 of 10
You will benefit from the 3770k's hyperthreading abilities. The 3930k can overclock much better, but the IPC (instructions per clock) is improved on Ivy Bridge.

Definitely the 3770k.
post #3 of 10
Next year? If you're going to wait that long to buy a new system, why not wait for Haswell to come out before planning a build?
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Beestje 2.0
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Well Mabey the cost of ivy bridge will go down and I could get that instead. But for now I have a core 2 duo
post #5 of 10
Really no point in speccing out a build now if you aren't buying until next year. Too many things can change with prices or new products to make it worthwhile.
post #6 of 10
I would just wait and see. Who knows intel could release a new chipset or maybe 2 within the year.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by OverClocker55 View Post

I would just wait and see. Who knows intel could release a new chipset or maybe 2 within the year.

This ^^^ will probably be the case
i would say Intel will make a new chipset as haswell is on a new socket the lga1150 and i believe they will have an 8-series chipset..

going on previous history even for the release of IB-E tho still the same socket as SB-E will release new boards with new chipsets for IB-E as well smile.gif
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Going to be chaep
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Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Plextor M5p 128GB 2 x WD 500GB Blues LG Prolimatech Megahalems Rev C 
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Arctic F12 CO PWM x 2 Push/Pull Windows 7 64 bit Ultimate LG IPS235V Corsair AX850 
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post #8 of 10
Ivy Bridge may have a higher IPC than Sandy Bridge-E (rather, 3770K vs 3930K), but the i7-3930K has two more cores, each supporting HyperThreading. The only reason to worry about IPC would be if you have programs that use huge amounts of processor time and are single-threaded. Anything multi-threaded will give you a lot better performance on a 6-core CPU so long as the IPCs are relatively close (which they are in this case).
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Oh Ok I see what you mean! Anyone want to tell me how my theory build's are? And also how would Flight simulator X work on both builds? Which one would be the best for FSX?

*Note: The builds stated are in theory if I were to purchase one of them now.
post #10 of 10
I don't have any clue what FSX requires, so I can't give you any ideas as to what you need in a system to get the best performance from that game. My guess is that either one of these processors is more than you need to play Flight Simulator X. My guess is that an i5-3570K and a GTX 670 would be able to run that game on the highest setting at a great framerate, so either one of these computers would allow you to play the game on max with a huge number of fps, all while recording and streaming your screen live. I sort of doubt that you would be able to tell much of a difference between the two systems as you played games, but you would notice a performance boost with the 3930K system if you were converting a movie from DVD or Blu-Ray to play on your iPhone/Android phone later.


Here are my personal build suggestions. I have no experience with the Ivy Bridge or Sandy Bridge processors, so anything I recommend will likely just be second-hand knowledge from reading these forums.

For the 3770K build:
> Intel I7 3770K 3.5-3.9
This is the CPU I would have chosen if for some reason I had decided against the 3930K. It gives you the best performance you can expect from a normal consumer-class processor, and it also has better power efficiency compared to the 2600K.

> 6copper heat pipe cooler master fan
This doesn't give me a lot to go on, so I'll just leave you with a recommendation... If you plan on running at stock frequency, then you can just use the stock cooler. I assume that you're not going to stay at stock, though. When it comes to Ivy Bridge processors, you have to plan ahead of time based on how aggressively you want to overclock. If you want to push on past 4.5GHz, then you're probably going to end up not being happy with anything less than liquid cooling. You could start with a Corsair H100 and do just fine, but if you want to go extreme, you're going to end up with a custom loop.

If you are going to just go for a moderate overclock, you could grab one of the Noctua NH-D14 air coolers and get performance that borders on the performance of the Corsair H100. Just don't expect to go much past 4.5GHz, simply because the IB processor line's heat output ramps up much faster than the Sandy Bridge line. Of course, it is possible to go past 4.5GHz on air for some processors, but that really depend on how lucky you are, and whether you end up with one of the higher-quality CPUs.

> Asus P8Z77-V motherboard
I can't make any recommendations for LGA 1155 motherboards. I will say that I really like Asus boards for their features and the bundled software that comes with them.

> 16gb 1600 ddr3 ram
I like the idea of getting 16GB of memory to start with. It's not at all needed for most uses, but Adobe's photo and video editing software benefits greatly from large amounts of RAM. The large amount of memory also helps keep your computer from swapping unused chunks of memory off to the hard drive, which is extremely slow for spinning disks, and causes solid state drives to wear out faster.

I also recommend that you get a 2 x 8GB kit rather than a 4 x 4GB kit. The fewer DIMMs, the more likely you will be successful if you decide to overclock your memory, because it is less likely that one of your DIMMs is too low a quality to handle the overclock. It also allows you to upgrade to the maximum amount of memory that your motherboard supports, since you are using the largest capacity DIMMs that the current desktop boards support.

> GtX 670 or 680
I love NVidia. I stopped using ATI/AMD cards ages ago, and I'm sure they've fixed the problems I had with them ages ago when I decided that ATI was crap, but I have never found a reason to give up on NVidia. When it comes to card companies, I generally try to go with EVGA or Asus, in that order.

> 250 kingston hyper x ssd
I am in the market for a large SSD right now, and I have decided that I will be getting one of the Samsung 830 series SSDs as soon as I have the money saved up. The Mushkin Enhanced Chronos Deluxe, Crucial M4, OCZ Vertex 4 (not any other OCZ line... just the Vertex4 line), and a coupleof other lines are being recommended these days. The Samsung 830 series, though, seems to be considered the highest quality SSD line on the market right now, and they also have fantastic performance.

> wd 1tb black hdd
Western Digital's Caviar Black series drives are a good choice. They come with a 5 year warranty, which is the longest in the industry, and the warranty covers desktop RAID use, which many warranties do not cover. The only drive I would recommend over the Caviar Black series are WD's RE4 drives. They have the same 5yr warranty, but they are specifically designed to be placed in RAID enclosures and they have error correction settings in place that drastically improve RAID performance in case an error occurs. The RE4 drives are only SATA2, but SATA3's higher transfer speeds can't be utilized by a single spinning disk drive, so they perform just as well or better than the Caviar Black drives do.

> Cooler master 1000w power supply.
I would recommend a Seasonic, Corsair, or XFX power supply. They offer the best reliability, and you will want to get the best PSU possible to protect your expensive parts from power spikes and voltage swings. 1000W is probably far more than you need unless you plan on upgrading to three or four GPUs in the future. I'm considering getting one of the Seasonic 860W 80Plus Platinum power supplies because I want to try to improve the electrical efficiency of my system to lower the amount of heat it puts off. 80Plus Gold would also be fine I guess, but I don't mind paying or the highest quality I can find.

> Coolermaster HAF X Case
A case is very much a personal decision. I haven't ever been able to examine any of these HAF cases personally. I'm planning on upgrading to an NZXT Switch 810 case eventually, just because it has excellent support for mounting water cooling radiators.



For the 3930K build:
> Intel Core I7 3930K six core
I ended up settling on this processor because I do a lot of graphic design, video transcoding, and virtualization work with my PC. This is absolutely what you want if you want to build a home PC with the highest processor power available without having to buy server/workstation equipment (which is far more expensive).

> 4 copper heat pipe cooler master fan
The SB-E line of processors do not come with CPU coolers, so you do have to buy an "aftermarket" cooler. If you want something to handle stock frequencies, I suggest the Cooler Master Hyper212 EVO. This is what I got when I first bought my parts because it was the cheapest thing I could find that had excellent reviews. I can get my 3930K up to 4.3GHz on this cooler, but I don't like to push my CPU using this cooler. Again, I would suggest a Corsair H100 or a custom water cooling loop if you want to do any serious overclocking with this chip. It puts off a tremendous amount of heat when you run it hard, and ever more when you overclock it. It doesn't ramp up in heat output as fast as the IB chips do, but it does put off lot of heat simply because it is basically one and a half of those 2600Ks.

> Asus sabertooth x79
I chose the Asus P9X79 Deluxe because it was a good board and offered wireless-n and bluetooth on the board itself. I would have had to buy a new wireless LAN card if I hadn't chosen the Deluxe because my old card was PCI, and most X79 boards don't have any PCI slots. If you don't need the flashy features, and you are buying a case at the same time as the motherboard, I would have chosen the P9X79 WS, which is basically the same board, but has slightly better overclock performance and offers better support for hardware RAID controllers and server LAN cards. The only odd thing is that the WS board has a workstation form factor... not ATX. If you want to go nuts with overclocking, then you should probably go with the Asus Rampage IV Extreme, though.

> 16gb 1033 ddr3 ram
The same concepts apply here as they do with your 3770K build, but I would suggest that you go with a 32GB 4 x 8GB kit. That would allow you to properly utilize the advantages of the quad-channel memory controller in the 3930K. I bought the Mushkin Enhanced Redline 32GB (4 x 8GB) 1866 MHz kit because it offered a good speed boost and runs at 1866MHz at 1.5v. These DIMMs probably have some room to overclock for tighter timings or a boost in frequency.

> gtx 670
The 3930K does not have an integrated graphics processor, so you do have to buy a discrete GPU. If I hadn't already had a great GPU, I would have probably bought an EVGA GTX 670 (the superclocked edition if they still offer the factory-overclocked cards), but I already have the EVGA GTX 470 SC 1280MB GDDR5. If you're going crazy with NVidia 3D Vision or getting a huge WQHD resolution display, then you might be better served by getting a GTX 680 or a second GTX 670, but you can probably do just fine with max settings on a GTX 670.

> 1tb wd green
I would recommend that you stay away from those "Green" drives. They will spin down after being idle for a short period of time to save power, which means that they have to spin back up when you need to use them. It gets really annoying after a while. I don't think they come with the 5 year warranty, either.

Everything else that applies to the 3770K build applies here when it comes to SSDs and PSUs.
Edited by N0BOX - 10/21/12 at 12:09am
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