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[OFFICIAL] FX-8320/FX-8350 Vishera Owners Club - Page 1698

post #16971 of 63685
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Originally Posted by Red1776 View Post

I had that thought the other night. Are you sure about that?

I ran quadfire on air for a bit before putting blocks on them and they ran at 85c and turned the room into a sauna. Now with water cooling they only get to 37c and have little effect on the room ambient temp. I mean can fans blowing 85c air off the HS into the room be the same as fans blowing 37c air off the rad fins?
I mean a components that does not reach the warmer temperature is producing less resistance which creates heat (and more power draw) so if the components is creating less resistance and pulling less energy, and not reaching the same high temperature, would the effect on the ambient temp be less?
I think my brain is smoking.biggrin.gif

Hmm, good point. So a 125 TDP Cpu is going to output the same amount of heat but room temp is affected by how many BTU's your cooler is able to handle, it would be nice to see such an equation for cooling units.
post #16972 of 63685
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red1776 View Post

I had that thought the other night. Are you sure about that?

I ran quadfire on air for a bit before putting blocks on them and they ran at 85c and turned the room into a sauna. Now with water cooling they only get to 37c and have little effect on the room ambient temp. I mean can fans blowing 85c air off the HS into the room be the same as fans blowing 37c air off the rad fins?
I mean a components that does not reach the warmer temperature is producing less resistance which creates heat (and more power draw) so if the components is creating less resistance and pulling less energy, and not reaching the same high temperature, would the effect on the ambient temp be less?
I think my brain is smoking.biggrin.gif

from a thermal dynamics standpoint, that is impossible. The same amount of heat is being dissipated. Now unless your radiators are not located in your room that your describing would be the only way you would experience those results.
post #16973 of 63685
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorderrorprone4 View Post

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Hmm, good point. So a 125 TDP Cpu is going to output the same amount of heat but room temp is affected by how many BTU's your cooler is able to handle, it would be nice to see such an equation for cooling units.
I can run some numbers if you would like. I'm a mechanical engineering student. There are a lot of variables but for one to actually feel the heat from air coolers as opposed to water, remember that the convection coefficient of water is many magnitudes better than air (basically a measure of the ability of a fluid to transfer heat). In fact, air is regarded as the worst possible fluid to use to transfer heat, but obviously it is abundant.
post #16974 of 63685
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Originally Posted by bond32 View Post

I can run some numbers if you would like. I'm a mechanical engineering student. There are a lot of variables but for one to actually feel the heat from air coolers as opposed to water, remember that the convection coefficient of water is many magnitudes better than air (basically a measure of the ability of a fluid to transfer heat). In fact, air is regarded as the worst possible fluid to use to transfer heat, but obviously it is abundant.

I mean't as a standard.
post #16975 of 63685
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorderrorprone4 View Post

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I mean't as a standard.

I'm not sure I follow what you're asking. When considering simply what heat goes from the cpu to the ambient, it's just too many things involved. Huge area the heat goes to as well as that heat is lost to any area of cooler temperature inside and out.

If you're curious about the effectiveness of water vs air, consider an air cooler. Heat from the cpu is dispersed by many fins straight to air with a terribly low convection coefficient. Now consider water where conduction occurs to copper, then convection to the working fluid (water, brine, etc), then convection again to air through a much larger surface area.
post #16976 of 63685
Quote:
Originally Posted by bond32 View Post

I can run some numbers if you would like. I'm a mechanical engineering student. There are a lot of variables but for one to actually feel the heat from air coolers as opposed to water, remember that the convection coefficient of water is many magnitudes better than air (basically a measure of the ability of a fluid to transfer heat). In fact, air is regarded as the worst possible fluid to use to transfer heat, but obviously it is abundant.

Yes water removes heat much faster than air. Hence why water cooling is more effective than air cooling. However the same amount of heat is being put into the surrounding air. So unless the heat exchange is happening somewhere else other than the room his computer is in both cooling methods will provide the same delta temperature increase.

Nice your a fellow ME guy, I'm a MAE guy (mechanical and aerospace engineer) Though I already have my degree thumb.gif
post #16977 of 63685
Nice. Yeah I graduate next spring. Pretty excited too. I'll most likely be in Hvac
post #16978 of 63685
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebduncan View Post

Yes water removes heat much faster than air. Hence why water cooling is more effective than air cooling. However the same amount of heat is being put into the surrounding air. So unless the heat exchange is happening somewhere else other than the room his computer is in both cooling methods will provide the same delta temperature increase.

Nice your a fellow ME guy, I'm a MAE guy (mechanical and aerospace engineer) Though I already have my degree thumb.gif

not quite as the air blowing through the rad stays much cooler than the air blowing through the heatsink.. In addition once the water hits peak temp you are blow same ammount of heat minus the heat added due to resistance as the water keeps cooler,, so less heat = less resistance = cooler temps = less heat to disapate
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Wet Billy
(15 items)
 
PHENOM Phoenix
(13 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD FX 8350 @ 5.06GHz AsUS Sabertooth R2.0 xfx 280x DD Crucial Ballistex Tactical Tracer 1866Mhz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingCooling
Samsung 830 SSD 128GB LG BD-ROM/DVD Rewriter XSPC Raystorm RS240 kit A LOT OF FANS 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
WIN 7 ultamate AOC 23" LED LCD Microsoft wireless laser 6000 Rosewill Capstone 750w 
CaseMouseMouse Pad
Coolermaster HAF 912 Microsoft wireless laser 6000 none 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
phenom II x6 1100T MSI 990FXA-GD65 GTX 460 GTX 460 
RAMHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Crucial Ballistix Tactical Tracer 8GB (2 x 4GB)... Samsung SSD 830  LG Blueray Coolermaster N520 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Win 7 Ultimate x64 AOC 1080p LED Microsoft OCZ 850w 
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Coolermaster HAF 912 
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post #16979 of 63685
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Originally Posted by bond32 View Post

I'm not sure I follow what you're asking. When considering simply what heat goes from the cpu to the ambient, it's just too many things involved. Huge area the heat goes to as well as that heat is lost to any area of cooler temperature inside and out.

If you're curious about the effectiveness of water vs air, consider an air cooler. Heat from the cpu is dispersed by many fins straight to air with a terribly low convection coefficient. Now consider water where conduction occurs to copper, then convection to the working fluid (water, brine, etc), then convection again to air through a much larger surface area.

You know how an A/C's ability is measured in BTUs, that would be nice for CPU coolers. Something like this cooler dissipates xxx amount of BTUs at 75 degrees room temperature. You could even add in a 10' by 10' room if you really want to get that precise.
post #16980 of 63685
Quote:
Originally Posted by F3ERS 2 ASH3S View Post

not quite as the air blowing through the rad stays much cooler than the air blowing through the heatsink.. In addition once the water hits peak temp you are blow same ammount of heat minus the heat added due to resistance as the water keeps cooler,, so less heat = less resistance = cooler temps = less heat to disapate
No one is mentioning anything about time. Ebduncan is right, the same amount of heat will be dumped to the ambient except it's much quicker when there is no medium like water.
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