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[OFFICIAL] FX-8320/FX-8350 Vishera Owners Club - Page 6762

post #67611 of 67694
change LLC to auto or extreme

change core control to manual and set all to enabled

change nb link speed up to 2400

get rid of the negative voltage for cpu and cpu/nb (i have mine set to 1.380 which is basically stock volts)

set cool and quiet to disabled

if its stable with all of those settings then you can increase the core multipler from 20 to 21 for a 200MHz overclock (basically running all cores at the standard 4.2GHz boost speed) and that should be easy to cool with even the stock cooler, of course if you go aio then you can probably pump that up to about 4.5GHz with volts at 1.425

of ocurse if your mobo is weak then you will struggle and possibly kill it and the cpu if try to push the overclock /
post #67612 of 67694
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanotm View Post

change LLC to auto or extreme

change core control to manual and set all to enabled

change nb link speed up to 2400

get rid of the negative voltage for cpu and cpu/nb (i have mine set to 1.380 which is basically stock volts)

set cool and quiet to disabled

if its stable with all of those settings then you can increase the core multipler from 20 to 21 for a 200MHz overclock (basically running all cores at the standard 4.2GHz boost speed) and that should be easy to cool with even the stock cooler, of course if you go aio then you can probably pump that up to about 4.5GHz with volts at 1.425

of ocurse if your mobo is weak then you will struggle and possibly kill it and the cpu if try to push the overclock /

Be very careful messing with LLC if you are running a near max OC and are not familiar with exactly what you get by upping it. It can cause extream stress on the parts that may be near their limits as is.

A better practice would be to back it off to something lower like 3.6ghz locked clock and do some stress test trials with a lower voltage and different LLC settings to see exactly how it affects your idle and full load voltage. Pay special attention to the minimum dips you get over a 10+ min test as those are the points of failure and instability in many cases. Find the LLC that eliminates the most Vdroop without over volting beyond what you set it to.

Thank you for the pics. I have some recomendations on changes you might try as well, but not until i get home where i can see them better than on my phone.

I will also add a pic of the screen from my own Asrock bios i was refering to. Yours may not have similar throttle controls page as not all BIOS do, but if it does you did not show a picture of it above and it still may be part of your problem.
Edited by gapottberg - 11/10/17 at 4:43pm
post #67613 of 67694
I think it's the CPU. My old 8320 also did that crap. Needed 1.56V to get 4.5GHz semi-stable.
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Stryker
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post #67614 of 67694
So from a better look at your BIOS I have one suggestion you should try. I would start by backing off your OC to something like stock voltage and 3.7-3.8ghz for preliminary testing.

One thing I notice that has been a common cause of instability for some people is that your HT clock speed is significantly higher than the CPU/NB clock speed. This was a common setting on the earliest bulldozer chips and was later revised as a poor practice on later models due to frequently (but not always) being a source of instability.

Before doing any testing Download HWINFO64 as it is the best for monitoring FX voltage and temps in my experince. You will also want to temporarily disable Cool and Quiet mode. Both that and C1E can be renabled for powersaving once you have a stable OC if you care to.

I would start by lowering your HT clock to 2200mhz to match your CPU/NB...you should be able to easily get this setting stable with say a 3.8ghz OC and your Ram at defualt timings and 1600mhz speed. This will not be a final set up but a good place to start. Starting at stock voltage run a 10-15min stress test on the CPU. Use HWINFO64 to monitor the minimum voltage you see as well as the average and max during the test. Then try using one of the other LLC settings and repeat until you have gone through all the possible LLC options.

Find the LLC option with the lowest Voltage droop during load, keep a perticular eye on max voltage when you go from idle to full load and back again as LLC can sometimes overvolt and that is why testing it on an already OCed system can be disaster if you are close to your limits.

Once you have your LLC figured out up the clocks to 4.0ghz and do your testing again monitoring voltages and temps. If you see dips and failures up the voltage one click at a time until you find a stable setup.

Repeat for 4.2ghz, and again for 4.4ghz, and maybe one more time for 4.6ghz. Make sure with each step you are recording your results somehwhere as well as all your settings.

If you manage to get a better OC with the HT and CPU/NB clocked the same speed, and want to squeeze a little more out of your system; start with uping the CPU/NB to 2400mhz and retest, you may need to add voltage to it using the NB offset. Do not mess with the other voltages for now but if it doesnt work up the offset a few clicks and try again. Mine runs at 2600mhz and needs 1.40v to do so. I can run 2400 at 1.20v so a small bump in speed can require a lot of volts on some boards.

FYI the CPU/NB is on the CPU die and has its own voltage control. Increasing its speed or volts will increase your CPU temps. It will also improve your memory controller and L3 cache speeds which are sometimes a bottleneck on FX chips.

The regular NB is refrencesing the NB chipset which is usually under a heatsink on your motherboard. You do not generally add voltage to this as it can overheat quickly and rarely improves stability. The naming can be confusing however so it is worth pointing out.

If you get 2400mhz CPU/NB stable up your HT to match and repeat. I would go as far as 2600 on both if you can manage it, but you should not need more than stock voltage on the HT and the HT should always be equal or lower than the CPU/NB speed for best stability.



Good luck. If you wanna chat about any of your settings or my methodology hit me up with a PM and I will get you in discord sometime. thumb.gif
Edited by gapottberg - 11/10/17 at 5:37pm
post #67615 of 67694
This is the BIOS setting i am refering to. It needs to be disabled if it is an option.

post #67616 of 67694
Quote:
Originally Posted by bebius View Post

Hallo guys. After some years of using and testing my 8320, I can only reach 4100mhz. I 've done it by undervolting cpu to 1.320V and puting a fan on the vrms of my crappy gigabyte 990fx. This motherboard throttles my cpu hard when temps reach ~60C. I couldn't replace my board and now I'm going for a new gpu cause my 7870xt died. Should I plan to replace my board so as to squeeze more out of my cpu and give it a future? Is it worth it? Or maybe get a liquid cooler?

i am pretty sure it is your vrms that are causing the throttling not the cpu, it shouldn't throttle at 60C. do you have a fan over them?

edit: after catching up it seems many others said this before me. should have continued to read the posts. but yea i 100% agree being a gigabyte board user myself on 2 different builds.

i modded the heat sinks of mine by adding small copper heat sinks to the vrm components not covered by the vrm heatsink and screwing the vrm heatsink of another board directly on top of my current board's with thermal paste between, and a 120mm 2200rpm fan blowing down onto them.

i never run into throttling on my gigabyte 990fx board now
Edited by jaredismee - 11/10/17 at 5:47pm
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post #67617 of 67694
Quote:
Originally Posted by bebius View Post

Hallo guys. After some years of using and testing my 8320, I can only reach 4100mhz. I 've done it by undervolting cpu to 1.320V and puting a fan on the vrms of my crappy gigabyte 990fx. This motherboard throttles my cpu hard when temps reach ~60C. I couldn't replace my board and now I'm going for a new gpu cause my 7870xt died. Should I plan to replace my board so as to squeeze more out of my cpu and give it a future? Is it worth it? Or maybe get a liquid cooler?

Are you using HPC ? Can help with the throttle problem.... Also which giga you have?

Mine UD5 is very nice ... Got my FX-8350 to 4.9 w/ 1.51v and LLC high.

I do have active cooling in the vrm/n.b....

The FX8350/70 do clock better... And the FX-9590 even better !

👍
Edited by jclafi - 11/10/17 at 6:01pm
post #67618 of 67694
@nanotm It stats throttling fast at higher voltages and with the settings I posted .

@gapottberg Thank you for your time. So you are suggesting lowering HT to match CPU/NB and trying to overclock from the beginning. Could this lower my temps and help avoid throttling? What's the effect on the overall performance? I am gonna try your method and tell you. I got little hopes though as it would throttle at stock settings too as I said.
There is no "thermal throttle" setting in my bios.

@jaredismee I have replaced the plastic clips of the vrm heatsink with screws to tighten it up and the thermal pad with my paste. Also added the fan of the stock cpu cooled upon that heatsink. That's how I stopped throttling but up to the voltage I presented.

@jclafi It's 990fxa ud3 rev3.0, known for throttling/vrm issues. It was praised though when I bought it. HPC is on. Nice clocks you have with that ud5.
post #67619 of 67694
Quote:
Originally Posted by bebius View Post

@nanotm It stats throttling fast at higher voltages and with the settings I posted .

@gapottberg Thank you for your time. So you are suggesting lowering HT to match CPU/NB and trying to overclock from the beginning. Could this lower my temps and help avoid throttling? What's the effect on the overall performance? I am gonna try your method and tell you. I got little hopes though as it would throttle at stock settings too as I said.
There is no "thermal throttle" setting in my bios.

@jaredismee I have replaced the plastic clips of the vrm heatsink with screws to tighten it up and the thermal pad with my paste. Also added the fan of the stock cpu cooled upon that heatsink. That's how I stopped throttling but up to the voltage I presented.

@jclafi It's 990fxa ud3 rev3.0, known for throttling/vrm issues. It was praised though when I bought it. HPC is on. Nice clocks you have with that ud5.

You are welcome. Matching the speeds of the CPU/NB and HT are unlikely to solve your throttling issues, but are considered best practice on FX and have been shown to provide more reliable stability when overclocking.

As for advantages...there is another thread investigating significant gains in some gaming scenarios, peeticularly in minimum frame rates when pushing CPU/NB speeds to 2600mhz and better.

It is believed that same games are bottlenecking the L3cache due to its poor latency by desgin...and that the improved clockspeed helps eliminate some of the hang ups often observed in games as frame hitches and stuttering.

It is not conclusive yet as to if this is true but it seems to help some people in some scenarios and is worth trying.

Finally...lower clockspeeds and voltages will always have some impact on temps. The only way to know how much and if it is enough to matter is to try it. If you havnt already another nifty cooling trick is to add a small thin fan (many times stock cooler fans work) behind your socket. The VRMs not only heat up the heatsink but also the air traped behind the motherboard between the socket and back panel. Moveing that air witj a fan can lower temps by over 10'C in the worst case scenrios. To test this simply stress test the rig till it begins to throttle remove the back panel and place a fan blowing on the socket and watch your temps. If they fall dramaticly your case may be the culprit and a case mod adding fesh air fan to the socket may be in order.
post #67620 of 67694
I have seen this method of adding a fan at the mobo's back to cool vrms further. The problem is that my case is a bit inconvient for a fan to be installed there and I cannot keep it open because my pc sits in my living room. However I'm gonna give it a go too in order to clear things up a bit.
What mobo would you suggest? Diggiddi suggested 970 aura. I would like to find a used one so as to cut the cost.
Would it then be ethical to sell my current one knowing of the issues?
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