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Optimal Mouse Configuration - Page 3

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylit View Post

I would have recommended leaving in game sensitivity at default and adjusting DPI accordingly to what you felt comfortable with, though recent game devs have proven that this is potentially bad advice. (I don't agree with them)

Could you please elaborate a little more? rolleyes.gif
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylit View Post

Subjective subjective subjective topic.
In terms of DA, it will perform well at most settings. Might want to lower polling rate to 125hz if you find a need for 3500 DPI.

Subjective, subjective topic indeed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZareliMan View Post

For first person games the best is to use the highest sensitivity available on your mouse and to lower the in-game sensitivity.
Why ?
You'll get a smoother movement, more inbetween steps.

Wrong.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZareliMan View Post

Its a high sensitivity but once you get used to it you get the advantages right away, mainly you wont need lots of space, wont need high max perfect speed, wont be wearing the skates that much, wont need to move your arm at all, can do lightning fast 180 turns, hit the edge of the screen with a single swing, etc.

They're not advantages, they're preferences wink.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashFir View Post

Could you please elaborate a little more? rolleyes.gif

You might want to look here :

http://www.overclock.net/t/173255/cs-s-mouse-optimization-guide
http://www.overclock.net/t/1251156/an-overview-of-mouse-technology

Truth is, this topic has been beaten to death already. You might want to go search on the forums for similar topics, you can find some gems.
Edited by DeMS - 10/26/12 at 3:31pm
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeMS View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylit View Post

Subjective subjective subjective topic.
In terms of DA, it will perform well at most settings. Might want to lower polling rate to 125hz if you find a need for 3500 DPI.

Subjective, subjective topic indeed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZareliMan View Post

For first person games the best is to use the highest sensitivity available on your mouse and to lower the in-game sensitivity.
Why ?
You'll get a smoother movement, more inbetween steps.

Wrong.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZareliMan View Post

Its a high sensitivity but once you get used to it you get the advantages right away, mainly you wont need lots of space, wont need high max perfect speed, wont be wearing the skates that much, wont need to move your arm at all, can do lightning fast 180 turns, hit the edge of the screen with a single swing, etc.

They're not advantages, they're preferences wink.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashFir View Post

Could you please elaborate a little more? rolleyes.gif

You might want to look here :

http://www.overclock.net/t/173255/cs-s-mouse-optimization-guide
http://www.overclock.net/t/1251156/an-overview-of-mouse-technology

Truth is, this topic has been beaten to death already. You might want to go search on the forums for similar topics, you can find some gems.

Sorry I'm new so I realize I'm contributing to the topic being beaten to death. I'm reading through it right now and I ran into this
Quote:
1.5 - DPI related to in-game sensitivity

If your mouse does NOT have adjustable dpi then you can skip this chapter if you want to!

People who do not use the driver may have preset options like: 400, 800 or 1600dpi. The important thing is to use the full capability of the mouse when playing CS:S. No matter what sensitivity you play the game at, you really should use your mouse on it's highest dpi setting while in-game. This gives the finest precision and makes movement feel noticeably smoother. The only exception to this rule is players using a very low sensitivity may sometimes be able to reduce negative acceleration at a lower dpi setting.

The opposite side to what you mentioned up there?
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashFir View Post

Sorry I'm new so I realize I'm contributing to the topic being beaten to death. I'm reading through it right now and I ran into this
The opposite side to what you mentioned up there?

Not really.

General advices are wrong in the sense that they assume everyone knows the limits of what is safe practice and what's not, and that people will be able to tell when those advices are going to be detrimental on their experience, which is usually not the case on either.

Putting your DPI up high was a relatively good idea when Antigen posted his guide, as mice didn't get to stratospheric DPI levels (top was 1600-2000), and people used to play on mid sensitivity. However, the higher the DPI - there's a couple of exceptions out there, but they only confirm the rule - the lower the tracking quality and the lower the maximum perfect control speed of most sensors, and on the sensitivity side, most games either won't allow you to input values lower than 1 - or will reset to 1 -, or they will show artifacts - negative acceleration probably - on decimal numbers - watch out, not every game has this behaivor, nor not everyone is able to notice it.

Also, those general advices neglect the input method presented by the game. In Raw input, I can agree that you're free to use whatever DPI step that might suit you - as long as it's good enough sensor-wise -, but neither every game uses Raw input, neither that's true on every other input method. Using windows pointer method, for example, the higher the DPI, the lower the perfect control speed your game will give you, since cursor will reach the edges of the screen earlier than on lower DPI.

Explained on the second link, you might want to check the "Pixel Considerations" part of the text. You might want to read up all of v.

In short, there's a minimal CPI at which you can avoid pixel skipping, but you won't get any higher precision from configuring your mouse with higher CPI, only faster speed.
On the other side, you might benefit from lower sensitivity values, as you will have more "granularity" in-game, but it's all confined within certain limits.
post #25 of 29
400 if you use your whole arm to aim and turn, 800 for your wrist and lift to turn.... 1200-1800 if you only use your wrist in a very small area. in games like CS i can see why 400 dpi being better and call of duty around 800-1800. youre either gonna be good at long distance or close quarter. i dont really believe in the set sensitivity to 1. its better to find a DPI middleground and adjust sensitivity from 1-3. i personally prefer 400ish for CS and no more than 800 for call of duty.
post #26 of 29
I don't use more than 900 CPI for Counter Strike with a sensitivity under 1.37. I don't see a reason to use more than that unless it is a Zowie and you use 1150 CPI.

For desktop use above 900 is nice because it is just easier to do things. As I said, 1150 or less for shooters.
post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Well right now I'm using my Mamba/DeathAdder at 1800 DPI with my in game sensitivity set to 2.2 for CoD games.

I feel like I'm not able to be precise at all unless my arm is straight out so I only move my wrist.
post #28 of 29
Many of the best FPS-Pro-Gamers in the world (e.g. n0thing, f0rest etc.) only play with 400 or not more than 800 dpi - and they should know it best wink.gif
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Phantom No. 1
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-2600k Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H Geforce GTX 570 Phantom G.Skill RipJaws 
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Seagate Crucial M4 Crucial M500 Alpenföhn "Brocken" 
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post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeMS View Post

Not really.
General advices are wrong in the sense that they assume everyone knows the limits of what is safe practice and what's not, and that people will be able to tell when those advices are going to be detrimental on their experience, which is usually not the case on either.
Putting your DPI up high was a relatively good idea when Antigen posted his guide, as mice didn't get to stratospheric DPI levels (top was 1600-2000), and people used to play on mid sensitivity. However, the higher the DPI - there's a couple of exceptions out there, but they only confirm the rule - the lower the tracking quality and the lower the maximum perfect control speed of most sensors, and on the sensitivity side, most games either won't allow you to input values lower than 1 - or will reset to 1 -, or they will show artifacts - negative acceleration probably - on decimal numbers - watch out, not every game has this behaivor, nor not everyone is able to notice it.
Also, those general advices neglect the input method presented by the game. In Raw input, I can agree that you're free to use whatever DPI step that might suit you - as long as it's good enough sensor-wise -, but neither every game uses Raw input, neither that's true on every other input method. Using windows pointer method, for example, the higher the DPI, the lower the perfect control speed your game will give you, since cursor will reach the edges of the screen earlier than on lower DPI.
Explained on the second link, you might want to check the "Pixel Considerations" part of the text. You might want to read up all of v.
In short, there's a minimal CPI at which you can avoid pixel skipping, but you won't get any higher precision from configuring your mouse with higher CPI, only faster speed.
On the other side, you might benefit from lower sensitivity values, as you will have more "granularity" in-game, but it's all confined within certain limits.

It's more of a minimal yaw/pitch rotation and FOV value in 3D games. DPI only serves as sensitivity.

Depending on the quality of the hardware/firmware etc, a mouse is precise in its own right, not subject to "DPI".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightlight9000 View Post

Many of the best FPS-Pro-Gamers in the world (e.g. n0thing, f0rest etc.) only play with 400 or not more than 800 dpi - and they should know it best wink.gif

Subjectivity. There is really "no best" setting, but rather optimal configuration. Pro or not, it wont matter.
Edited by Skylit - 11/2/12 at 5:44am
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