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Razer Synapse 2.0 software/mouse unusable if you dont have an internet connection or their servers are down... - Page 15  

post #141 of 190
im still running an older driver on my lachesis(2) and not an issue ever having to deal with synapse. hahaha screw you razer. if synapse ever hits my system ill be the first to chuck the mice out the window and go buy something else.
 
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post #142 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogdud View Post

I really can't think of a single piece of hardware (mouse, keyboard, motherboard, hard drive, cpu, video card, monitor, speakers, etc. etc.) that I own where I've had to do this. It is unique to Razer as far as I can see.

Some have the option to register your product when you install the drivers, but they are just links to their website and are completely optional (logitech for example). You can cancel out of it and go your merry way using your product and all of it's features, even if you never register it.

Not entirely true. If you're playing in windows and mac worlds...Your motherboard out of the box has SLIC technology (unless you've hacked it somehow, or live in a country that doesn't allow it, etc.) in it that binds to your OS and locks you in a contract. Unless you're going out of your way to be stealthy, running only linux, bsd, or something along those lines with a commercial free installation...cracking stuff or using aliases to register it...AND running around using covert or public wi-fi networks exclusively...it's all tied to you anyway. Almost all of the hardware mentioned, the first thing 90% of the people out there do is log in to the homesite to plug in their warranty info and see if there are firmware and driver updates before they go to the trouble to try to use it. Windows itself, every version since XP grabs service packs and updates regularly in its default state...and you only get a limited time to register it before it locks you out and begs for a key of some sort. More and more devices don't even come with an install disk anymore...it's lets them chip a few cents off the price and avoid laying off another ten employees this month. Quite alot offer a choice between an OEM type version that comes with no disks or docs at all, or you can opt for the full retail that has all that with more lenient licensing at a higher price. I haven't had a printer in over 10 years that didn't install pretty in depth, all but mandatory proprietary drivers with online updater's and spoolers constantly running in the background if you you want to unlock the bulk of their features....2/3rds of them these days don't even try to print till they go grab a live network printer plugin of some sort with every job.

Why would you not immediately register any piece of tech from the get-go anyway? ESPECIALLY one so dependent on software. What can these companies do to harm you based on the minimal information it takes to register a product? Seriously...be far more afraid of your government and the mega corps that pipe water and electricity into your home each day. Now they can hurt you if they really feel like it. Those guys are even afforded the power to garnish your pay check before it's even printed! Go cry about them........

1. The drivers/firmware and disks that come with things have usually been updated/improved and you'll want to check all that anyway. Yes, the majority of places out there that sell things and provide drivers want in the least an email address before they let you download. I've not yet acquired a single piece of smart/configurable hardware (motherboards, dvd drives, smart mice/keyboards, printers, etc.) that did not have driver, firmware, or UI updates that fixed 'major' issues' from its out of the box state. Even my cheap brandless mp3 player got more value and features (ogg support and a few other pretty significant improvements) when it let it go online for 2 minutes!

2. It locks in your warranty information and speeds up any potential RMA issues that may unfold if you ever need to use it. It's pretty easy to misplace receipts and stuff...and registering properly often makes receipt loss a non-issue. ALWAYS register your stuff.

3. If there are any product recalls, class action suits, or any other notifications or entitlements on your behalf they can promptly notify you and you will not miss out. Over my lifetime I've gotten quite a few nifty new products in the mail because I bothered to register them (something was recalled or otherwise corrected by the company). Unless I were to spend hours a day browsing recall ledgers for all the stuff I buy, I'd probably have missed out on most of them.

4. Why is it that folks have no problems with a generic driver auto downloading from a Microsoft server? (and if you think it doesn't know who you are just because you don't 'log in' you are highly mistaken...Unless of course you are using pirated/cracked software or registered with fake information and are stealing bandwidth from a different wi-fi every 3 minutes), or in using the worlds worst 'snooping services' thousands of times a day (everything from google to facebook)

5. Many registration processes offer tons of 'optional' perks. News letters. Instructional courses. Invites to tech shows. Samples of products to evaluate. Discounts for future orders...etc.

It seems to be okay for mega corps that make 50,000 products, and also own utilties, control the airwaves, media centers, and push around entire populations do this stuff by the second...but if a tiny little gadget company that focuses on a very tiny super specialized market wants to get just enough info to have some impact on gaming markets...they're EVIL snoopers?

They also refuse to acknowledge that the 'other' mega companies that might not collect information from you for your mouse or keyboard don't need to, because they've already sold you a TV, a dish or cable network plan, broad band service with a dozen email accounts, a computer, a monitor, a cell phone, washer and dryer, half the bits and pieces installed in your car, and probably even your life insurance policy...and they already know more about you than you do! Here you have one small company that's only been around a short while that only wants you to set up a simple account on a tiny network that's only dealing with gaming profiles and keyboard layouts is supposed to be phishing for illegit data to 'sell'?

I bet some of the people complaining the loudest about 'Razer snooping' play MMORPGs that put about 50 torrets swapping out info (you're paying them $40 a month to distribute software and stuff for them) that has nothing to do with 'your game' on your system, and snoop everything you do, PLUS they'll install something like a free version of Curse that spams ads and records everything you do, while they hit 30 game cheat sites in a day that are infamous for spreading key loggers so they can hack your toons and sell off your little characters loot. Then when it all crashes....who will they blame? The smallest, most specialized, and least equipped/poised to 'cheat/steal' company in the field. Giving Razer, logitech, or anyone else your email address is nothing compared to the truly intimate personal data and interactions these games are often mining about you, your attitudes, character, personality, etc.

If you really are using all pirated stuff...or otherwise have a need for being stealthy on the net (if you need a 'secure' pc...don't install ANYTHING non enterprise and not designed for high security on the system...especially a 'game')...if you wanted, you could do the same cheat with your mouse as with Windows, and register it to an alias or something, but like with Windows, you'd possibly be forgoing a bunch of rights and privileges on parts of the contract that are actually in YOUR favor by using false information to register. Contracts do work two ways....there are benefits there for YOU as well as for them.

I do not understand the major issue with a one time login to start using all the advanced features of the mouse. I really don't see this company as being poised or equipped to be major data miners/sellers, so a few in this thread have really gone off the charts with baseless accusations about Razer wanting to 'snoop' people for purposes beyond enhancing their gaming experience, and of course appeal to your forking over a bit from your wallet for their goods and services. As for sharing gaming info and experiences...it's what they do for a living! Of course they're going to learn from it all, but more importantly, their users get to learn and share form each other...and from the company as well. It's not a 'one way deal' that only benefits Razer. Of course they want to know, and I'm sure you can opt out of 'sharing' any of 'your knowledge/secrets' about how you use and set up your mouse.

I agree that there should be controls to block it from going online and storing stuff on the cloud if you wish (good PR move), and that it definitely needs to be able to work easily and efficiently when folks aren't connected. I agree that it's nice to be able to flag things not to run at boot unless you really need them...and those options will indeed come in more obvious forms if they aren't already there (Open your services manager and disable the stuff you're not using if it's really that much in the way). At the same time you have to realize that the gaming desktop may not be an eternal standard out there...people are moving to smaller cloud based technologies and Razer has to have some long range ideas/plans, and try to get a foot and keep it in those emerging technologies (which will also impact how games are designed, sold, shared, etc.). Remember...this is a small company that makes a hand full of products, as compared to the others that do hundreds, or even thousands of them! They can't stay afloat forever just making hardware in an ever shrinking yet growingly increasingly competitive desktop gaming market.

The company has bent over backwards to correct some pretty obvious mistakes on their part, yet folks keep ignoring everything they say and keep posting this same stuff over and over simply to slander one of the most reputable names in the entire gaming industry...with by far one of the cleanest international records in existence when it comes to being sued or otherwise accused of intent to harm or take advantage it's consumer base.

1. They explained the goals and benefits of the new software architecture. I saw FAR more planned for the consumer in this than being 'snooped'. From what I read earlier in this post, it is a pretty significant LEAP that will certainly be of value to many consumers (kinda like going from a 32 bit OS to a 64bit one in that you can see and use more memory at a time and do more with it...that it allows more easily porting various things from device to device and place to place) 1. unlimited profile memory. 2. portable profiles across multiple devices. 3. A FAR more flexible development platform that will let them roll out more powerful and flexible features to their ENTIRE range of products more quickly, and cost effectively. 4. Ability to share profiles with friends (for a GM that's a BIG help literally worth hours of time a day!). 2.0 really does seem to offer alot of amazing possibilities that nothing else on the market offers just yet.

2. Legacy drivers ARE available where possible. As for them trying to strap an anchor on future product lines to make them all 1.0 backwards compatible...it just doesn't make sense for mice and keyboards....while these things aren't 'cheap' from a consumer perspective, they're not exactly pricey super computers being implemented in massive enterprise situations that need long term support/service either. None they less, they have promised to try to keep older products up to date and make 2.0 run on them as an option.

3. They admitted to a mistake in their software agreement contracts and promptly changed that at the request of their user base while pretty much apologizing on bended knee to anyone that cared for the blunder. The wording was pretty bad in that contract, but now it's fixed.

4. They immediately began tweaking 2.0 even more to suit the needs, tastes, and demands of their users.

Razer does take some pretty big risks with products and ideas at times, but in today's markets with dozens of great options out there getting ever cheaper and cheaper...competition is fierce and that's what it takes to try to stay in the game. They win some, they loose some...but if they don't try these ideas and put stuff on store shelves for people to try out in the wild...the competition sure as heck will chip away at what small profit margins there are in the markets to be had in those 'status quo' product lines that play it safe and don't try new ideas. After all, Razer did ask gamers of all sorts out there what they wanted or thought would be cool, and are trying to provide it at a reasonable price point. It's pretty obvious that they've tried to find things gamers ask for that you can't already find in a dozen other products out there and see if they can successfully make it and sell it.

It doesn't always work so well early on...but you can bet your bottom dollar that all the competition is sitting back waiting to copy the stuff Razer takes risks and flack for researching and trying in the marketplace (while they continue to remind people and compare their brand new 'copied' stuff with the issues Razer had and fixed 5 product generations ago).

Now I do understand that a part that doesn't work for you or do what you need is simply not acceptable.

I do believe (if I read correctly) that they offered to refund your money. If you're not happy with the device and don't like they way they currently have to support it, there's not much else they can do for you at that moment. It's obvious to me that this company does listen to people, and tries to give them what they want as soon as possible.

I've seen them try to explain that here in this post at least twice, and more in other places concerning the 2.0 software. Bad reviews are fine as well, but simply ranting a bunch of nonsense over and over about company ethics...that no other company in the world has servers that you need to log into to get maximum functionality out of their product(s) is pretty close to asinine.

The razer way of doing software isn't going to be for everyone, but it is unique, and if it works as they're planning for it to work...it's going to have a BIG impact on gaming interfaces, and it will indeed be for the better.

I've owned 3 Razer products and used the hell out of them since 2009. They haven't been 'perfect' as there were some issues with my very first Naga (motherboard firmware...so not totally Razer's fault...the thing worked in fine in 4 out of 5 computers here that I plugged it into). Otherwise the Naga has been amazingly responsive, tough, and with a wipe and cleaning it still looks like new. Parts do eventually wear out, my 3 year old Lycosa keytops (possibly the worst product Razer has ever made...and it's been a fine performing keyboard for my uses, and has held up as well as anything else 'backlit' that I've ever had from that price-range) looks like hell (the sweat in my hands eats up everything it touches, not just Razer keyboards) and I've replaced a few keytops before, but every one still works as good as new...so I have darn well gotten more than my money's worth out of them.

I keep looking at new keyboards....but this one just won't die! Maybe I'll grab something with Cherries in it here pretty soon.....maybe a Blackwidow stealth, or maybe something else. For me, the cloud will be an advantage even tho' there are better raw cherry keyboards out there for less cash. Why a Razer among all those mech choices, some with superior NKRO and aesthetics/looks? If you're into more social games with lots of people, and you need to gear up an entire guild or just enjoy playing with 'the newbies' and helping them get going....well....using the 'cloud' stuff to communicate about or exchange profiles and data sets is a really nice 'feature' and right now, no one else has it yet!
Edited by Credo1970 - 2/25/13 at 7:08am
post #143 of 190
To be honest Synapse 2.0 seemed to be well behaved and pretty light when I installed it to change the settings on my Deathadder 2013. It's as unobtrusive as Logitech's LGS but I don't need Razer software to run in the background to keep my mouse settings unlike the G400. Of course I don't like signing up* just to use a driver and I dislike any cloud based services but once I dialed in my settings Synapse was taken right off.

*Already had a login as my Blackwidow needed Synapse to use the macro settings.
post #144 of 190
[delete me]
Sorry, still learning how to get my posts in the right place here.
Edited by Credo1970 - 2/25/13 at 3:14am
post #145 of 190
[delete me]
oops, posted to the wrong place again, edited to move...sorry...new to the forum.
Edited by Credo1970 - 2/25/13 at 3:14am
post #146 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omega215d View Post

To be honest Synapse 2.0 seemed to be well behaved and pretty light when I installed it to change the settings on my Deathadder 2013. It's as unobtrusive as Logitech's LGS but I don't need Razer software to run in the background to keep my mouse settings unlike the G400. Of course I don't like signing up* just to use a driver and I dislike any cloud based services but once I dialed in my settings Synapse was taken right off.

*Already had a login as my Blackwidow needed Synapse to use the macro settings.

Yep...reasonable indeed.

It's not so much the 'driver' part you're messing with in Synapse. That's the software that lets you customize the thing...leds, macros, sensitivity, lighting, etc.
Most all mice/keyboards with bindable keys, media functions, lighting options, are going to have this kind of software (the exception being some of the high end mechanical boards that have all that stuff as key combos or buttons in firmware...but it's pretty much something you can't change or mess with as a user on those...you punch some buttons and it does it).

If you really want, for many models, and you only use the mouse with one setting...you can probably set it up then uninstall the extra software.

If you don't want to uninstall it but just don't use it that often...go into your windows services and disable the parts you don't need till you need them again...as you would any other software that installs services to run at boot. The 'drivers' themselves should still work just fine and for models with onboard memory your settings should be remembered.
Edited by Credo1970 - 2/25/13 at 5:25am
post #147 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eduardv View Post

Guys Synapse 2.0 is total crap,check this out:

I have a Dathadder 3.5G and a Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000.

It doesn't matter if you have a razer keyboard or not,Synapse will force the keyboard drivers on your system even if you dont have a Razer keyboard!

Anyway to fix this?


A multi-button mouse, especially if has more than 3 standard buttons, is often half keyboard (maybe even using a chipset from a keyboard). I.E. half mouse, half keyboard...hence two drivers (or one combined one that might be named keyboard, or mouse in all your windows sys config stuff).

Case in point...
If I take a razer naga and plug it into a brand new windows machine, and do not install any razer drivers at all...period, windows will go find a generic usb driver, and a generic keyboard driver (the naga has a ton of buttons/keys on it...pretty much a full numberpad). Depending on how I have a little switch on the bottom of the Naga, it'll either bind all those 'extra buttons' to function keys, or to the number keypad. Normal mouse buttons and wheels are usually treated as part of a mouse, but it's possible they might do it on a keyboard driver for whatever reasons (or even give you a choice via switches, firmware, or other software tweaks).

So depending on what type of mouse you have this is terribly normal. You might also see them merge it all into one 'keyboard' driver at some point (at least in name on the windows hardware reports). Under the hood, it's all going to be nearly the same and in higher level languages/formats where they store the information holding your profiles...probably in a simple format like xml, html, or something along those lines. They can tack pretty much any UI on top of that software engine they want for various products. Does this make sense? One super engine...many products...just some profile definitions and then add a skin that goes with the device.

One of the central points of Synapse 2.0 is that all of the profiles from all of the various devices they make are somewhat portable and will be even moreso in the future. I.E. you could pull key bindings or macro sets from your razer keyboard and put them on your razer mouse keys easily, or vice verse, and so forth. It goes even further than this...you could even swap macros, layouts, and bindings with other users of different model razer stuff. With that in mind, it starts to make sense that you might see drivers that you don't think are necessary showing up in the system config stuff. It might even say keyboard deep under the windows hood, but actually be controlling a mouse.

I.E. you play a mmorpg and are in charge of the healers in a raid. Today you have 25 players from various classes to manage on the healing duties of a 200 man raid. You've been given a strategy by the GM that will work better if your healing team has some macros and key bindings handy. In fact, some of your healers need a slightly different setup than the rest...so you sure don't want to have to spend all day teaching them what macros to bind. With software like this, you could store and share your profiles, and anyone with a razer mouse or keyboard could grab them prebuild off your profile and stick them on whatever razer gadget or key they want (doesn't have to be the same model or even device as yours...one might want it on the keyboard, another on the mouse...etc.). As the platform advances they'll probably also implement some quick view features so that those with non razer stuff could at least pull it up and see what the macro or binding does so they can build their own...it's possible that someday that it won't matter what brand devices you have...you could jump on the cloud and swap macros and layouts across brands and models! At the end of the day...with the Synapse concept you're one more step closer to making a task that can sometimes take hours of raid 'setup' time to communicate and implement...into a 3 minute 'grab it and go' scenario.

This sort of thing will be a dream come true when it fully matures for people who play mmorpg, or any kind of team PVP stuff where strategies, macros, and keybindings need to be quickly exchanged between team mates. A few games out there are even 'trying' to build these abilities into the games themselves at a great deal of developer time and money. If a standard comes along that does all this for them...it lets players choose what they prefer, and the game dev team can spend more time and money on content and less on UI headaches. Meanwhile, guild leaders currently have to spend a great deal of time hashing this stuff out beforehand, and attempting to host it on their own websites for their guilds. If their act isn't together...players get frustrated and leave! Some of these raids can involve a couple of hundred people...so the easier they can make it to do setups and strat preps...the more people will stick around and play....and have a good time (waiting for instructions and figuring them out can be a real drag...more time playing...less time setting up junk is always a welcome thing ).

Long range, this might even be applicable across different brands of mice and keyboards as well...who knows. It's a great idea for many many types of games.

With that in mind, a multi-button mouse is basically a mouse driver and a keyboard driver combined.

So, one or two low level drivers that have mastered their chosen chipsets in theory could run the whole range of devices simply by taking on pretty easy to develop (for them and for us users) high level user interfaces.

So it would make sense if you are seeing a keyboard driver of some sort.
Edited by Credo1970 - 2/25/13 at 5:15am
post #148 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by MONVMENTVM View Post

Unfortunately this wouldn't be an easy task to accomplish in a way that we would reach any significant numbers. The majority of their customers probably have no idea of what the deal with synapse 2.0 is and probably some don't even care.

The majority of their users probably know what it's like to sit around in a 200 man raid all night waiting for the GMs to explain what keybindings and macros are needed for the strat and have been asking for features like this for years. Perhaps it's not features that are an issue for your type of gameplay, but when they get this just right, it's going to be a major improvement for many gamers. It's also a very viable market for them to chase and appease...a very significant portion of their customer base pays from $20 to hundred, or even thousands of bucks a month to play multi-player games that demand large teams, and a great deal of organized social networking. The games themselves are entrenched in cloud technology, and have foreseeable possiblities of being implemented in all sorts of devices beyond the 'high end desktop'. So it's more than just mice and keyboards....it's 'people', 'ideas', 'competing standards', and the potential for future interfaces that make keyboards and mice look like things from the stone age.

Cutting edge games are starting to have OPEN environments, where the boundaries are endless and thousands of people can play together towards like or opposing objectives. Users can even invent environments, communities, economies, currencies viable in real world applications, and gaming objectives of their own. I.E. set up your own server and plug into the grid...or rent a sim from somewhere else on the cloud and plug it into larger metaverses. In the not so distant future actual individual gamers will not only be able to set up entire sims of their own imagination...but also develop their own user interfaces (touch, voice, breath, kinetic, bio-rhythm, etc.) to go with it all (without having to have a PHD in low level binary programming).

Companies that don't keep their eye on this will be left in the dust. In ten years...we might not even be using 'mice and keyboards' anymore...so it's more to it than just having the best quality piece of hardware for the best price (while that stuff is indeed very important). When a company has limited resources to work with, deadlines, supply chains, contracts, and bills to pay...they have to take some risks and try to be first at some things that no one else is doing just yet. Call it gimmicks if you like, but it's actually long range survival.

I do hate that it comes across as being kind of 'in the way' for some people who just want a really nice mouse to blow away stuff in a first person shooter that they mostly play alone, or occasionally in a one on one or free for all pvp setting, but other than logging in the very first time you use it, it's really not that much different from any other device config UI. Set it and forget it. Even remove it or disable it after the setup if it's that much IN THE WAY.

Alot of us lesser intelligent folks spent money on a programmable interface because we need to change it often, and use the 'bloated' stuff frequently.

The 'majority of us 'stuipd' Razer users' are either trying to 'organize' good gaming experiences for hundreds of people at a time...or have more time than once been extremely frustrated at the long sessions of (dis)organization and setup that can often accompany opening stages of a raid or team PVP session. This can mean more time playing...and less time standing around and punching in friggin macros (or trying to explain to people what they need and how to get it punched into whatever the heck they're using). Now we have portable macros for any razor device that are easy to share at no additional cost to gamers or game developers.

Also, the majority of us gaming idiots out here can see the vision here, as well as significant progress given this company's resources. It's not a gimmik, it's something people have been wanting and requesting for years! Hopefully someday it'll be universal in nature, and work across all brands. Being able to pull parts, or all, of any razer profile and stick it anywhere you want on any other razor device is a pretty darn good start.

We also have no name walmart specials, logitecs, and microsofts, decks, duckys, and every other piece of gear you can imagine...they all have their good and bad points. I don't use Razer for everything and I'm by no means some kind of loyal fanboy of theirs...but they do have a legit vision here with their software, and they're implementing as competent of plan as their small company can afford to reach all their goals. They don't make junk (never have and never will), and they do listen to gamers pretty intently and have without doubt contributed a lot of great stuff to the gaming interface industry. Some of it still has a long way to go, and might not even catch on...but it's more than gimmicks....it's their lifeline.

Just a few more obvious examples of a bold company that's really trying to do more than 'manufacture stuff'. There are dozens of high end gaming laptops out there...all pricey...all with little advantages and disadvantages for their price ranges...but who did the one that has something unique and potentially ground breaking at the time they launched it? Razer....with a touch screen in the place of a touch pad. It might not go anywhere...it might do better if it had the 'right software'...it might become the next standard in gaming laptops if they can get them priced right and in the right stores. Only one way to find out. Now they have a keyboard for desktops that features this touch screen technology as well. Will any games even find a cool (just gotta have it) use for it besides a glorified touch pad? Windows 8 sure is set up with the tools and apps to do something with that screen...and no doubt Razer knew such potential was coming. Will the world even try to do much with it? At least someone built it, and put it on the shelves to try to find out. In the lower priced keyboards they've also got alot of interesting and weird things you just don't see anywhere else that are indeed useful for many games. Gimmiks? I don't think so...Risky? You betcha...but not dumb risk...they played games and counted the heads of the people buying those games, watched people play them....asked people what they wanted and where/how they wanted it...and even tried a few wild ideas of their own. I don't track the sales, but most of them are still being ordered and manufactured, so someone must be buying them. I doubt they're 'stupid'...maybe just rich smile.gif
Edited by Credo1970 - 2/25/13 at 5:56am
post #149 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Credo1970 View Post

Yep...reasonable indeed.

It's not so much the 'driver' part you're messing with in Synapse. That's the software that lets you customize the thing...leds, macros, sensitivity, lighting, etc.
Most all mice/keyboards with bindable keys, media functions, lighting options, are going to have this kind of software (the exception being some of the high end mechanical boards that have all that stuff as key combos or buttons in firmware...but it's pretty much something you can't change or mess with as a user on those...you punch some buttons and it does it).

If you really want, for many models, and you only use the mouse with one setting...you can probably set it up then uninstall the extra software.

If you don't want to uninstall it but just don't use it that often...go into your windows services and disable the parts you don't need till you need them again...as you would any other software that installs services to run at boot. The 'drivers' themselves should still work just fine and for models with onboard memory your settings should be remembered.

I still like to keep Synapse 2.0 installed should I feel like changing some stuff again but right now I leave it off and keep it from starting with Windows. It's not as bad as some make it out to be but then again it was a little annoying when it first came out and signing up shouldn't be needed to use a driver. I really dislike Cloud-based junk and would rather more mice and keyboards ship with some on-board storage for profiles and such. The Deathadder 2013 seems to satisfy that need as does my CM Trigger and Spawn.
post #150 of 190
@ OP, Mouse DRM seriously? How does one pirate hardware? why do we even need mouse drm..
MEGATRON
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 4710MQ P170-SM-A Nvidia GTX 980M @ 1470mhz 32GB DDR3L 1600mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung SSD 840 EVO Msata 250GB SanDisk SDSSDX120GG25 HGST 1TB Blu-Ray 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
OverCharged Cage fans Windows 8.1 + Virtual Machines Modified 1080P glossy IPS 60hz Stock 
Power
240 Watt Brick 
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MEGATRON
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 4710MQ P170-SM-A Nvidia GTX 980M @ 1470mhz 32GB DDR3L 1600mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung SSD 840 EVO Msata 250GB SanDisk SDSSDX120GG25 HGST 1TB Blu-Ray 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
OverCharged Cage fans Windows 8.1 + Virtual Machines Modified 1080P glossy IPS 60hz Stock 
Power
240 Watt Brick 
  hide details  
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  • Razer Synapse 2.0 software/mouse unusable if you dont have an internet connection or their servers are down...
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Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Mice › Razer Synapse 2.0 software/mouse unusable if you dont have an internet connection or their servers are down...