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How to Test CPU for Max Temps

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I have been wanting to check my CPU temps to see whether or not I would need a better heatsink so I was wondering what I should download? I have a 3570k and it is not overclocked at all. Should I get Prime95 and RealTemp?
post #2 of 11
CoreTemp or RealTemp to check the temps, Prime95 or IntelBurnTest (IBT) to stress the CPU.
post #3 of 11
You don't need a better heatsink, if it's not overclocked; any company would provide sufficient cooling at the stock configuration.

If you are getting temperatures that seem like they are higher than they should be, you need to remount your cooler. At stock it should be around 70 degrees Celsius.
post #4 of 11
First and foremost I must admit I'm not very knowledgeable to say the last. However, my common sense tells me that it'd make sense to run multiple softwares to monitor the temperature(s). Not necessarily at the same time. Also, something worth nothing is that, from what I've read on OCN, most softwares will indicate different temperatures. That's why I personally believe it'd be better to check all of the softwares you're able to get your hands on. Better be safe than sorry.

Links to softwares able to monitor temperatures:
  1. HWMonitor
    http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html
  2. RealTemp (As you mentioned yourself)
    http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/
  3. CoreTemp
    http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/

Links to softwares that can stress the CPU
  1. Prime95 (As you mentioned yourself)
    32 bit - http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=103
    64 bit - http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=205
  2. IntelBurn Test
    http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=213
  3. OCCT
    http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=214

Most people seem to recommend 6-12 hours of torturing in Prime95 in order for your CPU to be considered stable on a 24/7 basis. This is obviously not a fool proof way of proving it but it's a good start. It's a good idea to test the CPU using, at separate occasions, multiple softwares. Some softwares may pick up certain errors where others don't.

As Art Vanelay said, if you've not overclocked the CPU the stock cooler should be sufficient. He also mentioned that the mounting of the cooler may be faulty but so may the application of thermal compound.

If you run into any technical issues I suggest you post the temperatures, the cooling equipment you use and your ambient temperature.
Edited by ColtoM - 10/26/12 at 5:57pm
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColtoM View Post

First and foremost I must admit I'm not very knowledgeable to say the last. However, my common sense tells me
Most people seem to recommend 6-12 hours of torturing in Prime95 in order for your CPU to be considered stable on a 24/7 basis. This is obviously not a fool proof way of proving it but it's a good start. It's a good idea to test the CPU using, at separate occasions, multiple softwares. Some softwares may pick up certain errors where others don't.
As Art Vandelay said, if you've not overclocked the CPU the stock cooler should be sufficient. He also mentioned that the mounting of the cooler may be faulty but so may the application of thermal compound.
If you run into any technical issues I suggest you post the temperatures, the cooling equipment you use and your ambient temperature.
You don't really need to run it for hours if it is at stock; your system is very unlikely to be unstable at stock.
post #6 of 11
Download RealTemp or CoreTemp and run Intel Burn Test on maximum.
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Vanelay View Post

You don't really need to run it for hours if it is at stock; your system is very unlikely to be unstable at stock.

Pfft.. you and your reading skills. My mind actually completely ignored the "and it is not overclocked at all" part of the OP. Thanks for the comment - time to edit my post.
post #8 of 11
HWMonitor (for individual core temps), CoreTemp, and RealTemp all read the same information off the CPU (distance to TJMax) - the only reason they would be different would be the polling rate where the temp might change slightly faster than one or the other would pick up, or if one of them had the wrong TJMax set.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post

HWMonitor (for individual core temps), CoreTemp, and RealTemp all read the same information off the CPU....

All temperature monitoring programs read the exact same temperature data from the same register in the CPU. The interesting thing is that when the CPU is fully loaded, HWMonitor is the least accurate at reporting the peak core temperature. Here's an example of a brief test using LinX.

http://img651.imageshack.us/img651/1813/tempcomparisona.png

Peak Core Temperatures

Core 0
CPUID HWMonitor - 74
Open Hardware Monitor - 80
Core Temp - 80
RealTemp - 80

Core 1
CPUID HWMonitor - 82
Open Hardware Monitor - 88
Core Temp - 87
RealTemp - 87

Core 2
CPUID HWMonitor - 80
Open Hardware Monitor - 85
Core Temp - 85
RealTemp - 85

Core 3
CPUID HWMonitor - 78
Open Hardware Monitor - 83
Core Temp - 83
RealTemp - 83

CPU Package
CPUID HWMonitor - 86
Open Hardware Monitor - 88
Core Temp - not reported
RealTemp - 87


On this CPU, Open Hardware Monitor, RealTemp and Core Temp all report the peak core temperatures almost identically. HWMonitor consistently reports the peak core temperature 5C to 6C less than the competition when testing a fully loaded CPU. Try doing your own testing with Prime95, OCCT or LinX to fully load the CPU.
post #10 of 11
Any idea why? Wrong TJMax maybe?
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