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$700 budget Gaming rig - Page 2

post #11 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by lacunacraft View Post

Thanks for the build list Dimaggio. that looks very solid as well. I just wish i had a way of getting an os for cheaper, but if wishes were fishes i would have a whole lot of them.
.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/buy

If you cant afford that step the 650TI down to a HD 7770 and it should then fit in your budget.
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post #12 of 45
Here is a quick throw together. If you don't plan on overclocking there really is no need to invest the money into a high end board and cooling unit. You should be able to drop Steamroller into this board also down the line, I imagine Biostar will continue to support it (maybe). I run it and its pretty solid little board for quite cheap, it also allows for overclocking via the multiplier. But with a 3+1 phase VRM I wouldn't even mess with it. On the other note sacrificing high performance parts in areas you wont notice them at all, gives you a big boost in getting higher end hardware in other areas. The HD 7850 OC will run every game you've listed maxed out without a problem. The FX-6300 also will be a huge bonus when it comes to being a workhorse (6 cores vs 2 cores). And of course what would any high performance rig be without a solid state drive, the budget only allows for a 128GB. But that's more then enough space for a boot volume, and holding all of your main applications (games, photoshop, etc). If you wait until black friday (if you live inside the US) you might be able to snag a better board to pop in this build. Then you will have the ability to overclock later on, once you save up enough for a good aftermarket cooling unit. As for file storage, I imagine you have some 200-500GB old drive laying around (possibly old computer?) that you could pop in as a slave for storing data on. Again that's something you can always replace later on down the line, invest into performance first. These are all high quality components except the A880GZ which is a low budget board, but its still nice and works perfectly as it should. If you're wondering where the OS is, I always leave that out (habit). Tho again I will recommend running Windows 8 developer evaluation (valid for 3 months at a time). Which can be re-installed every 3 months over and over until Jan 2013. So I think that gives you plenty of time to save up for the OS of your choice. With this setup you should be able to run even BF3 on ultra settings out of the box. Food for thought wink.gif

FX-6300
ASRock 970 EXTREME3
SAMSUNG 830 128GB
COOLER MASTER HAF 912
SeaSonic S12II 520
8GB G.SKILL Sniper 1866
SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 7850 OC 1GB
ASUS 24X DVD Burner

SubTotal: $692.92

Edit: Updated better hardware configuration.
Edited by Warmonger - 10/29/12 at 10:52pm
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post #13 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by lacunacraft View Post

Thanks for the build list Dimaggio. that looks very solid as well. I just wish i had a way of getting an os for cheaper, but if wishes were fishes i would have a whole lot of them.
xd_1771. I play mostly league of legends and minecraft. I would like to play Starcraft 2, Deus Ex, etc. but my laptop obviously can't handle that. I also do eventually want to do streaming, but i know that would be a lot more hardware intensive and will probably be an upgrade down the line. This is really just a baseline rig for me to build off of. I mean, i am really only starting with a monitor and nothing else. I am definitely considering raising my budget if really needed. I posted this in the amd section due to amd currently having better prices. also am3+ upgrade path would be nice.

From a CPU standpoint, this is actually a pretty difficult wish list. Streaming requires CPU power, and can use multiple threads. SC2 requires CPU power, with high per-core performance (and can only use 2 cores). So for playing SC2 (the other games it matters less, they're easier to run), Intel is your best bet. But if you want to stream, you're going to need a quad-core at minimum. That means paying more for at least an i5-3450, or accepting somewhat worse SC2 performance and going with AMD.

The main problem is that there isn't a processor in the world that can manage a consistent 60 fps in late game SC2 (when maxed armies are running up against each other). FPS performance for even the best processors dips into the mid-40s, and streaming cuts into that more. Now that's still manageable, but in general folks have problems with team games running AMD processors, and have problems even in 1v1 games when streaming 480p+, problems enough that at least minor slowdows will occur on a regular basis. Will this still be a problem with the new AMD chips - almost certainly. But then, you're pretty much not going to stream SC2 at all on an i3.

There is good news. The main part is that most of this pertains only to SC2 - because SC2 + streaming is the perfect storm of CPU drain. Enough so that many of the extremely high quality SC2 streams are actually two-computer operations (one to run the game, one to encode the stream). Other games are not so much of a problem. LoL requires virtually no hardware power to run well, and you could probably play LoL & stream it on an i3 running integrated graphics. Also, most of the games you listed do not require much in the way of graphics power, so you could get a cheaper GPU if you wanted to.

If SC2/minecraft is what you play (or plan to play) all day long, and you're only kind of thinking about streaming but could do without it, the i3 is your best bet.
If streaming is something you really want to do and SC2 is just a "maybe I'll play that" thought, then you should go with an fx-6300 or fx-8300 (see xd's post above). It will be an excellent solution for you.
If you want it all without risking your budget too much, and you're willing to overclock, I'd do the following:

1) Check with AMD-knowledgeable forumers to see if the mobo XD recommended is good for a decent overclock. I assume it is because he recommended it, but can't verify that myself.
2) Take my list & replace the CPU & mobo with the fx-6300 & mobo recommended by xd above
3) Get a cheap aftermarket cooler like a xigmatek gaia, and possibly upgrade the PSU to something like a Rosewill Green 530w (not sure if that last is actually needed)
4) Cut down GPU cost to a $130-140ish GPU if necessary
5) Overclock the fx-6300 & enjoy - it might not be optimal for SC2, but you should be able to game and stream pretty well. You might find it does everything you want it to do.

P.S. Regarding OS - if you're a student you should be able to get one cheap or near free.
P.P.S If you don't want to overclock but really do want to stream - you should get take my list but replace the i3 with an i5-3450 or 3470. It'll cost, but you'll be set for most streaming situations.
Edited by MisterFred - 10/29/12 at 10:51pm
    
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post #14 of 45
If you can save up a bit more (which i think you really should) you can build a pretty good rig that will last. It's got a core i5 and a 7870. this is also includes the os. you could easily replace the i5 for a i3, but i found a pretty good deal on a ivy bridge processor. the great thing about this build is the 7870, you should be able to play all of todays games at 1080p
post #15 of 45

^ I think SC2 only gets serious FPS dips on AMD platforms under a certain condition (I think multiplayer on high settings on something) but is otherwise fairly comparable in tests. Not too sure.

post #16 of 45
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the feedback guys. I am super new to all of this. I am a long time lurker and first time builder. so i have some basic understandings of things. I figured streaming would be a stretch as that just eats resources like no tomorrow. even beefy rigs have trouble.

Also +rep to Dimaggio for finding that link. that definitely helps a lot and gives me more wiggle room.

Also thanks to Fred for the break-down. I knew SC2 was more intensive cpu wise, but never had it clearly laid out like that. definite +Rep there.
actually, +rep everyone.

Thanks for all the help.

Lots to think about now. Also, may be able to raise budget some. maybe make it a firm $700 depending.
    
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post #17 of 45
Thread Starter 
Also, should i be getting windows 8 or 7? 8 just came out and so far i have heard mixed, but mostly good things about it. what do you all think?
    
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post #18 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by lacunacraft View Post

Also, should i be getting windows 8 or 7? 8 just came out and so far i have heard mixed, but mostly good things about it. what do you all think?
Your choice really. If you can get 7 for cheaper, get 7. Unless you're going to really utilise the metro UI in windows 8, which you can only really do with touchscreen, there really isn't that much difference between the two in standard 'desktop' mode.
post #19 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by xd_1771 View Post

^ I think SC2 only gets serious FPS dips on AMD platforms under a certain condition (I think multiplayer on high settings on something) but is otherwise fairly comparable in tests. Not too sure.

Actually, graphics has nothing to do with it. The main question is the number of units in the game/on the screen (pathing, collision, & AI calculations balloon and overwhelm the CPU). The problem is pretty much absent in single-player, but SC2 is largely a multiplayer game, single-player is a bit of an afterthought for most SC2 fans.

The problem is, the dips are quite predictable and happen at the worst possible time (the later battles of a game). So while it only happens under certain conditions, those conditions come up quite a bit and at the most enjoyable moments in the game. This is quite unlike a low FPS situation in a shooter, for instance, which usually only lasts for a few seconds and is more of a stutter or blip than a prolonged slowdown that cripples your ability to control your units (play the game).

Now for 1v1s and to a lesser extent 2v2s, any modern processor should be playable, as long as you consider 30ish FPS to be playable. (A reliable 60 FPS is impossible with any CPU, despite the fact that 'average' FPS over a game can easily be above 60.**) I consider that smooth gameplay, and AMD will do fine there, particularly the new line. But a lot of people play bigger team games, and also custom maps, which can increase demand.

Streaming also increases the problem quite a bit. Slowdowns in 1v1 will be noticeable if not crippling with locked i5s while streaming at high quality (720+). Late game 1v1s on AMD processors while streaming regularly dip below 20 fps (still not quite in the crippling range, but up there in the annoying range). You'd think this additional streaming penalty could be avoided by taking the effort to exclusively assign 2 cores to SC2 and four cores to streaming for AMD processors, but for some reason this is not effective. Again, this mass of conventional wisdom & experience is largely with overclocked Phenom II x6 and Bulldozer chips. Perhaps the new ones will do better. Perhaps not, as I tend to assume the better benchmarks of the new fx-series come more from the significantly higher stock clock speeds than higher performance-per-ghz.

**Even overclocked Intel CPUs can't maintain a steady 60fps in 1v1 multiplayer battles; they'll dip to the mid-upper 40s during the more intense 1v1 scenarios. Which most people will never notice, of course, unless they're monitoring FPS.
    
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post #20 of 45
OP I have had both AMD cpu's and Intel. Although I agree Intel is SSSOOOOOOO much better, thats only cause I like benchmarking and what not. The truth is I am an avid SC2 player and AMD does just fine. I know what the online reviewers say, but they are wrong. I have noticed no difference on my 7870 on a Intel cpu or a AMD cpu, still get massive FPS either way. That was tested on my phenom x 2, x4, and 1045t, as well as my Intel 2500k and 3570k. There is really no discernible difference.

With what your doing I would not recommend wasting money going Intel. Ask XD I am almost always recommending Intel, but in this case I can say from experience makes no difference. Grab one of the FX-6300 builds and call it a day.
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