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post #81 of 106
Honestly, in the end... it sounds like Dotcom played the governments world-wide.. WON, and they're all just sore losers and are punishing everyone else and taking exceptions to their own guidelines.
If it's THAT hard to release the personal information without letting the 'back-end horrors' out as well... so be it, that's the nature of what they've taken on. Quite frankly, the people and their info/data/files are more important than their crucifixion of Dotcom. He's a greedy, bad, fat man... so are half (or more) of the people running Wall Street, the MPAA/RIAA, and every other major organization.
Give people their data back in a limited timeframe and monitor and control the flow of data. It's "hard" to do... so what, the government is all powerful and has godlike interwebz powerz... i'm sure they'll figure it out, but it needs to be done. The Fed and the MPAA have no rights to the private data of these people because Dotcom screwed up. Just because they say they do doesn't make it right. Retort to that... "So was it right what Dotcom did?!?!?"... no ones talking about Dotcom there... we're talking about the millions of normal users getting screwed. I don't care how hard the task is to get it back to them... the Fed wanted this done, the FED needs to deal with their own repurcussions.
Wait... this would require the Fed to actually take responsibility for their actions.. nevermind.. let them continue nailing Dotcom to the cross at the expense of everyone else. We'll just blame Dotcom for the Feds incompetance.
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post #82 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valor958 View Post

Honestly, in the end... it sounds like Dotcom played the governments world-wide.. WON, and they're all just sore losers and are punishing everyone else and taking exceptions to their own guidelines.
If it's THAT hard to release the personal information without letting the 'back-end horrors' out as well... so be it, that's the nature of what they've taken on. Quite frankly, the people and their info/data/files are more important than their crucifixion of Dotcom. He's a greedy, bad, fat man... so are half (or more) of the people running Wall Street, the MPAA/RIAA, and every other major organization.
Give people their data back in a limited timeframe and monitor and control the flow of data. It's "hard" to do... so what, the government is all powerful and has godlike interwebz powerz... i'm sure they'll figure it out, but it needs to be done. The Fed and the MPAA have no rights to the private data of these people because Dotcom screwed up. Just because they say they do doesn't make it right. Retort to that... "So was it right what Dotcom did?!?!?"... no ones talking about Dotcom there... we're talking about the millions of normal users getting screwed. I don't care how hard the task is to get it back to them... the Fed wanted this done, the FED needs to deal with their own repurcussions.
Wait... this would require the Fed to actually take responsibility for their actions.. nevermind.. let them continue nailing Dotcom to the cross at the expense of everyone else. We'll just blame Dotcom for the Feds incompetance.

Valor, I do agree with you. I really do, I find this to be archaic and to a degree, blown out of proportion...However, there are serious factors to consider here.

MU as of late 2011, had about 5/6 data centers. We're talking 100s of servers, spread around racks, acting as platters.

Do you have any idea how hard it is for an outsider to locate that data? Imagine being an admin and having to hack a HD in Apacha/Unix.

It's random data spread across about 100+ servers so, locating specific data for YOU would be almost impossible. UNLESS, the entire network was turned on.

Dotcom has placed preventative measures from his data being "violated"...I'm a NGINX admin and I've done so for a gig of files, for about 30 networks I've built...As an admin, I can tell you that Dotcom did the same...Any admin on OCN will tell you he put an Apache free-wipe in effect and the same goes for the Nginx back-end...That alone is making this significantly harder to give users back their data...And from all the information surrounding this, it's solid fact that Dotcom is holding it hostage.

As a business owner, the first thing I'd do is give full access to the feds and let them do their job. The DMCA prevents me from being liable for front-end data...So be it. Let's get this over with.

That's not what Dotcom did, he locked himself away, denied communication and then refused to allow the fed/MPAA to freely search...So, now, they have to go brick by brick.

That tells me, he's hiding something...Which, MU's back end is about as notorious as TPB's so, it makes sense... Unfortunately this adds enormously to the complexity of this case because now they have to legally dance around that data until they find legitimate leads and then apply for warrants.

The OWNER of MU is making this process as hard as it is, not the MPAA or the Feds or anyone else...Blame him, sue him, do whatever you want but, be logical and blame the proper people...
post #83 of 106
Masked, your user title is 100% right. You're 100% wrong. Good luck with that.
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post #84 of 106
Someone lock this thread, please.
post #85 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubers View Post

Masked, your user title is 100% right. You're 100% wrong. Good luck with that.

Instead of saying he's wrong, explain why he is wrong. It would make everything so much easier.
    
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post #86 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubers View Post

Masked, your user title is 100% right. You're 100% wrong. Good luck with that.

What, don't want to steal 150m? I mean, it's been proven he laundered 6x, was proven guilty of it 2x in court...I think we can get away with it.

Get enough start up capital...We'll bribe NZ for non-extradition laws after bribing the court system and move there...I mean, it worked for him, should work for us, right?

Don't have the cohones to follow through or don't think it will work again?

Or are you worried afterwards the officials will tell everyone we bribed them like they did for Kim? I mean, I'm clearly not worried what people will think of me because people change...Amiright?

And then ontop of that we can ditch those legitimate users and announce Mega, our new file sharing cloud that we've already invested in while the feds/MPAA lock down the old one...Should see the fallout about that but, nah, we don't care! thumb.gif
post #87 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrews2547 View Post

Instead of saying he's wrong, explain why he is wrong. It would make everything so much easier.

Tried it, it does't work since he's fixated on the guy being guilty as hell and such. I mean, if everything he said it true, why bust him for copyright more than 10 years after everything? Makes zero sense. But, then again, official statements never do.
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post #88 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubers View Post

Tried it, it does't work since he's fixated on the guy being guilty as hell and such. I mean, if everything he said it true, why bust him for copyright more than 10 years after everything? Makes zero sense. But, then again, official statements never do.

I read your opinion and I understand it but, in the same token I own a business with over 150 clients...Major clients.

If I was investigated like Kim Dotcom, was...As a business owner, I would've turned over my assets without question, hesitation or a second thought.

The owner of MU did not do that, he chose to fight, he chose to threaten to wipe the entire database, he chose that path INSTEAD of his customers.

It's been nearly 11 months of server-->server and the OWNER of that company still refuses to cooperate and has gone as far as offering a new service.

A new service in which, every corporate user of MU prior, has to pay a new, much more expensive fee, to use that service...

Being a business, or one of those legitimate users, how would you feel?

Take the MPAA out of this equation and put yourself in a legitimate user's shoes that already spent about 50k/year to be a corporate client of MU's. How do you think they feel about MU's lack of cooperation on behalf of it's owner?

You think this is the MPAA's fault entirely because Kim Dotcom is not responsible for data on his site...Well, on the front end, absolutely but, there's an equally large, un-accounted for back-end...So, again, be objective.
post #89 of 106
Sure, Kim did a lot of illegal things and should pay for his crimes. The argument here is that the material evidence was obtained through illegal means, therefore ruining the ability to try him in a court of law. The MPAA/RIAA shouldn't be able to twist the law to serve their own needs, especially illegal search and seizure.

I think the MPAA/RIAA is going to have to wait for another chance to be able to prove his guilt, there was too much done wrong in the investigation and gathering evidence for them to get a clean verdict.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Off-topic: A life sentence is a little ridiculous considering no one was physically victimized. As a musician I would rather avoid signing to a label and openly provide my materials for free download. If people really enjoy what I make then I could make it easy to donate.
post #90 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizardskill View Post

Sure, Kim did a lot of illegal things and should pay for his crimes. The argument here is that the material evidence was obtained through illegal means, therefore ruining the ability to try him in a court of law. The MPAA/RIAA shouldn't be able to twist the law to serve their own needs, especially illegal search and seizure.
I think the MPAA/RIAA is going to have to wait for another chance to be able to prove his guilt, there was too much done wrong in the investigation and gathering evidence for them to get a clean verdict. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Off-topic: A life sentence is a little ridiculous considering no one was physically victimized. As a musician I would rather avoid signing to a label and openly provide my materials for free download. If people really enjoy what I make then I could make it easy to donate.

There are multiple arguments to this case, actually and that's what my point has been.

The MPAA/RIAA are currently requesting to keep the data locked.

In the same token the Fed is formalizing a case because of what was found (Illegally) on the back-end.

Ontop of that Dotcom, himself, has caused this situation to baloon and be significantly more complicated than it initially was.

Under the DMCA, Dotcom is not guilty if copyright material is on his service. So, why not just hand it over? ~ The answer is a simple one, because of what the fed found on the back-end.

Dotcom has refused to cooperate what-so-ever since day 1. That's the problem and why (even though this has gone unstated) a large amount of the data is going server-->server.

So, there are actually several compound issues and it's just not the MPAA/RIAA filing a request, it's them filing a request on behalf of other parties, trying to add more clout to an existing situation.

If you'll read the testimony, the investigators allege that they found illegal documents above/beyond copyright infringement on the back-end in masses but, they were denied that evidence because it was obtained illegally.

Like I said, this case is complicated, it's not the simple issue of the MPAA/RIAA going after MU, you need to be objective and see this from all angles which, I've tried to present. In the future, I'll attempt to be more detailed but, complicated is an understatement, really.

In general, Dotcom being a scumbag, is largely what's causing users to not get their data...Ontop of the fact he's already invested in a new service...Of which, as I stated, current corporate users, are being asked to buy into (again).
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