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NZXT Phantom 820 * Stretched Limo Edition * [ build log ] - Page 32

post #311 of 990
Thread Starter 
Just a wee update::

I finished up the last of the custom control electronics PCBs.

This one piggybacks the flow meters board, and the relays on the left side enable me to manually turn on just the auxilliary 12V or 24V PSUs without having to power up the system.

This is important, as the 24V runs all the pump setup and I can leak test without having power to the mobo. . . and the gullwing side window runs from the 12V psu and lets me open the side window without having to power up the mobo, really important if I have some problem with the system psu, or a leak and don't want to risk additional damage by powering the system up just open the side window.

The relays also insure that both the 12V and 24V psu's automatically come on when the system is powered on normally, along with the secondary PSU for GPU 2, 3, & 4.


The relays on the right side control power to the linear actuator(s) for the side window. It lets me use a rocker switch or magnetic reed switches to raise and lower the window.

I just need to get some threaded standoffs to make it look a little cleaner.


Darlene


post #312 of 990

According to Laing Thermotech, the D5 Strong pump is the best pump for 24V. The D5 Vario has operating voltages of 8 to 14 V. I wouldn't be surprised if you managed 24V on a Vario because they are basically the same pump. But, to be safe, I would not try to get 24 V on a D5 Vario for 24/7 usage.

 

My 2 cents.

Project - ARC
(90 photos)
Project - ARC
(16 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 3930K RAMPAGE IV GENE AMD Radeon HD 7900 Series (HD7970-DC2T-3GD5) G.Skill 
RAMRAMRAMHard Drive
G. Skill G. Skill G. Skill Vertex 4 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Custom Liquid Windows 8 ASUS VS278Q-P Black ASUS VS278Q-P Black 
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Project - ARC
(90 photos)
Project - ARC
(16 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 3930K RAMPAGE IV GENE AMD Radeon HD 7900 Series (HD7970-DC2T-3GD5) G.Skill 
RAMRAMRAMHard Drive
G. Skill G. Skill G. Skill Vertex 4 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Custom Liquid Windows 8 ASUS VS278Q-P Black ASUS VS278Q-P Black 
MonitorMonitorPowerCase
ASUS VS278Q-P Black LG Flatron IPS234W (secondary monitor) Seasonic Platinum 1000w Fractal Design Arc Midi 
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post #313 of 990
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by barracks510 View Post

According to Laing Thermotech, the D5 Strong pump is the best pump for 24V. The D5 Vario has operating voltages of 8 to 14 V. I wouldn't be surprised if you managed 24V on a Vario because they are basically the same pump. But, to be safe, I would not try to get 24 V on a D5 Vario for 24/7 usage.

My 2 cents.


This is the PWM version, not the Vario.

It is rated to 24V, and has a small benefit at that level, as verified by Martin's testing and review, though unless there's an additional need to have it powered from a seperate power supply, is not enough advantage by itself to set it up that way.

I want / need to be able to run the loops, leak tests etc. without powering up the mobo, so I do have that additional need for a seperate power supply dedicated to the pumps, so in that case, I'll go for the however small advantage, and use the 24V supply.

The cost is the same whether 12V or 24V:
24Volt : http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_2094881_-1
12Volt: http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_2094872_-1

It would be nice if it gave as much "extra" at 24V as the D5 S version, but it's not quite there.

Here's Martin's testing on it:

http://martinsliquidlab.org/2012/12/25/swiftech-mcp-655-pwm-drive-pump-review/

Darlene
Edited by IT Diva - 1/18/13 at 5:11am
post #314 of 990
Thread Starter 
Just a little update:


I got the top chassis panel and the lower chassis panel prepped, jigged, and ready to go to the welders this week.

It will be nice to get back to doing updates where you can really see something that looks new from the last update pics.


I also wanted to do some testing with the acrylic tubing and the dual D5 pump setup to see if I was going to have any joint failure or leak issues.

I also wanted to see if going from 1/2" ID tubing from the res to the pump inlet to 3/8" ID acrylic tube was going to hurt the flow rate.


Fortunately there was no drop in flow rate, and nothing leaked or blew apart. thumb.gifthumb.gif

I was a bit surprised that nothing leaked, as the acrylic tube fittings have been on and off a number of times, and the o rings were abused when they were removed to bore the fittings to full 1/2" . . and then put back.


I ordered the next big bunch of water cooling gear Friday, res's, pumps, mod-kits, flow meters, as well as sleeving, connectors & pins, and fittings to do the res mods on the next 2 res's, so progress should be steady.


Darlene












Edited by IT Diva - 1/20/13 at 12:59pm
post #315 of 990
I really really really want that reservoir
post #316 of 990
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaitWhat View Post

I really really really want that reservoir

I can't wait to see what all three of them look like . .

I also ordered some aurora red, to see how it looks with the res mods.

Much easier now to experiment, and change plans if necessary, than once everything is in place.

Darlene
post #317 of 990
were they hard to make?

Yeah it's all looking really good, kudos to you

This is the thread I look forward to most when I check subs
post #318 of 990
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaitWhat View Post

were they hard to make?

Yeah it's all looking really good, kudos to you

This is the thread I look forward to most when I check subs


The first one is always harder than the ones that follow, but things went exactly as expected for the light tube mod, but it would have been nicer and easier if the res was about 5mm larger in diameter when it came to adding the jet tube.


The Bitspower res's, water tanks as they call them, lend themselves to these mods because they have 3 connections (triangularly layed out) on one end, and a single center connection at the other.

All the connections are tapped all the way thru the caps, so you can screw fittings on from inside and outside.

To do the light mod, you need 4 fittings:

1) http://www.frozencpu.com/products/10741/ex-tub-666/Bitspower_SLI_Crossfire_Multi-Link_Adapter_Pair_-_Silver_Shining_BP-WTP-C47.html
1) http://www.frozencpu.com/products/12746/ex-tub-816/Bitspower_G14_Silver_Shining_Multi-Link_Adapter_BP-WTP-C68.html
2) http://www.frozencpu.com/products/6943/ex-tub-167/Bitspower_Lighted_Crystal_LED_G14_Plug_without_LED_BP-ACSTI-BK.html

An appropriate length of acrylic tube, 1/2" OD by 3/8" or 8mm ID.

1) 6-32 stainless steel screw . . . length isn't critical, but an allen head about 2" long works fine as you need to cut all but 1/4" to 5/16" of the threads off, and all but 1/4" to 5/16" of the unthreaded part off.

And finally, a ccfl lamp of the appropriate length.


Use the G1/4 male threaded multi link fitting on the inside of the single hole cap, and the female threaded multi link fitting on the other end of the tube, with one of the LED caps securing the female G1/4 end.

Cut your tubing to just barely fit between the res's endcaps when they are screwed on, and with both fittings securely on the tubing. about 1/16" gap is fine

Once you have your tube assembly fabricated, you need to drill and tap the 3 connection end cap, right in the center, on the INSIDE
Drill about 3/4 of the way thru, NOT all the way thru . . . . tap the hole, and cut your 6-32 screw as described, and screw it into the end cap.
Use the pic in post 295 to get a detailed look.

That's your support for the free end of the light tube so that it can't be moved about by turbulence, and cause it to leak.

It's a good idea to assemble everything and leak test now, before you put a lamp in the tube.

I got my ccfl lamps by taking some of these apart: Pick a size that's appropriate for your res.

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/10445/lit-206/Logisys_15_Cold_Cathode_Replacement_Tube_-_White.html?tl=g6c443s1146#blank

Once you get it safely apart, you'll need to either remove the connector, or have bought pins, in which case you could cut the connector off and not have to be so careful about removing the pins. CCFL pins are wicked azz hard to get out without destroying them. plan ahead

Now take the second led cap and drill the led hole the rest of the way thru.
Feed the ccfl lamp wires thru the cap and reinstall the connector.

If your newly installed light tube has passed the leak test, you can put in the lamp and cap, and power it up.


Refer to K.3nny 's posts to find his little tutorial on using acrylic tubing.

It will be easier to slightly reduce the tubing OD on each end as he suggests, to fit the Bitspower multi link fittings without modifying them.

There ya go, easy as pie . .

Darlene
Edited by IT Diva - 1/20/13 at 2:39pm
post #319 of 990
Thankyou for typing that out, will be really helpful when I can get around to doing it
post #320 of 990
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaitWhat View Post

Thankyou for typing that out, will be really helpful when I can get around to doing it


No Problemo,

You may not be the only one who would like to do that.

It'll work on pretty much any size res, with either horizontal, or the more normal, verticle mounting position.


Darlene
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