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post #11 of 15
LGA 2011 has an upgrade path - LGA 1155 doesn't. I'm selling my i7 3820 for $245 shipped..2 months old...just sayin'
AMD has Ryzen
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Ryzen 7 1700 ASRock AB350 Gaming-ITX EVGA GTX 1060 3GB ACX 2.0 16GB Crucial DDR4 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
256GB Crucial SSD Stock RGB Cooler Windows 10 Professional 64 Two KG241Q 75HZ monitors 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Velocifire Brown Switch 10-Keyless. 750W Rosewill Glacier modular.  Thermaltake Core Mini ITX  Logitech G502 Spectrum 
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AMD has Ryzen
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Ryzen 7 1700 ASRock AB350 Gaming-ITX EVGA GTX 1060 3GB ACX 2.0 16GB Crucial DDR4 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
256GB Crucial SSD Stock RGB Cooler Windows 10 Professional 64 Two KG241Q 75HZ monitors 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Velocifire Brown Switch 10-Keyless. 750W Rosewill Glacier modular.  Thermaltake Core Mini ITX  Logitech G502 Spectrum 
Audio
Superlux 681 w/ HM5 pads.  
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post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx86 View Post

I hear a lot of people saying go with LGA 2011 so you can upgrade to Ivy-E when they are available.

Yes, multiple sources say this. I am planing to build a second pc. This makes me feel more confortable going to LGA 2011. biggrin.gif
Edited by Pseudopsia Kite - 11/12/12 at 10:28pm
post #13 of 15
Oh, sorry, don't listen to me, I actually know nothing about LGA 2011 rolleyes.gif

I was expecting 2011 to be another one of those sockets that they would only make like, 2 or 3 chips for
Edited by TheLastNarwal - 11/13/12 at 1:14pm
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i3 2120 GA-B75M-D3H EVGA GeForce GTX 460 1GB SC 4GB Corsair Vengeance 1600MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
1TB Western Digital usually doesnt open Arctic Cooling Alpine 11 Windows 7 64-bit 
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Compaq S2021a Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Thermaltake 430 Bitfenix Shinobi White 
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boring desk Turtle Beach X12 
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i3 2120 GA-B75M-D3H EVGA GeForce GTX 460 1GB SC 4GB Corsair Vengeance 1600MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
1TB Western Digital usually doesnt open Arctic Cooling Alpine 11 Windows 7 64-bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Compaq S2021a Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Thermaltake 430 Bitfenix Shinobi White 
MouseMouse PadAudio
boring desk Turtle Beach X12 
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post #14 of 15
I like your build except for two parts: The motherboard and the PSU.

The Motherboard: I'm really just being an "Asus fanboy" here... maybe... I have an i7-3930K build, in which I used the Asus P9X79 Deluxe. It has been a fantastic board, and I've ctually installed all the silly crapware that they give you on CD. Turns out that I really like that CD junk and it adds a lot of value to the board.

The PSU: This is a pretty important part of a build. You want something that is going to provide rock-solid power to the most expensive parts of your system, so you need something that is absolutely clean and reliable. I would recommend a Seasonic, Corsair, or XFX PSU (all three are basically built by Seasonic, which is one of, if not THE, best PSU manufacturer(s) on the market). Antec and PC Power and Cooling make good PSUs, too, but PC Power and Cooling doesn't make modular supplies, nor are they very "pretty".

I also don't have any experience with G.Skill, but practically everyone buys they stuff because it is inexpensive. I'm wary of stuff that is a lot cheaper than everything else, so I haven't taken the leap, yet.

Have you looked at the differences between the Samsung 840 and the 840 Pro models? I've not delved into the differences, but most of the glowing reviews seem to be referencing the 840 Pros.

You will love your 3930K. Having access to 32GB of quad-channel memory really makes Adobe applications happy, and having 6 hyperthreading cores seriously helps when you're running a video encode. I do ffmpeg x264 encodes on one of my virtual machines that only has access to 2 cores, and it can run a 720p single-pass transcode almost in realtime. Dedicating all of the cores to that job would just fly.
post #15 of 15
Having lots of RAM is beneficial during video editing. You can build a RAM preview, rather than full render, which results in fluid playback during editing. The more the better.
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