Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › Looking to get into Linux
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Looking to get into Linux - Page 2

post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky 23 View Post

Linux Mint 13 thumb.gif

THIS, preferably cinnamon.
Boinzy
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 3570k 4.2Ghz Gigabyte GA-Z77-DS3H  XFX R9 280x TDFD 3GB G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
TOSHIBA X300 HDWE160XZSTA 6TB 7200 RPM Samsung 850 Evo 250GB Asus DRW-24B1ST Cooler Master 212+ 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 Pro 64 bit Acer GN246HL Nixeus Moda Pro Mechanical Keyboard Cherry MX B... Antec Earthwatts 650W 
CaseMouseAudio
Thermaltake Chaser A41 Logitech G400 Bose Companion 2 
  hide details  
Reply
Boinzy
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 3570k 4.2Ghz Gigabyte GA-Z77-DS3H  XFX R9 280x TDFD 3GB G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
TOSHIBA X300 HDWE160XZSTA 6TB 7200 RPM Samsung 850 Evo 250GB Asus DRW-24B1ST Cooler Master 212+ 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 Pro 64 bit Acer GN246HL Nixeus Moda Pro Mechanical Keyboard Cherry MX B... Antec Earthwatts 650W 
CaseMouseAudio
Thermaltake Chaser A41 Logitech G400 Bose Companion 2 
  hide details  
Reply
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkRyu View Post

OK just the answers that i was looking for .. thanks and +rep to all who answered
EDIT: how big should the usb be? 2gig or 4 gig? or even 1 gig?

For ripping an ISO to, usually 1GB is all you need, depends on the distro as some are bigger but most are in the 700-800MB range.

For installing to a USB directly, I'd say 4-5GB towards root, then add on how much personal file space you want/need to that ( usually 8GB is pretty comfortable ).
post #13 of 31
here you well need this.
http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/
when you open it click agree
then in the first drop down box find the linux distro you want (get mint it is very easy to use). then after you found the distro you want click the box that says download the ios file and you can find your way from there.

Once you have your usb just boot from usb and play around on it and see if its for you and, if it is click the cd on the desktop and start your install.
post #14 of 31
Just want to echo what everyone has said regarding Ubuntu. It was my first foray into the world of Linux and I love it.

You should be just fine with an 8-16gig USB drive.
post #15 of 31
I prefer LMDE over ubuntu

http://www.linuxmint.com/download_lmde.php

its thiner then ubuntu and works as well if not better
post #16 of 31
@OP

I have Mint 13 KDE on my workstation, and Mint 13 XFCE on a server. Big KDE lover for day-to-day stuff, and XFCE is light enough to run on a server without swallowing too many resources.
Ryzen
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Ryzen 7 1700 Gigabyte GA-AB350M Gaming 3 Palit GT-430 Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK16GX4M2B3000C15 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 850 EVO AMD Wraith Spire Linux Mint 18.x Dell UltraSharp U2414H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Apple Basic Keyboard Thermaltake ToughPower 850W Lian-Li PC-A04B Logitech Trackman Wheel 
  hide details  
Reply
Ryzen
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Ryzen 7 1700 Gigabyte GA-AB350M Gaming 3 Palit GT-430 Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK16GX4M2B3000C15 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 850 EVO AMD Wraith Spire Linux Mint 18.x Dell UltraSharp U2414H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Apple Basic Keyboard Thermaltake ToughPower 850W Lian-Li PC-A04B Logitech Trackman Wheel 
  hide details  
Reply
post #17 of 31
The main importance is sticking with a particular distro that uses a similar package manager/softtware installer/graphical interface that you're comfortable with. For me, I think the Synaptic/.Deb way is better than YUM/RPM/, so I stick with a distro like Debian, Ubuntu, Mint and ones that are primarily Gnome based.

I stay away from SuSE, Fedora, Mandriva, ect because they are predominately KDE based, and I don't like the way they install its software. But that's my preference. Most distros just work better with KDE and some work better with Gnome/Mate/Cinnamon.
Edited by aweir - 11/29/12 at 7:42pm
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aweir View Post

The main importance is sticking with a particular distro that uses a similar package manager/softtware installer/graphical interface that you're comfortable with. For me, I think the Synaptic/.Deb way is better than YUM/RPM/, so I stick with a distro like Debian, Ubuntu, Mint and ones that are primarily Gnome based.
I stay away from SuSE, Fedora, Mandriva, ect because they are predominately KDE based, and I don't like the way they install its software. But that's my preference. Most distros just work better with KDE and some work better with Gnome/Mate/Cinnamon.

Depends, most debian based distributions work either way honestly. Also, Fedora goes both ways as it's DE of choice IS gnome but trust me when I say KDE works fine. Though you are right, package management is a huge choice to the end user if they really want to get into things. I do not like how rpm packages are made, the whole process is annoying compared to deb based work. I'd much rather build a deb than an rpm, just my opinion.

[edit] Final note, I forgot to tack on package managers are also a huge deal IMO. Depending on the distro and how often they push updates but each package type has it's own manager (generally). There are a few universal ones but most distros stick to package specific ones.
Edited by mushroomboy - 11/30/12 at 3:51am
Current Rig
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 4.6GHz@1.44v GA-990FXA-UD3 R4.0 HD 7950 (1100/1450) 8G Muskin DDR3 1866@8CLS 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
1TB WD LiteOn DVD-RW DL Linux/Windows 19" Phillips TV 1080p 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
OCZ 600W Generic Junk Logitech MX400 Generic Junk 
Audio
SBL 5.1 
  hide details  
Reply
Current Rig
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 4.6GHz@1.44v GA-990FXA-UD3 R4.0 HD 7950 (1100/1450) 8G Muskin DDR3 1866@8CLS 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
1TB WD LiteOn DVD-RW DL Linux/Windows 19" Phillips TV 1080p 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
OCZ 600W Generic Junk Logitech MX400 Generic Junk 
Audio
SBL 5.1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #19 of 31
DELETE-- accidental double post
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mushroomboy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by aweir View Post

The main importance is sticking with a particular distro that uses a similar package manager/softtware installer/graphical interface that you're comfortable with. For me, I think the Synaptic/.Deb way is better than YUM/RPM/, so I stick with a distro like Debian, Ubuntu, Mint and ones that are primarily Gnome based.
I stay away from SuSE, Fedora, Mandriva, ect because they are predominately KDE based, and I don't like the way they install its software. But that's my preference. Most distros just work better with KDE and some work better with Gnome/Mate/Cinnamon.

Depends, most debian based distributions work either way honestly. Also, Fedora goes both ways as it's DE of choice IS gnome but trust me when I say KDE works fine. Though you are right, package management is a huge choice to the end user if they really want to get into things. I do not like how rpm packages are made, the whole process is annoying compared to deb based work. I'd much rather build a deb than an rpm, just my opinion.

[edit] Final note, I forgot to tack on package managers are also a huge deal IMO. Depending on the distro and how often they push updates but each package type has it's own manager (generally). There are a few universal ones but most distros stick to package specific ones.

the biggest thing is the updates and how the distro manages the repos. debian will test test test. while fedora and arch push things right away. as for YUM/APT, apt is a bit faster (although I haven't really noticed) and does upgrades better, while yum does other things better like automaticlly removes uneeded packages. the difference is small at best
Edited by jrl1357 - 11/30/12 at 12:59pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Linux, Unix
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › Looking to get into Linux