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min/max cpu multiplier locked?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
hi everyone! well its my first time on these forums and im just seriously having a problem with my processor. while playing games i notice a lag in almost all of them sometime it doesnt happen for a while then it will just have a very bad stutter until i restart my computer. so i ran cpu-z and the task manager to watch my cpu while playing intense game and found that it is maxing while playing at 100% and looked up as much as i could about overclocking because frankly i dont have the funds for a new cpu and i changed my cpu's multiplier to 10 but it never applied to my system. i looked at everast and it says it has a min/max of 6/8 multiplier. is there a way around this so i can overclock it? or is it impossible?

my specs are:
Operating system: Windows 7 ultimate 64-bit
Processor: Intel core 2 duo e8200 @2.66 GHz
Motherboard: Dell XPS 630i
RAM: !GB x4
GPU: Nvidia 270 GTX
BIOS: Pheonix Award build a13
post #2 of 19
You can't overclock on that motherboard. Pre-built machines don't have provisions for adjusting the necessary settings in the BIOS.
post #3 of 19
If its an OEM (off the shelf) PC, the BIOS is locked, so limited or no OCing frown.gif
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
ohh okay i got this rig in 2008 from dell i irdered from them so i guess ill have to look into another processor. would you guys happen to know what would fit my mother board in terms of series of processors?
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarguy18 View Post

ohh okay i got this rig in 2008 from dell i irdered from them so i guess ill have to look into another processor. would you guys happen to know what would fit my mother board in terms of series of processors?

Its not just the CPU my friend, its the bios thats built into the mobo.

Unless things have changed radically since I moved from OEM PCs, I think you need a new mobo and chip frown.gif
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
well i know absolutely nothing about motherboards, is there a certain size with motherboards or are they a standard size im pretty adept with putting in hardware inside my pc so im sure i can figure out how to do a motherbaord i just want to find out the specifics of what i need/ can get before i buy one :/
post #7 of 19
How much money are you willing to spend?
post #8 of 19
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I figured someone had to let you know:

You will basically need to change everything.

Dell cases are proprietary bull, meaning that you cannot fit a new motherboard into their case. While all motherboards are standardized sizes (ATX, microatx, mini atx, etc), dell uses a special form with unique screw holes that are specific to only dell motherboards. Furthermore, their cooling (last I checked) is also proprietary, and is impossible to put on a new motherboard. Once again you also cannot put a new cooler in a dell case.

Effectively, you will need to change the:

-case
-motherboard
-power supply (dell ones suck)
-probably ram

A frankenbuild from dell parts NEVER ends up working out well, take it from me on that one. I believe dell psus are also proprietary, meaning they wont fit in a new case. And Dell memory in particular is not great in otherboards: its cheap rebranded value ram from strange manufacturers in some instances, and is usually low quality and slow. Considering an 8gb ram kit is like 30/40$ now a days, it would be much easier on you to replace that along with the board, as its very possible dell ram will give you headaches.


Further at this point its a waste of money to upgrade those parts. To buy a new motherboard for that aging processor, and by extension, an old retired processor socket, is a waste of $ b/c you wont be able to drop any new hardware from the past few years into it. The next time you'd want to upgrade, you'd have to buy new motherboard, ram, AND a cpu now.

Basically: its worth it to hold out until you can do a new build, as you have to replace the CPU, motherboard, ram, case, power supply to make it truly cost effective. To drop even 100$ into "upgrades" for that computer will really see you no gains in terms of gaming performance, and will just be wasted funds that could've otherwise gone towards a new computer.


The cpu you have isn't bad exactly, but rather limited by the board and other components. Which is unfortunate, because you could get some more use out of that thing. It just ends up being more than its worth, literally. Try and stick it out until you can do a new build, as you really will just be throwing $ at this for no benefit to you. Spending the $ just to overclock that aged processor? Like I said, even 100$ could buy you a cheap NEW motherboard, and cheap processor. But that would be worth it times a million, because when you'd want to upgrade it it would be possible. The LGA 775 socket is dead in all but name. Meaning no new CPUs are being made for it.

It'd be like fixing an old toaster for 30$. Sure, you can fix it, and sure it will get more life out of it. But why do that when a new fancy one with an LCD screen and digital setting costs 80$?
-(And for the unclear: just an example people!)

I went through something similar this past summer. My old socket T died. My motherboard went. But to buy an old 775 motherboard, the only one available even only took ddr3 ram, and the total cost was like 100$ at that point (its weird how OLD hardware can in some instances cost MORE than new; guess things in production drop in cost). If it had been like 50$ i would've done it, but It definitely was not worth it at that price. I held out until I could do a complete build, which ended up costing under 700$. Yes quite a bit more $, but overall the more cost effective solution.

Furthermore, yours isn't even broken so its pretty hard to justify spending anything. AT least to me.
Edited by kmac20 - 11/21/12 at 8:09am
    
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post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmac20 View Post

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I figured someone had to let you know:
You will basically need to change everything.
Dell cases are proprietary bull, meaning that you cannot fit a new motherboard into their case. While all motherboards are standardized sizes (ATX, microatx, mini atx, etc), dell uses a special form with unique screw holes that are specific to only dell motherboards. Furthermore, their cooling (last I checked) is also proprietary, and is impossible to put on a new motherboard. Once again you also cannot put a new cooler in a dell case.
Effectively, you will need to change the:
-case
-motherboard
-power supply (dell ones suck)
-probably ram
A frankenbuild from dell parts NEVER ends up working out well, take it from me on that one. I believe dell psus are also proprietary, meaning they wont fit in a new case. And Dell memory in particular is not great in otherboards: its cheap rebranded value ram from strange manufacturers in some instances, and is usually low quality and slow. Considering an 8gb ram kit is like 30/40$ now a days, it would be much easier on you to replace that along with the board, as its very possible dell ram will give you headaches.
Further at this point its a waste of money to upgrade those parts. To buy a new motherboard for that aging processor, and by extension, an old retired processor socket, is a waste of $ b/c you wont be able to drop any new hardware from the past few years into it. The next time you'd want to upgrade, you'd have to buy new motherboard, ram, AND a cpu now.
Basically: its worth it to hold out until you can do a new build, as you have to replace the CPU, motherboard, ram, case, power supply to make it truly cost effective. To drop even 100$ into "upgrades" for that computer will really see you no gains in terms of gaming performance, and will just be wasted funds that could've otherwise gone towards a new computer.
The cpu you have isn't bad exactly, but rather limited by the board and other components. Which is unfortunate, because you could get some more use out of that thing. It just ends up being more than its worth, literally. Try and stick it out until you can do a new build, as you really will just be throwing $ at this for no benefit to you. Spending the $ just to overclock that aged processor? Like I said, even 100$ could buy you a cheap NEW motherboard, and cheap processor. But that would be worth it times a million, because when you'd want to upgrade it it would be possible. The LGA 775 socket is dead in all but name. Meaning no new CPUs are being made for it.
It'd be like fixing an old toaster for 30$. Sure, you can fix it, and sure it will get more life out of it. But why do that when a new fancy one with an LCD screen and digital setting costs 80$?
-(And for the unclear: just an example people!)
I went through something similar this past summer. My old socket T died. My motherboard went. But to buy an old 775 motherboard, the only one available even only took ddr3 ram, and the total cost was like 100$ at that point (its weird how OLD hardware can in some instances cost MORE than new; guess things in production drop in cost). If it had been like 50$ i would've done it, but It definitely was not worth it at that price. I held out until I could do a complete build, which ended up costing under 700$. Yes quite a bit more $, but overall the more cost effective solution.
Furthermore, yours isn't even broken so its pretty hard to justify spending anything. AT least to me.
While much of this was true in the past, Dell currently uses standard components in their consumer systems. I looked up OP's model and it all appears to be standard, not proprietary, components.
post #10 of 19
If you're right then I stand 100% corrected. But as far as I recall, it wasn't that their components weren't "standard". I had a intel board you could buy elsewhere. Rather the manner of mounting it to the case was proprietary. Weird screw holes, clips in some cases that wouldn't fit on other boards/coolers. Just a weird build using a lot of green plastics.

Once again, I could be totally wrong. As I said in my post this was the last time I had one and tried using it. That was awhile ago, and I admit I could be totally mistaken in regards to their new ones. Especially if you looked up his model.

Hopefully I am wrong, as that would save OP a quite a bit of $$$

I guess the easiest way to find out is to open your PC!
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
3570k Gigabyte z77x-ud3h MSI 7850 Kingston HyperX Blu 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
OCZ Vertex 4  Western Digital 2500YS Seagate Barracuda Samsung DVD/RW 
CoolingOSPowerCase
CoolerMaster 212 evo Windows 7 Ultimate XION PowerReal 600W NZXT Nemesis Elite 
MouseMouse PadAudio
MX518 MicroCenter $1 Mousepad Soundblaster Audigy 2 ZS 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
3570k Gigabyte z77x-ud3h MSI 7850 Kingston HyperX Blu 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
OCZ Vertex 4  Western Digital 2500YS Seagate Barracuda Samsung DVD/RW 
CoolingOSPowerCase
CoolerMaster 212 evo Windows 7 Ultimate XION PowerReal 600W NZXT Nemesis Elite 
MouseMouse PadAudio
MX518 MicroCenter $1 Mousepad Soundblaster Audigy 2 ZS 
  hide details  
Reply
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