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Ubuntu Partioning

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hey guys i'm about to instal ubuntu because i'm a noob and don't want to try fedora or anything else. So when i'm installing it it gives me a screen that says instal root, home or some other garbage like that. I have a 120gb HDD and i'm giving ubuntu 30gb i know i'm crazy. Windows will be my primary OS. And i'm sorry for all u linux fanboys i'm just trying it out plz don't convince me to make it my primary OS of choice. I only have 1 pc so yeah. + i game so that's out of the question. I'm writing this in school hopefully i will have the answer by the time i get home in 4 hours to install ubuntu. I will have a fellow linux geek with me also.
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post #2 of 6
ermm what is the question ?
    
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post #3 of 6
lol 30GB for a linux partition lol 10GB is plenty even with a crap load of apps you would only need maybe 8GB if that if your looking to learn linux might I recommend

http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

ubuntu is very user friendly shouldn't need to manually partition at all it will recomment you a partioning scheme and if you chose to follow it the installer will do all the work for you........

just as a note though if you plan on adding any apps be sure you give your

"/ " partition atleast 2GB of space...IMHO
if you manually partition this will normally be your
"/usr" partition in your extended logical partion of you primary linux partition

If this makes no sense to you dont worry your linux buddy will understand and if he doesn't then get new friends!!!!


I prefer SuSE 10.1 seems to be the best linux so far imho!!!! and still very easy to use
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post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamme View Post
lol 30GB for a linux partition lol 10GB is plenty even with a crap load of apps you would only need maybe 8GB if that if your looking to learn linux might I recommend

http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/


ubuntu is very user friendly shouldn't need to manually partition at all it will recomment you a partioning scheme and if you chose to follow it the installer will do all the work for you........

just as a note though if you plan on adding any apps be sure you give your

"/ " partition atleast 2GB of space...IMHO
if you manually partition this will normally be your
"/usr" partition in your extended logical partion of you primary linux partition

If this makes no sense to you dont worry your linux buddy will understand and if he doesn't then get new friends!!!!


I prefer SuSE 10.1 seems to be the best linux so far imho!!!! and still very easy to use
LOL,,,,,LFS,,,not for a n00b. He would pull his hair out. EDIT: sorry did not mean that to sound harsh, and yes if you later really want to learn everything there is to know about how linux works then LFS is great. Just don't look into it right now is all that I meant.

Well if the partition is already made then make sure its not formated then, during the install select to do the partition part yourself, then just make a 2GB swap partition and the rest / in ext3 format. That will be fine since your just using it to learn and mess with. Make sure to install and set up GRUB correctly.
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post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
hobo what's a swap partition and what is the ext3 format one? If i want the 80gb part to be master what should it be"root, swap, ext3, or w/e? If i want the 30gb one to be the secondary what should it be "root, swap,ext3, or w/e

Both partitions on my HD are formated NTFS. When i instal ubuntu will it change it to w/e file system needed?
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post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metalica732 View Post
hobo what's a swap partition and what is the ext3 format one? If i want the 80gb part to be master what should it be"root, swap, ext3, or w/e? If i want the 30gb one to be the secondary what should it be "root, swap,ext3, or w/e

Both partitions on my HD are formated NTFS. When i instal ubuntu will it change it to w/e file system needed?
Hey, sorry to take so long to respond, been driving home from college, yea for thanksgiving break.

Anyway, a swap partition is uses after the system RAM is used up basically, like extra memory. If the RAM is full it'll write the pages to swap in order to free up some RAM.
ext3 is a filesystem format like NTFS. Leave the windows partition as is and in windows get rid of the NTFS format on the other partition, just to make sure its go smoothly. the slash mark "/" means root. In *nix you have to label the partitions that the system uses. (/, /boot, /usr, /home, /var, /tmp, /opt) are a few but to make things easy for you, you can just make the swap partition which is given no label (like / or /boot, etc) and then the root partition (the rest of the 30gb) and give it the label /
You don't need to mess with master or secondary, Linux will see the NTFS partition in the partition editor.

just make 100% sure that it doesn't use the whole drive. I installed Ubuntu 6.10 last night on my second rig and during the install when it got to the partition part it only had two options for my (use whole drive or partition drive yourself). It might have one that says use remaining free space if the 30gb is not formated. If it is then you'll probably need to choose the option to do it yourself and then do like I said above. Make a swap and root partition. Swap is given no format and for the root partition choose ext3.
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