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Asus VG248QE 144hz 1ms TN 1080p - Page 129

post #1281 of 2231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naviblue View Post

No, I really do mean the BENQ XL2420T. The Benq XL2411T is not readily available here in the U.S.
Yes, but the XL2411T can be had for less than $300 from overclockers.co.uk, with $50 shipping to North America. That's how I got the XL2411T.

Be warned, both the XL2420T and the VG278HE (the "HE" model is worse than "H") have a worse looking checkerboard pixel artifact during LightBoost motion, than both the XL2411T and VG248QE.

hazmatm tested VG278H and VG278HE side-by-side. Also, I've gotten three other reports that users found the VG278H has less LightBoost trailing artifacts than the VG278HE.
post #1282 of 2231
If the XL2420T is anything like the VG278HE I had, then it is absolutely no contest, I take back what I said and avoid the XL2420T like the plague! If the XL2420T is like the VG278H I had then there is nothing really wrong with it but the VG248QE is just better (less double image, smoother lightboost noticeable in game and in pixperan).


To give a detailed analysis of the three:

There was a noticeable difference between the VG278HE and VG278H, the HE had a severe dark purple double image that was very noticeable on the desktop web browsing etc (which has a lot of dark colours against light colours so this sort of things stands out), and during movement straight lines appeared fuzzy (pixel checkerboard artifact). The fuzzinesss was so bad if there was some small sized text in a game and that text moved across the screen you could barely read it.

The VG278H fixed these issues, had a minimal amount of light double image that is easily ignored, and no fuzzy pixel checkerboard problems. The VG248QE takes the improvement further, I can't notice double image and the lightboost is even smoother.


As for colours:
Colours between the VG278H and VG248QE (or XL2411T): Unfortunately I have since sold the VG278H so I can't compare them side-by-side any more. But I will say this, once you use any monitor for a couple days the colour differences fades to nothing. You really can't tell at all unless you have something to compare them to. I have my XL2411T (aka VG248QE) set up with spot on colours during lightboost, so much so that even switching between lightboost and non lightboost is nothing more than a slight acknowledgement that lightboost is more washed out; and then you forget it completely.

I do recall that the VG278H had its own problems with colours in lightboost, which I spent ages calibrating out manually. I had to do the same with the XL2411T (VG248QE), so unless the XL2420T is amazing in colours I would say ignore this factor and go for the VG248QE.



The only time you really miss colours is on the desktop, or in super dark games, and that only if you are remembering your old IPS panel - not comparing TN to TN.
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post #1283 of 2231
Quote:
f the XL2420T is anything like the VG278HE I had, then it is absolutely no contest, I take back what I said and avoid the XL2420T like the plague! If the XL2420T is like the VG278H I had then there is nothing really wrong with it but the VG248QE is just better (less double image, smoother lightboost noticeable in game and in pixperan).
We don't know if the XL2420T checkerboard artifact is as *BAD* as the VG278HE. It could have been a defective XL2420T. The checkerboard artifact screenshot image is from an XL2420T user.

Regardless of how bad it might be, you will have lower risk of LightBoost artifacts if you buy a BENQ XL2411T -- both of the two new 1ms monitors have cleaner LightBoost trailing. Go to overclockers.co.uk and pay the $50 extra. I got my XL2411T for only ~$300 plus $50 shipping from the opposite side of the Atlantic.

The XL2420T may have better colors than the XL2411T, but this might be irrelevant if you always run in LightBoost mode 100% of the time, like I do. The "amplified LCD inversion" LightBoost trailing artifact found on VG278HE (and certain other models) is the worse of evils for such users, IMHO. So if you can see it in the screenshot, I'm going to recommend buying the XL2411T or VG248QE for LightBoost. Even the VG278H probably is better (Especially when toned down to 65% contrast)
post #1284 of 2231
Is there anyone who's been working on software to make light boost easier to toggle on and off? Or do we have to wait for Nvidia to release their next set of drivers hopefully supporting this feature?

Also since like this is only limited to 100 Hz and 120 Hz right now, some people are reporting eyestrain because of the flickering even at 120 Hz. I think it would be awesome to be able to enable light boost at 144 Hz. Is this something obtainable through software?

Asus 144 monitor. has anyone tried overclocking the refresh rate of this monitor beyond 144 Hz?
post #1285 of 2231
Quote:
Originally Posted by ovawe View Post

Is there anyone who's been working on software to make light boost easier to toggle on and off? Or do we have to wait for Nvidia to release their next set of drivers hopefully supporting this feature?
There is work under way over the next few months towards this....

To begin with, you can already make it easy to toggle LightBoost on/off but it requires a bit of jumping through the hoops to set things up -- e.g. creating custom resolutions with smaller vertical totals (non-Lightboost) and larger vertical totals (LightBoost), and assigning them to different refresh rates (e.g. 119 Hz non-LightBoost and 120 Hz LightBoost). Then using a utility such as entechtaiwan's multires.exe to do quick switching between refresh rates, to enable/disable LightBoost. Someone should export a ToastyX CRU file (.bin) that provides these settings to easily switch between.
Quote:
Also since like this is only limited to 100 Hz and 120 Hz right now, some people are reporting eyestrain because of the flickering even at 120 Hz. I think it would be awesome to be able to enable light boost at 144 Hz. Is this something obtainable through software?
No. This is not possible in current LightBoost monitors (yet), because LightBoost requires the artificial modification of the LCD scanout -- StrobeMaster on HardForum reverse engineered a little bit of LightBoost and found that partial frame buffering is done, followed by an accelerated LCD scanout, to create additional idle time between LCD refreshes, necessary for pixel persistence settling, then the strobe. This actually means panel is already refreshing in a faster scan-out during LightBoost 120 Hz, than it is during non-LightBoost 144 Hz, due to the necessity of creating an extra pause between the LCD refreshes (needed for the strobes).
post #1286 of 2231
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdrejhon View Post

...followed by an accelerated LCD scanout, to create additional idle time between LCD refreshes, necessary for pixel persistence settling, then the strobe. This actually means panel is already refreshing in a faster scan-out during LightBoost 120 Hz, than it is during non-LightBoost 144 Hz, due to the necessity of creating an extra pause between the LCD refreshes (needed for the strobes).

Can you comment on the effect this has on the paralellogramic warping that happens in games? (due to the delay between the first line and last line, vertical references appear tilted during fast pans). Is this still visible in lightboost displays?
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post #1287 of 2231
I see. i thought about programming software that does black frame insertion throughout Windows in any game in any application. So black frame insertion at 144 Hz. It could work on linux as well.

If we do black frame insertion at 144 Hz, then the Flickr would be at 72 Hz I think So mame's black frame insertion works at 60 Hz on the 120 Hz monitor. If that's the case then I see why black frame insertion isn't as ideal as strobing backlight.
Edited by ovawe - 4/20/13 at 6:48pm
post #1288 of 2231
Quote:
Originally Posted by ovawe View Post

I see. i thought about programming software that does black frame insertion throughout Windows in any game in any application. So black frame insertion at 144 Hz. It could work on linux as well.

If we do black frame insertion at 144 Hz, then the Flickr would be at 72 Hz I think So mame's black frame insertion works at 60 Hz on the 120 Hz monitor. If that's the case then I see why black frame insertion isn't as ideal as strobing backlight.
Yep, black frame insertion would allow the same motion blur of 144Hz, during 72fps operation.
It won't be able to shorten the frame sample length to less than 6.9 milliseconds (1/144sec) since it's not stroboscopically shortened shorter than that, but it would allow 72fps to have exactly the same amount of motion blur as 144fps -- meaning getting 144fps fluidity without the GPU requirements.

First, read TFT Central's Motion Blur Reduction Backlights and Blur Buster's Article About Sample-And-Hold, as well as its scientific references, to understand the relationship of eye-tracking-based motion blur being equal to the length of the time the frame is displayed for... Which means you can reduce motion blur by either more Hz, or by stroboscopically shortening each refresh (or each frame) with black periods between refreshes (or each frame). Black frame insertion is a good technique but it has limitations -- software-based black frame insertion usually only reduces motion blur by 50%, except when you combine black-frame insertion *simultaneously* with LightBoost.

That said:

60 Hz regular LCD -- baseline -- 16.7ms continuous display
120 Hz regular LCD -- has 50% less motion blur than regular 60 Hz LCD -- 8.33ms continuous display
144 Hz regular LCD -- has 60% less motion blur than regular 60 Hz LCD -- 6.9ms continuous display
120 Hz LightBoost at 100% -- has 85% less motion blur than regular 60 Hz LCD -- 2.4ms strobe length
120 Hz LightBoost at 10% -- has 92% less motion blur than regular 60 Hz LCD -- 1.4ms strobe length

For your suggestion:
144 Hz regular LCD running at 72fps (no black frames in between) -- has a 6.9ms+6.9ms = 13.8ms of continuous display (two frame repeats)
144 Hz regular LCD running at 72fps (black frames in between) -- has 6.9ms of continuous display (one refresh per frame, shortened by black frame)
So an equal black frame insertion (1:1 black frame insertion) reduces motion blur by 50%.
It won't be superior to LightBoost, but it would reduce GPU requirements.

More benefits would be for 120Hz with black frame insertion, to allow perfect 60fps LightBoost within emulators, like is already being done for MAME -- see http://www.blurbusters.com/mame. Creating a special resident software like you describe, would allow every single 60fps emulator to benefit fully (without any modifications to the emulators) -- for complete motion blur elimination while using 60fps software like emulators. 60fps software is more common than 72fps software. So I think 144Hz BFI isn't as valuable as 120Hz BFI (while LightBoost is enabled).
This is because:

120 Hz LightBoost LCD running at 60fps with black frame insertion and LB=10% equals 1.4ms frame sample length for each 60Hz frame = you get motion blur elimination benefits for 60fps emulators. A 60 frames-per-second emulator gets 92% less motion blur when you combine LightBoost *AND* black frame insertion. That's because the black frame insertion is doing the job of supressing every other strobe (blocking it with a black screen), so your eyes are only getting 60 strobes per second, getting the benefits of 60 Hz LightBoost necessary for 60fps emulators. So instead of just getting 50% blur reduction (2x less blur), you magically get the full 92% motion blur reduction! (12x less blur). That's the real magic: The combination of black frame insertion AND LightBoost. That's why software based black frame insertion is WAY MORE valuable at 120 Hz when combined simultaneously with LightBoost -- it essentially gives you 60 Hz LightBoost.. You won't be getting the same blur reduction benefits when using black frame insertion with 144 Hz.

The ratio of 16.7ms:1.4ms means a LightBoost display has a 12x shorter motion blur trail (92% less motion blur). If the motion blur was 12 pixels on the 60 Hz, the motion blur is only 1 pixel on the LightBoost 120Hz (10%) for the same speed motion.
Edited by mdrejhon - 4/20/13 at 10:59pm
post #1289 of 2231
I have a problem with my asus VG24QE: It is only showing up 60hz.
I had lightboost enabled with a gtx 670 then I sold my card and replaced it with a 7970. ever since then the monitor is registering 60hz and nothing else. I have installed the monitor driver from the asus
website, installed and unistalled the graphic drivers, plus used a registry cleaner and all the noise. What can i do?
post #1290 of 2231
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuggabob View Post

I have a problem with my asus VG24QE: It is only showing up 60hz.
I had lightboost enabled with a gtx 670 then I sold my card and replaced it with a 7970. ever since then the monitor is registering 60hz and nothing else. I have installed the monitor driver from the asus
website, installed and unistalled the graphic drivers, plus used a registry cleaner and all the noise. What can i do?
ToastyX Custom Resolution Utility. Install the lightboost.bin file. Click for instructions.

Provided you didn't unplug your monitor since you used your GeForce to unlock the monitor's LightBoost feature, it should work again.
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