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oc'ed chip longevity

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
Ok I have my e6600 @ 3.2 gHz (8 multi, 400 mHz fsb) @ 1.375 volts with load temps around 47C (dual primes). Does it SIGNIFICANTLY lower the life of the cpu to overvolt, if the temps are still kept under 55C? I have never had a chip with voltages this high, so I was just wondering.
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post #2 of 38
Thread Starter 
yea. i thought so..All in all. I am happy with the 3.2 gHz with 47C load on air....not bad...also, I have heard tat is a good measure of temps...my tat scores go around 55C full load...is that still acceptable?
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post #3 of 38
Yeah. 55C is a bit warm, I wouldn't go above it, but Intel TAT will stress your CPU more then anything else will.
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post #4 of 38
IMO. the longevity can't really be determine by voltage or temps but.....

For example, I'll never run no more than 1.45v for my C2D and right now I'm at 1.39xx and also temps, never more than 50c for full load, right now I'm at 43c for full load.

As for TAT, it will always show higher temps because the temps are from the cores not the CPU, except for Wanker which it shows the opposite.
TAT for me shows up to 54c but every single time I see the CPU at 100% load or doing any task, it doesn't get any higher than 43c.
post #5 of 38
Thread Starter 
yea core temp is showing 47C load both cores...
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post #6 of 38
Thread Starter 
nasgul, I used your ocing guide to 3.0 gHz, however I found it better to drop multi to 8and run 400 mHz fsb 1:1 with ram...
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post #7 of 38
I'd really like that too but........I like to use EIST and have my CPU running at 2.0ghz when browsing or doing anything that won't require my CPU go all the way up to the full speed of 3.0ghz.

See, when I'm using EIST, the CPU idles at 30c right now but summer time is 33c, and also because the the Vc which drops down to 1.05v. I rarely see my CPU go to the full 3.0ghz, except for the 20-30 min of NFS:MW I do some days.
post #8 of 38
Quote:
No, Intel chips are better suited for everything when compared to hacker AMD chips. I wouldn't worry about it.
what are you talking about dude, anyways ive ran my amd chips at 1.6 to 1.7 on water cooling and they are still with me after a couple years of use

most of these chips are gaurunteed for like 3 yrs and really after that youll prob be gettingsomething that totally kicks this things butt and your not much higher then stock voltage anyways, should last you a long time
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post #9 of 38
There is an advanced formula to calculate the estimated run time of a processing unit on a certain process if the electrical device specification changes outside of its designed structure.

This formula can not currently work with Core 2 Duo as the technical specification for electronics has not been released as far as I am aware, therefore there is not enough information to equate a value for approximate run time.

Intel Core 2 Duo chips are rated under design implementation to 1.35005v. This potential difference, current and resistance(s) equated, will operate for an estimated ten years. This is my estimate, and can not be calculated at this current moment in time.

Over-volting slightly to 1.375v will slightly reduce the life expectancy.
If we use mathematics here (for percentages).

1.35 > 1.375 = 1.85% increase in voltage.

Life expectancy will therefore be reduced by an estimated (~)1.85%.

Note: This value will not be accurate, due to no knowledge of technical specification of processors within the Core 2 (65nm) Core Micro-Architecture design.
post #10 of 38
One can not easily specify (on a quantitative level) exactly how long a certain chip will take out of spec voltage raises. It is luck of the draw as CPU's have a half-life measurement.

Silcon Substrates as well as the CPU/DRAM chips do not have a life such as humans and animals. It is in the physical nature of these devices that they are endowed with a half life so you can consider their span as radioactive decay for purposes of determining possible length of minimal errror use.

For example:

Given:

100,000 New CPU's from the same Stepping Fab. Their half life is the time that would pass before 50,000 of them fail. So, based on how long people have working CPU's, the half life of your CPU could easily be 10 or more years.

This is considering that you stay within the thermals and electrostatic limits of the manufacturer. If you do so, then the CPU will remain long after its usefulness is ended. Since you are not doing so when raising the core voltages the half-life would have to be extended to raising the sample set all at the same voltage level and then setting maximal use conditions whilst awaiting CPU lifecycle ending.

Yes, The_Manual can give a possible estimated time frame, and very well be closer than a simple "Guess" but still, there is no hard and fast rule that will specify such an unknown variable as a single chip life on voltage raises.

R
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