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Can you run 2400mhz ram in Crosshair V Formula-Z stock? - Page 3

post #21 of 25
I am looking at upgrading my memory because of a new build. kinda interested in increasing capacity to 16 gb total. currently running ancient Kingston hyper x 2133 MHz 2 x 4 gb... after alittle tweaking was able to reach the 2133 MHz in an asrock extreme 3 990fx with bulldozer 8150. just upgraded to asus crosshair v formula z, amd 9370 and xfx pro single rail 750 watt psu. would like some info on a quad channel setup of 2400 MHz 4 x 4 gb ddr3...... currently looking at gskill trident x or mushkin enhanced redline. as im quite confident of reaching 2400 MHz my question is, would a quad channel kit have any benefit such as 4 x 4 gb or should I just run 2 x 8 gb dual channel configuration? from the old lanparty days it was not recommended to fill all the ddr slots. from looking on newegg some team extreme memory 2666 MHz 2 x 8 gb would be cheaper than gskill @ 2400 mhz...... again what would be drawback compared to gain of attempting a quad channel setup with the 9370? im aware quad channel is supported for intel cpu only. also nb frequency needs to match or be greater than memory frequency....
post #22 of 25
Ok. According to the CVFZ specs, 2400Mhz mem is native for the board. You need not get a set of 2133, and overclock it to 2400. I build my CVFZ with 32Gb G.Skill Trident X 2400 mem, and haven't had any problems. I don't bother with the FSB anymore though. I use strictly the multiplier, so that my memory can be set to SPD's, and remain solid. One problem with the G.Skill Trident X, is that the voltage has to be set really high, as it was designed to conform to Intel use, but if you look in your bios far right where the listings for SPD's are, you'll see that the Trident X can run 10/12/12/31/43/2, or 1T.

With 32 Gb, I was stable with 2T. However, using that much mem kept me from getting a stable 4.8Ghz OC, so I backed down one set (2x8Gb sticks) of my mem. Now, I'm more stable, have been able to lower CPU core voltage, as well as everything but the VDDR, which will have to be set high, depending on your NB/HT settings in the beginning of the list of tweaks. I use 2400/2600, and have to keep the VDDR two full steps from standard/default. I also still have to keep the mem voltage kicked up pretty high in order to it to show 1.65v, which is the memory standard/default voltage when used at it's Intel SPD's in an AMD machine.

When I say "kicked up" to maintain 1.65v on the mem, I mean I have to set it to 1.68-1.70. You have to remember that no two motherboards, just as processors, PSU's, NB Chips, SB Chips, etc, are never the same, so your's may differ from mine, and allow you too keep your mem v down. This mem is designed to take a severe beating though, so going up to 1.68-1.70v isn't going to damage it unless you have your timings wrong, or over heat it in the case while in use and if that's the case, you'll probably set off a chain reaction that takes out a lot more than just the memory, as the memory buss's are "directly" piped to the CPU.

Bottom line is this. The G.Skill Trident X is listed in the "acceptable" memory, but just because it mentions "OCing it, doesn't mean you have to buy slower mem, and clock it up to 2400Mhz. 2400Mhz is simply what the boards "safe" memory speed level, but I can tell you right now, there are others who are running 2600Mhz, and it's being read correctly by the new 2201 bios. On my Sabertooth machine, it was rated at 1866-2133, but I had 8Gb's (dual kit of 2x4Gb) G.Skill mem in it, and it not only had no difficulties running it at the advertised speed, it actually made the machine feel smoother, and more responsive when loading heaving progs, or benchmarks.

I know my word will be doubted by some, but if you head over to the ASUS ROG Forums, go to the RealBench listings, I'm ranked about #45 on the 60,000+ benchmark scores. That's using my FX8350 @ 4.5Ghz, and the full 32Gb's of mem I mentioned I originally put in it. It was over kill though. 16Gb's is almost perfect from what I can tell, and if you just want to get super high OC's with this board, and that chip, a single 8Gb stick will get you to 5.2-5.3Ghz "stable", but it comes at a price. The vcore has to be set to 1.5 and above, which is "RED LINE" and is severely pushing the limits of your 8350 CPU. I've OC'd for a lot of years, and I won't do it. I'd rather get a decent 4.6-4.8Ghz clock out of mine, and have it running smoothly with my twin R9 270X (Dual-X) Sapphire 4Gb DDR5 mem in crossfirex.

I also run a 1000w/38amp x 4 rails Raidmax PSU Gold edition, so after installing twin Crucial 128Gb SSD's, a WD SATA6, 128mb cache (industrial grade) 1Tb storage drive, twin Asus Blu-Ray burners, the twin Sapphires 270X's, and 10 decent fans in my Cooler Master HAF Advanced full tower case, I still have a little headroom on the PSU so as never to stress it to it's limits. Raidmax doesn't always get the best rating/rep either, but I suspect those PSU's are being put in machines that need more amperage, and wattage, and it doesn't take long to fry one, and possibly everything else on the board at the same time. I bought two of The RAIDMAX Vampire RX-1000GH Continuous 1000 watts ATX12V / EPS12V SLI CrossFire 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular PFC Power Supply Intel Haswell Platform Ready.

I bout them because I Knew these machines were getting the "maxed out" treatment already, and my next builds will most likely be Intel. I want the dust to settle with the new tech before I step into a pile of really expensive poop++.....LOL!!! These Raidmax PSU's were one sale, had more power than I needed, and haven't had a moments problem out of either one in over 3 years since I bought my first. That rig was sold to a gamer client, and is still using the same hardware, but due for a graph upgrade.

Everything has it's breaking point, and I suspect some folks just tried to push the Raidmax PSU units, mostly in the 750-850w category, too hard, buy running 5 drives, 15 fans, water cooling (which I forgot to mention I use the Corsair H100i modded to push/pull w/4 fans rather than the two that it comes with stock...I don't see temps over 56C while running the CPU wide open for several hours with Prime, and Realbench, which is super intense on your rig as it is), twin G/cards in SLI, or CrossfireX, and never think about the "amperage" it takes to feed these new, powerful monster cards, and other power hungry components, such as Blu-Ray burners, being used to modify a Blu-Ray to an M4V, or MP4 format, which believe it or not, takes a tremendous amount of power to do.

Depending on the conversion software used, something like DIVX tools will spike your CPU to 100% and hold it there until a chapter change, and then it's right back to 100% until it's done with the next. A simple program like "Any Video Convertor" will use every bit of your multimedia power to convert, compress, and change native 5.1 sound to 2.0 in most cases.

Well, I've tried to give you first hand "owner" info, so the rest is up to you. Your G.Skill 2400 is listed as the highest rated mem in the specs PDF, but I suspect one could easily clock even it up to close to 2500, or even hit 2600Mhz if they get good hardware (luck of the draw as a rule of thumb, or you just happen to be lucky enough to get beta chips that are tested to limits far beyond the 5Ghz mark, and sent to those you see in the RealBench video, where they break the 8Ghz barrier with the 8350, and set the world record on a CVFZ board.

If you have any problems with it, you can PM me, or email me, and I'll do my best to help walk you through to the 4.8Ghz mark with stability. You picked the second best mem to put in the machine, so I give you a two thumbs up for that alone. My last three kits of G.Skill meant business. They dished it out, and came back for more when I needed them to. The only mem I would say topped it, would be Corsair, but it'd be a tight race none the less. Corsair doesn't have the voltage issues the G.Skill can pose for getting a good OC, but I think that's about as far as it goes between the two.

I'm currently running my 2x8=16Gb G.Skill kit at 2400Mhz, with timings of 10/12/12/31/43/1T. Brother, that, makes this little AMD rig hump, and never break a sweat. Hope that this book I wrote on it (LMBO) has info you can use, and you get things straightened out on definitions of labels placed on memory sticks that don't mean it has to be overclocked to run that speed, it means that it runs that speed natively, and "can" be OC's even higher, as it's quality memory.


And hope you get it running like it should with no problems. Leave the FSB alone, and use the multiplier, and your mem remains stable, so if it crashes, you know you don't have to look at the memory as a potential cause. It will most likely be a low vcore on your CPU, or temps over 60C on the CPU, which after a while, will most likely cause a crash. My machine is a bit noisy with all the fans I have, but I look at it this way....you wanna play, you gotta pay. Sure, there are ways to cut back on DB levels from fans, which is something else I can tell you about, and how to chose the right fans for your case, that won't sound like jet's, but will push more air than you'd think they would. No matter the RPM, it's the CFM that counts, and how much static air pressure the fans are capable of, in order to pushd, or through a water cooling system to a simple front case fan, that will put out enough to keep those drives cool so you don't have data corruption from getting a spool drive too hot.

Peace bro! Hope this helps in some small way.
post #23 of 25
When i had my 8320 on a sabertooth rev 1.0 my gskill stick ( 2133 mhz ) run just fine all day long with a moderate oc on the cpu 4.5 ghz i think youll be fine with 2400 ram on the CFVZ.
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crucial ssd 128 Go Samsung 840 evo 250 Go Hitachi HDD 1To Toshiba HDD 2To 
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CM Quick Fire Pro CM V1000 CM Trooper modded CM Havoc 
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Number 3
(16 items)
 
Dust Catcher
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 6700k 4.5 ghz MSI Gaming M7  Palit 1080 GameRock PE 2x8 go Gskill 3200mhz C15 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
crucial ssd 128 Go Samsung 840 evo 250 Go Hitachi HDD 1To Toshiba HDD 2To 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Old DVD-RW KRAKEN X61 Windows 10 x64 Acer 27" 144hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
CM Quick Fire Pro CM V1000 CM Trooper modded CM Havoc 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom ii x6 1075t Asus Sabertooth 990fx CF 2x Asus 6950 directcu ii  2x4Gb Gskill 1333 
Hard DriveCoolingOSPower
80go Intel x25 ssd series + 500 go Samsung  cooler master V6 gt Win 7 64bit ultimate edition cooler master silent pro 850w 
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HAF 912 advanced 
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post #24 of 25
I ran the same G.Skill 2400 Trident X on my Sabertooth 990FX rev1, even though it wasn't rated for it. It recognized it, let em set the SPD's and had "0" problems with it over a 5 month period of time. I might add that I think it confused my Windows 7 Ultra 64bit OS Performance tests up, as it was running 7.5 prior to the G.Skill, but no sooner than I got it set up, 7.9.
post #25 of 25
Frozenprocessor, when you upgraded to the CVFZ motherboard, you didn't get a change from dual channel memory, to quad channel. The CVFZ motherboard, is a "dual channel" board, no matter how many sticks of quad channel memory you put in it, so you'd be wasting your money getting a quad kit for that mobo. Initially, it's the CPU that has the capability of running quad mem, but unless the board supports such chips, it's still locked down to dual channel only. Also, the fewer sticks of memory, the better. I started out using two sets of G.Skill Trident X 2400Mhz mem, using two kits of 2x8Gb. I could reach 4.8Mhz, but still had some stability problems no matter what I tweaked in the bios. So, I dropped back to 16Gb (2x8Gb kit), and things are a lot smoother, and more stable. As time goes by, even though I won't keep it there because of it being the point at which you decay the life of your CPU for short lived bragging rights in most cases, I'll test the 5Ghz mark, and do so by using different variables/means of obtaining that 5Ghz speed as I have so far. In short, I'll be tampering with memory timings, and clocks trying to find the "sweat spot" between memory, CPU, the voltages for each, as well as the memory clock timings. Sound like a lot of work to get a wicked, mean overclock? Well, it is, but there are enthusiasts (such as I once was) who will squeeze every last drop of power, and stability out of their systems for the ultimate benchmark, and/or gaming experience.

The first overclock I did was with a 66Mhz Intel using motherboard jumpers to get it to run @ 99Mhz. Nowhere near the controls we have now though the bios, and in many cases, ended up frying the CPU in a short time, depending on how good "that" particular run of silicon chip was. CPU's are like fingerprints. No two are the same....ever.
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