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Wanting to switch from manual to offset overclocking

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 
System:

Core i5 3570k OC'd to 4.4GHz @ 1.185 volts manual (seems to stick at 1.192V actual... is this due to spread spectrum?)
ASUS P8Z770V Pro with latest BIOS (rev. 1708)
4 x 4 GB Samsung DDR3 RAM
two Geforce 670 GTX in 2-way SLI
Seasonic Platinum 880watt
Samsung 830 Pro 256GB SSD (OS/apps)
1 TB WD Black (storage)
Windows 8 64-bit

What I want to do:

I have my computer running stable at the current voltage (though I may push to lower it a little more over the holiday) using the manual settings, but I'd really like to figure out offset overclocking. The guides I've read haven't been very helpful, since none of them seem to explain why the voltage fluctuates so damn much from one boot to the next when in offset mode, nor where/how to set the max voltage threshold in my UEFI. Yes, I've read some of the offset overclocking guides in this forum.

I would like to keep all the power saving features enabled, but just up the max voltage threshold in order to support my OC. I've done extensive reading that indicates keeping the C-states enabled is actually a good idea on OCing the newer chips, though I'm still a little fuzzy on spread spectrum's practical application.

I could really use some input here on how to force a max voltage threshold (so it won't do that crazy-ass 1.3xx voltage level that the ASUS board likes to do).
post #2 of 2

Usually, the reason for the actual voltage being higher than what you have it set in the BIOS is due to using too high of a Load-Line Calibration setting.  Another result of using too high of a Load-Line Calibration setting is higher VRM temperatures.  A VRM that's too hot can sometimes cause a little bit of instability.  If you lower the LLC level, then remember to increase the core voltage setting in the BIOS so that your actual voltage for full-load doesn't change.  I mean, you'll have to experiment, but it can be worth the work.

 

Spread Spectrum, as I understand it, doesn't affect what the voltage is.  However, I recommend disabling it because it makes the BCLK go down to about 99.8 MHz instead of 100 MHz.  A note to other people:  this does not apply to the P67 chipset.

 

I think that setting the offset voltage can be easy if you set your LLC level to a place where your full-load voltage is the same as your idle voltage.  If it droops down a tiny bit at a certain LLC level but then you get vRise instead of vDroop at the next highest LLC level, then use the lower LLC level where you get the tiny amount of vDroop.  You see, the offset to use is the difference between the VID and your idle voltage (while using a manual voltage).  To see your VID, open Core Temp and start Prime95 in order to put full load on the CPU.  Take that number and find the difference between what you got and your idle voltage as displayed by CPU-Z.

 

Your board has voltage increments of 0.005V.  So, if your idle voltage is 1.192V, then you find the exact difference between it and your VID and round it up or down in order to be compatible with the 0.005V increment.  Also, if your idle voltage is lower than your VID, then use the negative offset sign.  If your idle voltage is higher than your VID, then use the positive offset sign.  This is because the offset is either subtracting to, or adding to the VID.

 

Also note that each multiplier has its own VID.  ;)

 

I think that's the best I can do.

It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
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