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post #41 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeVo View Post

Glad to hear your father got a new job!

Can't wait to see this completed.


+1


Darlene
post #42 of 112
Great news! Can't wait! biggrin.gif
post #43 of 112
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post #44 of 112
Thread Starter 

The effects of TIM and performance

Dennis Chen, 1/28/2013

Abstract

As the personal computing platform begins to die off, much of the attention has been turned towards cloud based computing and heavy usage of super computers, massive servers, and high-end mainframes.  If thermal pastes of different varieties were tested on a Prescott P68 silicon die, one would find that the metal compound would help encourage more performance for a silicon die at similar operating temperatures because it is well known to produce the lowest temperatures, which leaves more headroom for increased performance.  The experiment tests different thermal solutions for a processor, and recording the speed, performance, and reliability of the processor.  For this experiment, syringes of thermal compound were used: diamond powder, ceramic solution, silicon solution, and a pure metal compound.  The main relationship in the data was that the ceramic paste did best with a 10% increase in performance compared to the lowest one.  However, the efficiency of the other samples is hard to judge.  Originally, it was thought that this lower temperature would create more headroom for better performance and productivity, contradicted by the fact that it placed significantly lower than ceramic in actual performance.  Because of this test, there remains the question of silicon degrading, and whether that affects temperature.

Introductions

                From the nature of the imprecision of modern day manufacturing tools, the integrated heat sink on microprocessors and the surface of the source of heat transfer, an insulating layer of air resists proper thermal flow from a processor’s integrated heat sink to its heat sink assembly (TPU).  See Figure 1.  In response to this event, the performance of a processor is drastically reduced due to thermal throttling of the silicon die.  Since the development and investigation of thermal interface material, there has been an increase in demand causing well-known high-tech corporations such as Shin-Etsu to develop new materials for increased thermal performance (Shultz).  Since the introduction of thermal interface material, the semiconductor industry was able to reduce the transistor size to near atomic levels, and shrink die sizes to unimaginable dimensions, while keeping within similar thermal dissipation points and increasing performance.  The purpose of this experiment is to discover if there is a relationship between the thermal material used, and the performance loss or gain because of the material.  This experiment finds base on the conclusions of the Schulz, Allen, and Pohl experiment of thermal interface material factors.  They concluded that to any conventional thermal interface material is well developed and can be used in almost all cases to disperse heat efficiently to a heat sink assembly.  Through various other sources such as technology magazines, online forums, and professional laboratories, it has almost become common knowledge that generally, the lower the operating temperature of the transistors, the better it performs in applications and has better reliability than its warmer counterparts have.

                As the personal computing platform begins to die off, much of the attention has been turned towards cloud based computing and heavy usage of super computers, massive servers, and high-end mainframes.  As every fraction of a gigaflop counts per processor in those scenarios, it is important for those companies and owners of those mainframes to make the most of their money.  For example, an Intel® Xeon E5™, which produces about 150 gigaflops, is common found in applications where they demand up to teraflops of performance, requiring the usage of hundreds or thousands of similar processors.  If the output of every processor is reduced by 10%, then the performance of the computer takes a huge hit.  It is important to accelerate the power of those computers to provide answers to the world and continue to help humanity, like Stanford University’s protein folding project, that many schools participate in, and the Human Genome project that was finished a few years back.

                If thermal pastes of different varieties were tested on a silicon die, one would find that the metal compound would help encourage more performance for a silicon die at similar operating temperatures because it is well known to produce the lowest temperatures, which leaves more headroom for increased performance.

Materials and Methods

                The experiment tests different thermal solutions for a processor, and recording the speed, performance, and reliability of the processor.  For this experiment, syringes of thermal compound were used: diamond powder, ceramic solution, silicone solution, and a pure metal compound.  The testing bench itself was from a Hewlett-Packard DC5000 SFF.  The mainboard was removed from the chassis and placed on a custom-built acrylic testing bench.  The power supply was upgraded from a 185 watt to a 520 watt Dynex with a maximum output of 430 watts.  In addition, the processor was replaced with a new and freshly etched, Pentium 4 2.8 GHz/533 MHz FSB (Prescott, mPGA478, 90nm manufacturing lithography, stepping 3, revision C0).  The memory was replaced with a new lower latency 2GB dual-channel Kingston.

This setup was chosen because it closely replicates the server environment, open air testing resembles the high airflow in a rack-mount server system, and the Prescott architecture is well known to be the hottest chip on the market, having a temperature output of over 30 watts above TDP at stock speeds.  In addition, in the area of Net burst (P68), high clock speeds resulted in exponentially rising temperatures (Cpu-World).  Since the temperature was a major issue with the architecture, Intel deployed some of its first forms of thermal throttling in processors to maintain thermal regulation over the chip in order to reduce failure or instability (ark.intel).  The experiment is designed to take advantage of this feature, as throttling manages to keep the core temperature at 55°C constant throttle and auto-shut down protection at 67.7°C with a power draw of 84 Watts.

                In preparation, the IHS was cleaned in rubbing alcohol and left to dry.  A 140mm fan was added to the cool the lower PCB and a 40mm fan to cool the MOSFET and VRM of the upper PCB.  The MOS was cleared, flashed to 768B0 version 1.43, and a clean install of Windows 7 Ultimate (32 bit) was performed.  Intel integrated graphics drivers were installed and the rest of the core chipset and controller drivers were located and installed.  Linpack software in the form of IBT, and monitoring software/hardware portables were mounted on a flash drive.  Before each session, the ambient temperatures were controlled until the average ambient was 20°C.

Four unique thermal materials were used, aluminum based material, ceramic based material, diamond powder, and silicone based material.  All of these materials consist of pure substance in powdered form with a particle size close to 1.5 × 10-6 mm and pure alcohol in roughly a 300-ppm ratio.

The experiment was done in cycles, with every cycle consisting of the following process for all of the materials in the order: diamond, silicon, ceramic, and aluminum.  The material was applied using the dot method on the IHS.  A total of .5mL of compound was place in the center.  The computer was turned on, left on Windows aero, and idled for 45 minutes.  Then, IBT (2.54 agent God) was used as stress testing.  IBT was run for a full 10 round test of 1024 MB stress.  The Linpack results were also taken, recorded, and logged.  The computer was given another 15 minutes of idling.  After, HyperPI (0.99b) was run and did a 32k digit calculation of pi.  The maximum and the minimum CPU temperatures were recorded.  The computer was then shut down.  The heat sink assembly was disassembled; the processor was removed, and let to cool down for a period of 15 minutes.  Upon finishing, the next material was applied.  At the completion of one cycle, the computer and test bench was dismantled until the next cycle.

Results

Throughout the entire experiment, the data received from the testing was generally consistent and reproducible within each cycle.  There were only a few exceptions to this being aluminum, and an inconsistency in cycle 3 for diamond and silicon paste. 

Results from testing from Chart 1 show that the ceramic thermal compound produced the highest average performance with over .3 gigaflops of performance compared to the lowest item on the list.  The worst average performing compound was silicon paste with poor performance in all three tests and a surprising failure, which resulted in an incomplete testing run of HyperPI.  However, figure one also shows that realistic performance is relatively large, close to 10%.  Looking at Chart 2, HyperPI average results though, ceramic marginally performs better than diamond, with a gap within the ± 5% error generally given for logging.  Because of the lack of a test of silicon paste in Trial 2, the actual average may be slightly skewed in performance aspects. 

Some major similarities existed in the data.  For all samples, they performed significantly faster than expected, keeping average completion numbers under 300 seconds as seen in Chart 3.  From Chart 4, there seems to be a reoccurring pattern somewhat resembling a sine wave in all the test samples which guarantees thermal throttling in action, due to the fact that as performance increases, thermals increase to, leaving a cyclic pattern.  In the third cycle, silicon and diamond did ridiculously poorly with scores above the 250 range. 

The main relationship in the data was that the ceramic paste did best without exception to produce output numbers in the lowest amount of time.  However, the efficiency of the other samples is hard to judge.  One notable observation is the instability of the aluminum compound.  The scores for aluminum, as shown in all tests, are extremely volatile, and do not necessarily represent reliable information.  Finally, it is evident that it is very hard to predict future trends in all substances except ceramic and diamond compounds.

Conclusion

From the results of the experiment, evidence shows that the most productive thermal interface material, when testing for performance at identical temperatures is ceramic paste.  This seems hard to explain because studies show that metal paste offers some of the lowest temperatures compared to other thermal materials.  Originally, it was thought that this lower temperature would create more headroom for better performance and productivity.  This was contradicted by the fact that it placed significantly lower than ceramic in actual performance.  Ceramic is well known as an extremely cheap and mediocre thermal material in terms of thermal performance.  However, as the experiment shows, thermal performance does not equate to performance of the silicon die.  Metal paste will outperform silicon and ceramic pastes by 21°C, which implies more headroom.  Theoretically, this should result in the ability to “operate” at 21°C above the throttle point (TPU).  This may explain the unsteady results from the experiment.  It is acknowledged that one major flaw, which does not realistically affect the results, is the fact that silicon degrades.  Because of silicon degrading, the performance of the processor is losing performance as it is used overtime.  Since the silicon used was new, this problem may have been diminished.  However, such a problem should still be addressed as it may be more important than it appears. 

This experiment demonstrates that that overall performance still depends on how thermal material is applied, and changing a thermal material may benefit the performance of the silicon.  A future question that resulted from this experiment is the effect of silicone degrading in relation to thermal material. 

References and Further Readings

David Dalleau, Indrajit Paul, and Frank Broermann First principle optimization of power module baseplate PCIM 2011 Nuremberg, Germany in May 201

Ijeoma M. Nebe and Claudius Feger Drainage-Induced Dry-Out of Thermal Grease IEEE Transaction on advanced packaging, VOL31, No3, August 2008

Intel, Intel Core i7, Product Specifications see also http://ark.intel.com

Infineon Technologies, Datasheet of the FZ1500R33HE3, 2010 see also www.infineon.com

Karsten Guth et al.  New assembly and interconnects beyond sintering methods PCIM 2010 Nuremberg, Germany in May 2010

R. Ott et al.  New superior assembly technologies for modules with highest power densities, PCIM, Nuremberg, May 2010

P. Karayacoubian et al. Asymptotic Solutions of Effective Thermal Conductivity, IMECE2005, Orlando, USA

Schulz, Martin.  The Challenging Task of Thermal Measurement, PCIM, Nuremberg, May 2011

Schulz, Martin, Scott T. Allen, and Wilhelm Pohl.  "Optimizing Thermal Interface Material for the Specific Needs of Power Electronics.”  (2011). Document.

"Thermal Paste and How to Use It.”  TechPowerUp.  N.P., 8 Jan. 2006.   

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post #45 of 112
Thread Starter 

.pdf since excel charts don't show up...

 

 

 

 

Science Fair Paper.pdf 673k .pdf file

 

Just incase you wanted to know.

 

 

Updates on ARC will be slightly delayed, I have a lot of paperwork to fill out for Northrup Grumman and Science Fair.

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post #46 of 112
You did your science fair project on thermal paste? That is just awesome. I wish I had thought of that when i was still in grade school.
post #47 of 112
I wish I had been this resourceful when I was 12. When I was that age I just upgraded my machine and stopped there frown.gif

keep it up kid! Subbed thumb.gif

Edit: Would you mind uploading some of those sketches, we could then offer some feedback!
post #48 of 112
A++ for you! thumb.gif
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post #49 of 112
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tensiga View Post

You did your science fair project on thermal paste? That is just awesome. I wish I had thought of that when i was still in grade school.

Well, when you get into tech...
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiamondCut View Post

I wish I had been this resourceful when I was 12. When I was that age I just upgraded my machine and stopped there frown.gif

keep it up kid! Subbed thumb.gif

Edit: Would you mind uploading some of those sketches, we could then offer some feedback!

I promise I will. Within 6 hours. Btw, I built my first comp at 5 years pentium 4 2.8 ghz. Same one in use in the science fair paper.
Quote:
Originally Posted by f0rteOC View Post

A++ for you! thumb.gif

I actually just turned the paper in yesterday. Other people are getting some low scores.... But thanks for your concern. I appreciate it
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post #50 of 112
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KillThePancake View Post

Great news! Can't wait! biggrin.gif

Didn't see your post at first, but thanks for supporting!
Quote:
Originally Posted by IT Diva View Post

+1


Darlene

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeVo View Post

Glad to hear your father got a new job!

Can't wait to see this completed.

Sorry for failing to see those posts.

My dad said thank you.
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