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AMD Bulldozer and Piledriver Overclocking Guide - Asus Motherboard - Page 70

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417 Total Votes  
post #691 of 4095
Quote:
Originally Posted by amd-pcmarlow View Post

Theres also direct bios on the disc that came with it, a desktop icon so you dont have to hardwire the reset button lol also with you populating all 4 ram slots you are adding strain to the imc so using stock 1.5v and stick timings for your ram you will see a core or two fail in prime95 and anything above 16gb is hardly ever going to be used in everyday use or gaming, unless you have a reason for using 32gb ram?

@amd-pcmarlow:

Thanks! I didn't know about the utility that adds a direct-reboot-to-BIOS Icon. That sounds quite nice. But, wiring it to a physical button has other benefits. Namely, I don't typically run Windows. In fact, the only time I'm on it (with this machine) is for initial-build stability testing. Linux doesn't always have drivers for the newest sensors, so while I can run Prime95, it can be impossible to monitor voltages & temps at the same time. So, as much as it pains me to say, it's just easier to do it in Windows.

So, when I'm booting my custom Linux box, it's a bit of a bother to hit DEL/F8. It's nice to do a "shutdown -h now" at the command line, and then press the Reset button (which is to say, there aren't Linux drivers for the ASUS mobo).

I do realize that having 4 sticks works the system harder than 2 or 1. The question for me was which knobs need to be turned. What was interesting to me was that turning DRAM Voltage DOWN was the key, not up. Maybe that's old news to a lot of folks, but it seemed like there was only one post (by DeusXXX) which discussed how to work with more than 1 or 2 sticks, so it seemed like my data would be helpful (since, as you pointed out, a lot of folks probably don't run with more than 16 GB for everyday use).

And, the reason I cared in the first place is because my use is probably not what most would consider "everyday". I write software, and I have source code compilations that used to take more than 15 hours at a time. Having a faster dev box makes a lot of difference. I mount entire filesystems with gigabytes of source code into RAM, to remove slow disk I/Os from the equation. And, every once in a while, I work with some large datasets that are faster to load into memory. Large production systems have anywhere from 32 GB to 512 GB of RAM; this is just a small dev machine to do some basic tests on.

Having said that, fundamentally, this is more of a learning exercise for me. I don't OC my production machines, and I do my (light) gaming at stock (and use 8-year-old graphics cards). The most significant part of this for me, since it's my first OC, is to learn new things, for which this thread has been a wonderful resource. I'm happy just contributing a data point or two!

@ComputerRestore:

I'm now curious about turning up CPU/NB voltage, although the main question would be: "Why?" If the system is stable, would having new data about CPU/NB be interesting from the POV of trying to push the RAM (either through freq or timings)?

I'm also curious to see if it will even out Vcore during Blend--not that I even know if the swings are problematic to begin with. I'm beginning to wonder if the droops and spikes come from when Prime95 switches tests (for me, that defaults to every 15 minutes); presumably, it loads new data into memory, which is reducing FPU use (and probably changes electrical load/thermals). Could Vcore swings during Blend be...natural?
post #692 of 4095
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qrux View Post

@ComputerRestore:

I'm now curious about turning up CPU/NB voltage, although the main question would be: "Why?" If the system is stable, would having new data about CPU/NB be interesting from the POV of trying to push the RAM (either through freq or timings)?

I'm also curious to see if it will even out Vcore during Blend--not that I even know if the swings are problematic to begin with. I'm beginning to wonder if the droops and spikes come from when Prime95 switches tests (for me, that defaults to every 15 minutes); presumably, it loads new data into memory, which is reducing FPU use (and probably changes electrical load/thermals). Could Vcore swings during Blend be...natural?

For the CPU/NB it would be interesting from the point of both tighter timings and/or higher frequency the points being:
**How much CPU/NB voltage would it take
- to run your ram at the rated 1.5v
- to tighten the timings
- to increase your Ram frequency

***How much would this increase CPU thermals.

Unless you are intested in running your ram tighter or higher, I wouldn't worry about it though, seeing as you needed 9+ hours to see that even 1.5v had issues with stability. That's way too much time IMO to spend for a minor increase.

As for your voltage swings. It does sound like it's during the point of switching data sets. Something else about Prime95 is that it will stagger the cores to improve effeciency, so depending on how the cores are staggered you may see multiple swings during a short period before it evens out again. As long as it doesn't look like the heart beat of an extreme athlete then you're fine.
post #693 of 4095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qrux View Post

@amd-pcmarlow:

Thanks! I didn't know about the utility that adds a direct-reboot-to-BIOS Icon. That sounds quite nice. But, wiring it to a physical button has other benefits. Namely, I don't typically run Windows. In fact, the only time I'm on it (with this machine) is for initial-build stability testing. Linux doesn't always have drivers for the newest sensors, so while I can run Prime95, it can be impossible to monitor voltages & temps at the same time. So, as much as it pains me to say, it's just easier to do it in Windows.

So, when I'm booting my custom Linux box, it's a bit of a bother to hit DEL/F8. It's nice to do a "shutdown -h now" at the command line, and then press the Reset button (which is to say, there aren't Linux drivers for the ASUS mobo).

I do realize that having 4 sticks works the system harder than 2 or 1. The question for me was which knobs need to be turned. What was interesting to me was that turning DRAM Voltage DOWN was the key, not up. Maybe that's old news to a lot of folks, but it seemed like there was only one post (by DeusXXX) which discussed how to work with more than 1 or 2 sticks, so it seemed like my data would be helpful (since, as you pointed out, a lot of folks probably don't run with more than 16 GB for everyday use).

And, the reason I cared in the first place is because my use is probably not what most would consider "everyday". I write software, and I have source code compilations that used to take more than 15 hours at a time. Having a faster dev box makes a lot of difference. I mount entire filesystems with gigabytes of source code into RAM, to remove slow disk I/Os from the equation. And, every once in a while, I work with some large datasets that are faster to load into memory. Large production systems have anywhere from 32 GB to 512 GB of RAM; this is just a small dev machine to do some basic tests on.

Having said that, fundamentally, this is more of a learning exercise for me. I don't OC my production machines, and I do my (light) gaming at stock (and use 8-year-old graphics cards). The most significant part of this for me, since it's my first OC, is to learn new things, for which this thread has been a wonderful resource. I'm happy just contributing a data point or two!

@ComputerRestore:

I'm now curious about turning up CPU/NB voltage, although the main question would be: "Why?" If the system is stable, would having new data about CPU/NB be interesting from the POV of trying to push the RAM (either through freq or timings)?

I'm also curious to see if it will even out Vcore during Blend--not that I even know if the swings are problematic to begin with. I'm beginning to wonder if the droops and spikes come from when Prime95 switches tests (for me, that defaults to every 15 minutes); presumably, it loads new data into memory, which is reducing FPU use (and probably changes electrical load/thermals). Could Vcore swings during Blend be...natural?

Well that cleared the ram up, nice one :-)
post #694 of 4095
The only reason I just joined overclock.net was to vote yes on your poll. Really good overclock guide, planning to buy a FX-63XX and I feel this will help immensely. Thank you.
post #695 of 4095
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saucyracer View Post

The only reason I just joined overclock.net was to vote yes on your poll. Really good overclock guide, planning to buy a FX-63XX and I feel this will help immensely. Thank you.

Wow, thanks. These are great processors and I'm sure you'll be happy with one. If you have any questions before you make your purchase the FX-83XX Owners Club is a great resource. That way you end up with hardware suited to your overclocking expectations.
post #696 of 4095
I had a quick question over the guide temperatures listed. Can't remember if it had been asked already. I've been hearing more and more talk about measuring Delta temps, as opposed to just Load temps.

My question is, the temperatures listed in your guide, are those to be Load temps? or Delta temps?

For anybody that doesn't know, Delta temp is your Ambient temp subtracted from your Load temp. And although I'm not entirely read up on the significance of knowing this Delta temp, my guess is that it is the actual (or more accurate, maybe?) reading of the CPU temperature?
Destrto3
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD FX-8120 M5A99FX PRO R2.0 Radeon R9 270X Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 ... 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 ... SanDisk Extreme 240 Western Digital WDC WD10 EARS 1TB Seagate ST2000DM 2TB 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
TSSTcorp CDDVDW SH-222BB EK Supreme LTx (AMD) Windows 8.1 Sceptre 32" LCD Flat Panel TV 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Cooler Master Devastator ThermalTake TR2 RX 850W Corsair Obsidian 750D Cooler Master Devastator 
Audio
OnBoard 
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Destrto3
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD FX-8120 M5A99FX PRO R2.0 Radeon R9 270X Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 ... 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 ... SanDisk Extreme 240 Western Digital WDC WD10 EARS 1TB Seagate ST2000DM 2TB 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
TSSTcorp CDDVDW SH-222BB EK Supreme LTx (AMD) Windows 8.1 Sceptre 32" LCD Flat Panel TV 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Cooler Master Devastator ThermalTake TR2 RX 850W Corsair Obsidian 750D Cooler Master Devastator 
Audio
OnBoard 
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post #697 of 4095
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destrto View Post

I had a quick question over the guide temperatures listed. Can't remember if it had been asked already. I've been hearing more and more talk about measuring Delta temps, as opposed to just Load temps.

My question is, the temperatures listed in your guide, are those to be Load temps? or Delta temps?

For anybody that doesn't know, Delta temp is your Ambient temp subtracted from your Load temp. And although I'm not entirely read up on the significance of knowing this Delta temp, my guess is that it is the actual (or more accurate, maybe?) reading of the CPU temperature?

The temps for these are pretty much just what is shown.

Package/Core is only accurate under load or near 62C

The Socket Temp is pretty accurate all the time.
post #698 of 4095
Quote:
Originally Posted by ComputerRestore View Post

The temps for these are pretty much just what is shown.

Package/Core is only accurate under load or near 62C

The Socket Temp is pretty accurate all the time.

OK, just wanted to make sure. A lot of places i've been reading are talking more and more about Delta temps lately, so it made me curious.
Destrto3
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD FX-8120 M5A99FX PRO R2.0 Radeon R9 270X Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 ... 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 ... SanDisk Extreme 240 Western Digital WDC WD10 EARS 1TB Seagate ST2000DM 2TB 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
TSSTcorp CDDVDW SH-222BB EK Supreme LTx (AMD) Windows 8.1 Sceptre 32" LCD Flat Panel TV 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Cooler Master Devastator ThermalTake TR2 RX 850W Corsair Obsidian 750D Cooler Master Devastator 
Audio
OnBoard 
  hide details  
Reply
Destrto3
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD FX-8120 M5A99FX PRO R2.0 Radeon R9 270X Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 ... 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 ... SanDisk Extreme 240 Western Digital WDC WD10 EARS 1TB Seagate ST2000DM 2TB 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
TSSTcorp CDDVDW SH-222BB EK Supreme LTx (AMD) Windows 8.1 Sceptre 32" LCD Flat Panel TV 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Cooler Master Devastator ThermalTake TR2 RX 850W Corsair Obsidian 750D Cooler Master Devastator 
Audio
OnBoard 
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Reply
post #699 of 4095
This guide as been an absolute gem. Great work! I've used it to get my old FX4100 up to 4.5 24/7 stable and just last week got my 8350 up to 4.5 24/7 stable and up to 5 experimentally*. I'm waiting for some funds to become available to pick up one of those nice Phanteks PH-TC14PE_BL.

* = I don't have adequate cooling to do intense stress testing.
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post #700 of 4095
Joined this forum so i can just say, This guide is fantastic! Followed all the directions, everything looking good. Left the 8350 clocked at 4.5Ghz @ 1.38v till i open some space and send more air onto the socket and VRM's, and the back side as well. Once thats taken care of ill tweak it farther.
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