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CPU Spread Spectrum setting for i5-2500K - Page 4

post #31 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

Flattening the peaks/valleys... but higher clocks are squishing the signal...

So you want it always disabled for high overclocks?
post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

Did disabling it back made you system stable again?

Only in the sense that it appears that leaving it on would have required me to readjust other BIOS settings to values that were different from those that have me stable at 4.8GHz with it disabled. I just didn't want to have to go though the exercise of random BSODs once more, and risk corrupting the OS for something that really wasn't going to buy me anything, as I'm happy with my system's performance in its current state.
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by linkin93 View Post

Spread spectrum is a feature of modern CPU's that essentially reduces the amount of interference the CPU and motherboard components generate. It does not alter the base clock from my knowledge, and did not affect my overclock at all (same chip, 2500K).

Leaving it enabled is probably the best bet unless you can confirm that it is causing some specific issue?

Spread spectrum changes the shape of the signals by lowering and broadening peaks/valleys.

Overclock also changes the shape of the signals by increasing their frequency and compressing them.
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post #34 of 37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stahlhart View Post

Only in the sense that it appears that leaving it on would have required me to readjust other BIOS settings to values that were different from those that have me stable at 4.8GHz with it disabled. I just didn't want to have to go though the exercise of random BSODs once more, and risk corrupting the OS for something that really wasn't going to buy me anything, as I'm happy with my system's performance in its current state.

Ok, no worries.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

Spread spectrum changes the shape of the signals by lowering and broadening peaks/valleys.

Overclock also changes the shape of the signals by increasing their frequency and compressing them.

So in essence, you are saying that Spread Spectrum is better left disabled if you are overclocking? I thought lowering and broading peaks/valleys are better for stability, and therefore for overclocking as well?
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

Ok, no worries.
So in essence, you are saying that Spread Spectrum is better left disabled if you are overclocking? I thought lowering and broading peaks/valleys are better for stability, and therefore for overclocking as well?

Lowering and broading peaks/valleys is to reduce EMI, not increase stability.

When overclocking, you are increasing the clock and basically squishing the signals. The issue is that the voltage must be a certain level to be either 1 or 0. However, as you squish the signal, there isn't enough time for the signal to reach the necessary voltage before being read.

The reason increase in Vcore helps is that it makes the peak/valley higher to mitigate the waveform deformation. Spread spectrum lowers the peak/valley so there is more of chance of polling during a transistion state.


Need pen and paper to draw it...
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post #36 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

Lowering and broading peaks/valleys is to reduce EMI, not increase stability.

When overclocking, you are increasing the clock and basically squishing the signals. The issue is that the voltage must be a certain level to be either 1 or 0. However, as you squish the signal, there isn't enough time for the signal to reach the necessary voltage before being read.

The reason increase in Vcore helps is that it makes the peak/valley higher to mitigate the waveform deformation. Spread spectrum lowers the peak/valley so there is more of chance of polling during a transistion state.


Need pen and paper to draw it...

Hmmm, interesting. But would disabling it surely increase stability?
post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

Hmmm, interesting. But would disabling it surely increase stability?

Nothing is sure.


By default, it should be off.
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