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post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feedback guys!

Im still looking at AAS(2yr(take me more than 2 yrs) Applied Associates) with CCIE

Link to the Applied Associates:
http://uaccm.edu/Academics/Degree%20Requirements/ComputerSys_AAS.htm

Talked to my advisor, about the AAS(2yr Applied Associates) with CCIE, and he did agree.

How tough is the CCIE, I heard its crazy hard?

KS
post #22 of 29
CCIE is no joke and it is expensive especially if you go through bootcamp for it. I'm not sure if the CCNA and CCNP are prereqs, but I recommend doing at least the CCNA to make sure you want to proceed. Get through your schooling, get a job, get good at your job, and then look at doing something like the CCIE or MCSM or whatever. You may even be able to get your employer to pay for them.

Me, personally, I would rather wear a blue shirt in a red neighborhood than get that deep in Cisco.
Edited by Oedipus - 2/10/13 at 9:20pm
    
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post #23 of 29
I did the Geek Squad thing for 2 years when I was 18. I am not sure that it helped my knowledge what so ever. It may have even crippled it. My father made me get that job because I was doing so well with computers. I had a few of my own servers based out of Chicago and I was running linux, learning server administration and virtual machines. That took up all of my free time. When I got the job, I stopped that because all I wanted to do was go home and game after a long day of looking at customers porn filled computers. So what did I learn? I learned how to reinstall Windows very quickly. But in the long run, this kind of job hurt me because instead of studying like I should have been, doing my own thing, learning server administration, I was just charging people $250 what they could have done themselves if they could have YouTube'd, "How to reinstall Windows." So point to the story is if you want to do a dead end job, make sure you are at least learning something new that will get you closer to the end goal.

I should note too, I am going to school for a Comp Sci degree, 4 years, and I think if I had more supportive parents that didn't make me get a job, I could have learned most of what I am taking now in school.
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Anyone eles agree:

The ASS, CCNA and CCNP, and then after Im working, got some real experience under my belt, then go for the CCIE?

KS
post #25 of 29
Well, based on this:

http://www.overclock.net/t/1359504/mapping-a-network-hdd-windows7/0_60

A CCIE is a long ways off for you.
    
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post #26 of 29
You can go straight for the CCIE there are no pre-reques.

While a College degree could be nice to have it is not the go to. Yes it may help with landing your first job but imo that is about it.

Do you have to have a college degree, short answer is no. Lets use this as an example. A Network Engineer with 10+years of experience, CCNA and CCNP being able to give solid knowledge with 1 college course in business management taken after 5 years of experience can have an annual salary of approx $200k per year.

Experience is the first and foremost in the networking field outside of the CCIE. If you have a CCIE with no Experience you will still be able to land a $150k+/year job. The chances of that happening is next to 0 though. A CCIE with 10+ years will have an annual salary of $250k+ anywhere.
The written exam for the CCIE is $300 per attempt. This is the easier of the 2 required exams. The hard part comes to the lab exam. Which has a base cost of $1500 per attempt, then your added cost for travel to Cisco say $400 plus hotel accommodations of $200 per night. You can only take the lab at Cisco's San Jose location or RTP in Charlotte NC.
The cost to prepare for the lab is the most costly, if you are using INE or IPExpert will still run you between $5-10k. Of corse you cn try and save some money but then you still need to build a lab at home which can cost between $2-3k... need 9 routers, 2 layer 2 switches, 2 layer 3 switches.

So OP if you are definitely wanting to get into the networking field. Pick up your CCNA, get a job at a helpdesk as Jr network Admin. If you currently live in AR and are considering moving to ID, you may want to reconsider that option and relocate to a larger metropolitan area that has a stronger IT market. The Bay area of CA or Northern VA, DC suburbs should probably be the first 2 choices...DC area if you have a clean past and can get a clearance.
Get some experience for 1-2 years as that Jr Net Admin, pick up your CCNP go somewhere else starting at $50-60k. Put in another 1-2 years leave that job for another starting around $80-90k... rinse and repeat working on your CCIE now you have 5-7 years with your CCIE written and you should be around $120-130k. It isn't hard but 95% of the people out in the real world do not have the intestinal fortitude to stick with it or think it is too far out of grasp and don't even try.
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post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Qedipus:
As the title reads:

"Feedback on real world working Tech's? Going back to school questions?"


Quote:
Oedipus
Well, based on this:

http://www.overclock.net/t/1359504/mapping-a-network-hdd-windows7/0_60

A CCIE is a long ways off for you.

I hope ya werent being rude? And if ya was, "Go fly a kite!" And if ya do work in IT, good luck with that attitude!
post #28 of 29
I'm sorry you feel that way, but people call the CCIE "the PhD of networking" for a reason. I admire your ambition, but I don't think you understand just how serious the CCIE is. Bratas gave you an even better description of how you should proceed, here. I'm not trying to be a wet blanket.

And yes, I do work in IT. I'm pretty good at it. Been doing it for quite a while.
Edited by Oedipus - 2/11/13 at 12:38pm
    
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post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
OK, I took it wrong. Thanks for clearing that up.

EDIT: I do know something on networking, but its been since W2K. I I tend to lean forward more than leap before I look. Ive always asked quetions, before I do something. Or while Im learning to do something that first time.

Ive been in a kitchen for the last 10 yrs, and ya dont get the chance to screw up, kind of hard remaking dinner, after the fact. Thats product, and double time ya just wasted, ya dont screw up that first time, and get it right the first time every time.........


Something ya can aply to anything, not just the kitchen:
Quote:
"Ya can always add, but never remove what ya already added!"
Quote:
EDIT2: Just the way I think and work, just not in the kitchen:

STEP 1: What ya needing ATM
STEP2: Dont know yet, depends on step 3..
STEP3: See Step One.

Ive alwasy got more than a few options in my basket, and more than one way to do em, and had more than a few nights where, I went through more than a dozen of my 3 steps!
KS
Edited by knightsilver - 2/11/13 at 1:05pm
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