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Overclocking i5 3570K With Only the CPU Multiplier Questions? - Page 2

post #11 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ophaq View Post

Alright, thanks. biggrin.gif
By the way, how does OCing with Turbo Boost compare with just adjusting the clock multiplier? Is there any difference in performance?

with 1155, those are basically the same thing, turbo multi is the clock multi, disabling the turbo will also disables the clock multi adjustment.
yeah it's confusing but once you get to the bios you will see.

basically, there is no clock multiplier in the bios, there is only turbo multi, but what you are actually adjusting is the clock multi.
post #12 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ophaq View Post


The reason why I don't want to increase the voltage is because OCing that way is confusing and more time consuming. I would rather just adjust one thing and leave the rest to the motherboard. Some people do it that way, and if the BIOS keeps the voltages under reasonable conditions (such as 4.4Ghz below 1.32V), then it shouldn't be a problem for me as long as it's stable, gets good temperatures, and doesn't shorten the lifespan of the CPU. Speaking of which, would volting a CPU at above the amount of volts it should normally have at its clock speed shorten its lifespan (For example: if I had my CPU at stock 3.4Ghz clock at 1.25V, would it shorten its lifespan because it should normally have say, 1.08-1.10)? Or, would it just increase temperature?
1.) I dunno, I have seen some peoples' BIOS do pretty well with voltages when just leaving things on auto (although the voltages are a bit higher than desired). Usually as long as it's under 1.32V, I'm thinking that I should be fine.

 

If you don't want to shorten the life of your CPU, then don't overclock.  I mean, I believe that it really is just as simple as that.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ophaq View Post


2.) Alright, that's good to know. But I don't know which settings (if any) have been altered in the BIOS when I got my new computer. For example, the company that built it may or may not have set the SSD/HDD to AHCI (or if it's automatically set to default when a HDD is installed on a new build).

 

Most boards these days (if not all) come with the SATA controller in AHCI mode.

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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
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250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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post #13 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

If you don't want to shorten the life of your CPU, then don't overclock.  I mean, I believe that it really is just as simple as that.



Most boards these days (if not all) come with the SATA controller in AHCI mode.
Well, I don't think overclocking necessarily shortens the life of your CPU. It all depends on how you overclock and how far you go in voltages and if you put constant stress on the CPU. And even if it did, I read somewhere that CPUs are supposed to last a long time anyway.

If all I did was up the Turbo Boost clock speed and made sure that voltages didn't exceed 1.32 (preferably 1.28V or so), then I don't think that the CPU's lifespan would shorten, if at all. This is just what I think though as my knowledge is only limited when it comes to overclocking.
post #14 of 72
Thread Starter 
So, I just read about the differences between static and dynamic overclocking. This gave me an idea: What if I did a static OC of say 4.0Ghz by just changing the CPU multiplier (and then stress testing it), and when it's stable I'll change Turbo Boost (dynamic overclock) to 4.4, 4.4, 4.3, 4.2Ghz?

With this in mind, I am wondering what voltages I should look for in HWmonitor (Vcore and VTT). What is the max threshold the i5 3570K can handle before 'burning out'? I read on a forum that one guy had around 1.36V (with an OC of 4.4 or 4.5) when he left the voltages on auto and ran IBT and Prime95 (although Prime95's voltages were a little less).
post #15 of 72
The max voltage most people feel comfortable running Ivy at is around 1.4V. Some people run them up to 1.45V, but they get pretty toasty that high. You should be able to do 4.5 at 1.35V or so, and that's perfectly fine.

I'm not sure what you mean by static and dynamic overclocking - the normal way to overclock the Intel chips is to adjust the maximum turbo multipliers so the chip turbos to the overclock frequency. Most people also set allt he ratios the same, so if you have a 4.4 overclock it'll run that speed no mattter how many cores are active.
Edited by Forceman - 2/15/13 at 10:47am
post #16 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post

The max voltage most people feel comfortable running Ivy at is around 1.4V. Some people run them up to 1.45V, but they get pretty toasty that high. You should be able to do 4.5 at 1.35V or so, and that's perfectly fine.

I'm not sure what you mean by static and dynamic overclocking - the normal way to overclock the Intel chips is to adjust the maximum turbo multipliers so the chip turbos to the overclock frequency. Most people also set allt he ratios the same, so if you have a 4.4 overclock it'll run that speed no mattter how many cores are active.
That's the highest voltages for the Vcore, correct? Does CPU VTT matter at all? After I OC, I'll post pics of my voltages and temps.

A static over clock pretty much means it's "set" and doesn't change, as in adjusting the CPU clock speed. A dynamic overclock is varying, like Turbo Boost where the clock speeds ramp up the clock speed depending on the CPU load. So like I said, when I OC, I'm thinking doing a static OC on the CPU clock to 4.0Ghz, stress testing it, and then doing a dynamic OC on Turbo Boost to 4.4Ghz.

The only reason why I said 4.4, 4.4, 4.3, and 4.2Ghz is because I was thinking that it might cause instability on the other cores if I set all of them to 4.4. What other reason would Turbo Boost have the other cores set to 3.7 and 3.6Ghz with the first two at 3.8Ghz?
post #17 of 72
I don't know why you'd want to do it the way you are explaining. Just set the turbo multipliers to whatever overclock you want and then let the chip idle down when it isn't in use. Why would you want to keep it at 4.0 as a minimum? I'm not even sure that is possible, at least on most boards. You can keep it from downclocking by turning off EIST and C1E, but that's just going to keep it a the overclocked speed all the time.

The reason the normal turbo is set to different levels is to control the power/heat for stock cooling. If you are going to overclock there isn't much advantage to setting individual core speeds - it greatly complicates the testing, if nothing else, since you'd have to test each case individually (somehow).

As for VTT and the other voltages, there isn't much point in changing any of them away from Auto for moderate overclocks like you are talking about. You might be able to lower CPU PLL to help the temps, but I wouldn't mess with it.
post #18 of 72
post #19 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post

I don't know why you'd want to do it the way you are explaining. Just set the turbo multipliers to whatever overclock you want and then let the chip idle down when it isn't in use. Why would you want to keep it at 4.0 as a minimum? I'm not even sure that is possible, at least on most boards. You can keep it from downclocking by turning off EIST and C1E, but that's just going to keep it a the overclocked speed all the time.

The reason the normal turbo is set to different levels is to control the power/heat for stock cooling. If you are going to overclock there isn't much advantage to setting individual core speeds - it greatly complicates the testing, if nothing else, since you'd have to test each case individually (somehow).

As for VTT and the other voltages, there isn't much point in changing any of them away from Auto for moderate overclocks like you are talking about. You might be able to lower CPU PLL to help the temps, but I wouldn't mess with it.
Well it was just a suggestion on how I could do it. Thinking back now, I'm probably just going to do it the original way and up the Turbo Boost clock and then stress test it.

So the main voltage I should be monitoring is only the CPU Vcore then?
post #20 of 72
Pretty much I think. Sin0822 says PLL and VCORE but you don't even really need to touch PLL unless you're running hot hot hot and you need to decrease the heat without lowering VCORE.
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