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So I decided to give Linux another go...

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I've been fiddling with Ubuntu builds for a while now for the specific purpose of folding, and always wanted to get a little more time behind the wheel so to speak. I ended up downloading Mint 14 with XFCE (apparently this is Linux for newbs from what I read in the forum?), having a good old time playing around right now. I originally tried cinnamon DE but it was eating up 50%+ CPU and laggy as heck, I was not pleased. I re-installed with XFCE and now it is much better.

Now I have a few questions for the much more experienced peoples, since I can't seem to find what I'm looking for in a timely manner on google.

#1 issue: My FX 8320 is running MUCH slower than I would expect, I installed the Phoronix testing suite and my CPU at 4.8ghz is barely matching a stock FX 8150 BD chip according to the stats on their site.
#2 issue: if I have to type my password to open something it can take 2-5 minutes to finally pop up. I'm not sure what is causing this, I did not see this under any Ubuntu version I tried.

Could #1 and 2 be related to the SSD I am using? It is a questionable 30GB OCZ Agility series SATA II drive I had spare as I didn't want to put it on my main SSD until I'm sure I like it. It was very difficult to get it to install in the first place as it was a GPT disk, but I think I did it all correctly. I used 500MB for /boot, 8GB for /, 4GB for /swap and the rest for /home.

#3 not an issue, just a curiosity, but I have seen screenshots of desktops with an applet style thing in the right side showing CPU usage, speed, RAM, etc. Can someone tell me what it is called so I can find it?

Sorry if these are covered a lot, my eyes are hurting from the amount of searching I have done so if that labels me an idiot than so be it tongue.gif




My machine specs are as follows since I don't think I put a new rig yet:

- FX 8320
- Asus Sabertooth R2.0
- 16GB Patriot DDR3
- GTX 660
- 30GB OCZ Agility SSD
- NZXT Hale90 850W
post #2 of 7
#1...IF you have an OC for any part (CPU or GPU or RAM) Linux will not be as forgiving as Windows. In otherwords...if your OC is even slightly bad it will manifest in Linux in similar methods like you have described. I know because I found out my 3.6GHz OC with my Athlon 640 and the RAM OC I had both resulted in slow performance. You should install at stock and probably run at stock until you stress test in Linux itself. Windows stable is honestly a joke as I've run or benched with friends systems that were p95 24hr or so on stable in Windows but they would crash or come to crawls or just act plain strange in Linux at those same clocks.

#2 This could be a problem because you likely don't have TRIM enabled (see the essential's thread for Kramy's guide that I added a way to check if it's working).

#3 That is likely Conky. If you aren't into setting up Rainmeter through text files in Windows then you won't be up to setting up Conky in Linux. It's not difficult...it just takes time that people often don't want to spend.

Your problem with Cinnamon don't make sense. Odds are you don't have the proprietary Nvidia drivers installed and that your OC is wrecking things.
     
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core m3-6Y30 Intel HD515 8GB 1866DDR3L Micron M600 MTFDDAV256MBF M.2, 256 GB 
CoolingOSOSMonitor
Fanless Win10 Home x64 Kubuntu 16.04 (requires Linux kernel 4.5/4.6) 13.3 inch 16:9, 1920x1080 pixel, AU Optronics A... 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AthlonIIX4 640 3.62GHz (250x14.5) 2.5GHz NB Asus M4A785TD-M EVO MSI GTX275 (Stock 666) 8GBs of GSkill 1600 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
4GBs of Adata 1333 Kingston HyperX 3k 120GB WD Caviar Black 500GB Hitachi Deskstar 1TB 
Optical DriveCoolingOSOS
LG 8X BDR (WHL08S20) Cooler Master Hyper 212+ Kubuntu x64 Windows 7 x64 
OSMonitorPowerCase
Bodhi Linux x64 Acer G215H (1920x1080) Seasonic 520 HAF912 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
N450 1.8GHz AC and 1.66GHz batt ASUS proprietary for 1001P GMA3150 (can play bluray now!?) 1GB DDR2 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSOS
160GB LGLHDLBDRE32X Bodhi Linux Fedora LXDE 
OSOSMonitorKeyboard
Kubuntu SLAX 1280x600 + Dell 15inch Excellent! 
PowerCase
6 cells=6-12hrs and a charger 1001P MU17 Black 
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CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core m3-6Y30 Intel HD515 8GB 1866DDR3L Micron M600 MTFDDAV256MBF M.2, 256 GB 
CoolingOSOSMonitor
Fanless Win10 Home x64 Kubuntu 16.04 (requires Linux kernel 4.5/4.6) 13.3 inch 16:9, 1920x1080 pixel, AU Optronics A... 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AthlonIIX4 640 3.62GHz (250x14.5) 2.5GHz NB Asus M4A785TD-M EVO MSI GTX275 (Stock 666) 8GBs of GSkill 1600 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
4GBs of Adata 1333 Kingston HyperX 3k 120GB WD Caviar Black 500GB Hitachi Deskstar 1TB 
Optical DriveCoolingOSOS
LG 8X BDR (WHL08S20) Cooler Master Hyper 212+ Kubuntu x64 Windows 7 x64 
OSMonitorPowerCase
Bodhi Linux x64 Acer G215H (1920x1080) Seasonic 520 HAF912 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
N450 1.8GHz AC and 1.66GHz batt ASUS proprietary for 1001P GMA3150 (can play bluray now!?) 1GB DDR2 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSOS
160GB LGLHDLBDRE32X Bodhi Linux Fedora LXDE 
OSOSMonitorKeyboard
Kubuntu SLAX 1280x600 + Dell 15inch Excellent! 
PowerCase
6 cells=6-12hrs and a charger 1001P MU17 Black 
  hide details  
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookie1337 View Post

#1...IF you have an OC for any part (CPU or GPU or RAM) Linux will not be as forgiving as Windows. In otherwords...if your OC is even slightly bad it will manifest in Linux in similar methods like you have described. I know because I found out my 3.6GHz OC with my Athlon 640 and the RAM OC I had both resulted in slow performance. You should install at stock and probably run at stock until you stress test in Linux itself. Windows stable is honestly a joke as I've run or benched with friends systems that were p95 24hr or so on stable in Windows but they would crash or come to crawls or just act plain strange in Linux at those same clocks.

#2 This could be a problem because you likely don't have TRIM enabled (see the essential's thread for Kramy's guide that I added a way to check if it's working).

#3 That is likely Conky. If you aren't into setting up Rainmeter through text files in Windows then you won't be up to setting up Conky in Linux. It's not difficult...it just takes time that people often don't want to spend.

Your problem with Cinnamon don't make sense. Odds are you don't have the proprietary Nvidia drivers installed and that your OC is wrecking things.

Thanks for the input. I just discovered what was causing the slowness/instability since I posted this. I popped into the BIOS to check the boot order and noticed my RAM was running at the lowest JEDEC spec instead of DOCP, I had 1066mhz 11-11-11-30-2T somehow rolleyes.gif One of those weird 990FX detection issues.

I set it back to the correct setting and now everything seems fine, and it is pulling equal scores to the same clocked 8320/8350's.

As far as Conky, I have no issues setting up configuration files. I just needed the name of it so I could find it, thanks!

The Cinnamon problems I am not sure about, I had selected the alternate 310 drivers for my card and it didn't improve much, but I have zero issues with XFCE and I like the appearance better.

Now I just have to figure out how to get my wireless headset working. It is detected but I don't seem to be getting output. A task for tomorrow I guess.
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scorpion49 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookie1337 View Post

#1...IF you have an OC for any part (CPU or GPU or RAM) Linux will not be as forgiving as Windows. In otherwords...if your OC is even slightly bad it will manifest in Linux in similar methods like you have described. I know because I found out my 3.6GHz OC with my Athlon 640 and the RAM OC I had both resulted in slow performance. You should install at stock and probably run at stock until you stress test in Linux itself. Windows stable is honestly a joke as I've run or benched with friends systems that were p95 24hr or so on stable in Windows but they would crash or come to crawls or just act plain strange in Linux at those same clocks.

#2 This could be a problem because you likely don't have TRIM enabled (see the essential's thread for Kramy's guide that I added a way to check if it's working).

#3 That is likely Conky. If you aren't into setting up Rainmeter through text files in Windows then you won't be up to setting up Conky in Linux. It's not difficult...it just takes time that people often don't want to spend.

Your problem with Cinnamon don't make sense. Odds are you don't have the proprietary Nvidia drivers installed and that your OC is wrecking things.

Thanks for the input. I just discovered what was causing the slowness/instability since I posted this. I popped into the BIOS to check the boot order and noticed my RAM was running at the lowest JEDEC spec instead of DOCP, I had 1066mhz 11-11-11-30-2T somehow rolleyes.gif One of those weird 990FX detection issues.

I set it back to the correct setting and now everything seems fine, and it is pulling equal scores to the same clocked 8320/8350's.

As far as Conky, I have no issues setting up configuration files. I just needed the name of it so I could find it, thanks!

The Cinnamon problems I am not sure about, I had selected the alternate 310 drivers for my card and it didn't improve much, but I have zero issues with XFCE and I like the appearance better.

Now I just have to figure out how to get my wireless headset working. It is detected but I don't seem to be getting output. A task for tomorrow I guess.

if you just want some config files already written, you can find them everywhere. Heck, I even have half a dozen or so.
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrl1357 View Post

if you just want some config files already written, you can find them everywhere. Heck, I even have half a dozen or so.

I figured as much, I'm going to try and get it working tonight. Do you know how it detects CPU speed? I have the hardware info program and it thinks my CPU is at 1400mhz all the time even at full load.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scorpion49 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrl1357 View Post

if you just want some config files already written, you can find them everywhere. Heck, I even have half a dozen or so.

I figured as much, I'm going to try and get it working tonight. Do you know how it detects CPU speed? I have the hardware info program and it thinks my CPU is at 1400mhz all the time even at full load.

uses it's own code as far as I know. Most non-minimal distros will scale the CPU clock based on use out of the box though, which could be your problem
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrl1357 View Post

uses it's own code as far as I know. Most non-minimal distros will scale the CPU clock based on use out of the box though, which could be your problem

It seems to be working fine, it is picking up my CPU coming off of idle nicely. I played around with a config file I found on some forum for a little while and ended up like this:

desktop.png
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