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RAID 1 On A Web/Database Server: Software or Hardware - Page 3

post #21 of 33
HP 10K 600GB SAS - $302
HP 10K 600GB SAS - $334
Seagate Savvio 10K 600GB - $240
Hitachi Ultrastar 10K 600GB - $260
Seagate Cheetah 15K 600GB - $260
Dell 15K 600GB - $265
HP 15K 600GB - $225
Hitachi Ultrastar 15K 600GB - $235

I'm sure I can find more if you wish. These prices are USD. I didn't look for retailers in the UK only, since I didn't think that was a requirement to my original statement.
post #22 of 33

I only looked at a couple of those 'deals' - one is a server pull (commonly known as 'second hand') drive, the other is supposedly new but with a 30 day warranty.

 

I'd leave my data in the hands of a consumer grade drive any day.

post #23 of 33
Thread Starter 
@the_beast

I'll have to agree with you. There's no way I'd pay +$200 for a drive with a 30 day warranty.
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post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_beast View Post

I only looked at a couple of those 'deals' - one is a server pull (commonly known as 'second hand') drive, the other is supposedly new but with a 30 day warranty.

I'd leave my data in the hands of a consumer grade drive any day.

You just hit on a point...

You said "My" data. You're right, you'd put your data on a consumer grade drive. But I wouldn't let you put my data, or my friends or my companies data on it.

Personal use is one thing, but business/commercial/enterprise totally different ball game.

I would NEVER use consumer drives in my data center and I would NEVER use second hand drives!
    
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post #25 of 33
The Toshiba/Hitachi/Seagate ones that are "new pull" mean they were pulled from a new box and weren't used. The 30 day warranty is through the seller, but they will still have some factory warranty on them.

Regardless, I wouldn't trust consumer drives (as previously stated) in a datacenter.
post #26 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by tycoonbob View Post

The Toshiba/Hitachi/Seagate ones that are "new pull" mean they were pulled from a new box and weren't used. The 30 day warranty is through the seller, but they will still have some factory warranty on them.

Regardless, I wouldn't trust consumer drives (as previously stated) in a datacenter.

 

If they're pulled, they're almost certainly pulled from an OEM server.  Which almost certainly means they're actually HP/Dell rebrands, with no warranty whatsoever from the drive manufacturer.  And no warranty from Dell or HP either, as they won't be operating in their original server they were sold with (as they would inherit the parent server warranty).

 

You guys realise there is very little difference between consumer drives and their enterprise counterparts, right?  Ever looked at those SATA enterprise drives that HP or Dell will sell you?  Most are bog standard consumer drives, with the same part codes as their desktop versions.

post #27 of 33
My point of view (and in my experience) is that the actual real world MTBF between consumer and pro drives is virtually the same.

It all comes down to the warranty and professional support for big companies, nothing else. That's the real reason they pay the premium.
    
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post #28 of 33
That's not necessarily true. Enterprise drives are rated to run 24/7, and we are just now starting to see that with consumer drives. Enterprise drives have a lower URE count, and a higher MTBF.

HP and Dell rebranded drives are rebranded enterprise drives. Consumer grade SAS drives don't exist.
post #29 of 33

Enterprise drives have a higher rated MTBF - but that doesn't mean they fail any less regularly than their consumer rated drives in the real world.  The stack of dead Cheetah's in the corner of my office is testament to this.  If you want some more in-depth analysis Google did a huge study a few years ago now - you can Google for the results if you're interested.  I suspect (but don't have data to back it up) that the URE rates are paper exercises only as well - being as they sometimes change within a product line as the higher capacity drives are brought out.

 

I've also run consumer grade drives 24/7 for years without issues, and notice no difference in reliability between them and the RE3s and Savvios I also run at home.  Small sample size and statistically irrelevant in the grand scheme of things, but there you have it.

 

I also didn't mention SAS drives when talking about consumer drives - if you re-read my post I was talking about the SATA enterprise drives.  Some of these are Constellation and the like, others are Barracuda just like you buy in Microcentre.

 

Please don't think from this that I don't think enterprise drives have a place - it's just that, on a tight budget as we're talking about in this thread, a consumer SSD RAID array (either RAID1 + a hotspare or two, or for the more paranoid a RAID6 + hotspare(s)) is the better bet for the transactions the system is dealing with. 

post #30 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tycoonbob View Post

Regardless, I wouldn't trust consumer drives (as previously stated) in a datacenter.

Personally, I think that trusting any drive is a recipe for failure. With any storage technology or product, the most important commodity isn't the storage technology or product; it's the data being stored on it. Notice I said "stored on it", not "entrusted to it". It really doesn't matter if the drive is SAS or SATA, consumer or enterprise because ultimately they will fail eventually anyway. What does matter is

a) your operations continue when the hardware fails, because it will fail.
b) they don't fail so often as to be a pain in the proverbial.

However, as with most things in the computing world, there is a multiplicity of factors affecting configuration and purchasing decisions (with money usually being a big player), so as the saying goes, "it depends...".


@thread

What's this "wear levelling" Western Digital is advertising for their Red drives? I was of the opinion that "wear levelling" applied only to SSDs. Is this not so?
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