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What kind of method can cool my computer?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
What Type of Method to Cool Your Computer

REMEMBER COOLING IS NOT AN OPTION ITS A MUST!


Heatsinks: These square or rectangular solid metal objects have many long square 'spines' on the top. 'I lie role of a heatsink is to sit on top of a chip like the CPU or GPU, Or even RAM, and draw out the heat these components are producing through conduction. "This heat then travels along the length Of the heatsink to the top of the individual metal spines where cooler air and a large surface area help in accelerating the dissipation of the heat. Typically a fan is bolted on top of the heatsink to aid in blowing more cool air over the heatsink's spines and hence dissipate the heat more quickly. In sonic cases where just a heatsink is sufficient for the job, no fan is used - such as the heatsinks on the motherboard or heatsinks placed onto VRAM. 'I his is referred to as 'passive cooling'. Note that heatsinks must be kept clean of dust, and have a regular flow of cool air around them to do their job correctly otherwise they cannot dissipate heat efficiently. Further note that depending u.. the metal from which the heatsink is constructed, some heatsinks will be more or less efficient - for example copper heatsinks transfer heat faster, but may dissipate it more slowly than aluminum.

Fans: These. are placed inside and around a PC case by themselves to draw in cool air and/or blow out hot air from the enclosed space around the hardware components on the motherboard. Given the way heatsinks work, the air around component,; will heat up quickly as heatsink(s) dissipate the heat drawn from hardware components. Fans Of varying sizes and speeds aid in cooling the air in the entire case by removing this heat. leans should be regularly cleaned of dust, and if blowing on a component they should have access to plenty of cool air behind them; if sucking hot air from a component, they should exhaust this hot air outside the case or into an area of very cool air-: exhausting hot air into a closed race defeats the purpose of the fan and simply aids in overheating other components. You can also get fans which move larger quantities of air, measured in Cubic Feet Per Minute ((TM) - in general the higher the CFM rating of a fan, the more it will cool a component by moving more cool air around it. I however fans generally make more noise the faster they spin (measured in Decibels), so a balance has to be found between acceptable noise and volume of air moved. Larger fans with lower RPM ratings are usually best for cooling with low noise.

Thermal Tape, Thermal Paste, Thermal Pads, Thermal Glue: These are sonic of the types of thermal interface material used between a heatsink and the actual object it is trying to cool. the reason for using them is simple: for optimal conduction of heat, the greater the surface area of the component which is mated perfectly with the surface area of the heatsink, the more heat which can be transferred efficiently to the heatsink and hence the better the heatsink can do its job and the cooler the component will remain. Thermal paste for example must be spread in a vary thin, even layer on the component to be cooled. Too thick and it will impair conduction of heat, too thin and there will be patchy areas where no contact is made and hence heat will not transfer and build up. Note that sonic thermal materials are electrically conductive, so they must not be placed onto areas where they can cause a short circuit, e.g. between the pins on the CPIJ chip. Also note that using superglue to hold fans and heatsinks on components is not ideal because the glue is both next to impossible to remove, ran run onto other components causing short circuits (and can't be cleaned off), and doesn't have good heat conduction capabilities. Purchase a thermal pad or thermal glue instead if you want an interface that also has adhesive qualities. In general, using thermal interface material of some kind is always recommended for optimal cooling.

Lapping: This is where the surface of the heatsink that will connect with the component to be cooled is continually sanded back and polished until it is perfectly flat and smooth, providing better surface contact and hence better conductivity. Lapping is not essential, and most good heatsinks come with smooth, even contact surfaces, and as long as an appropriate thermal interface is applied correctly, contact area should be excellent regardless. This is because the thermal material should fill in any gaps in either surface if applied correctly, and any additional benefits from lapping are marginal at best. Lapping correctly is a delicate technique that 1 do not recommended for the average overclocker.AN ADVANCE METHOD

Water Cooling: this technique employs a metal block, similar to a heatsink, which is mounted on the component to be cooled, combined with a radiator that acts like a fan. The difference is that the main cooling mechanism in this technique is water and not just air. The water is circulated around the block to draw the heat away from the component, then drawn into and out of the radiator to cool it as it again goes into the block - much like an automobile radiator. Clearly the presence of water around electronic components requires far more care, and hence the technique is more complex than simple heatsink and fan cooling and is not recommended until you do a great deal of research into the topic..AN ADVANCE METHOD

Polders, Phase Change, Liquid Nitrogen: -Chore are several advanced methods Of cooling which can lower temperatures well below freezing point The science behind these methods varies, but essentially they are relatively extreme methods of cooling which rely on the chemical properties of certain substances to accelerate the cooling process. I hey can be very expensive to implement and sometimes have significant downsides. these are for 'hardcore' overclockers who are looking to push their components to the absolute limit and genrally not for everyday usage, although you can purchase premade solutions which implement these sort of extreme cooling measures in a contained environment. Regardless, unless you know what you are doing you are well advised to steer clear of these methods.A VERY ADVANCE METHOD REQUIRE KNOWLEDGES


Cooling Tips

If you are experiencing problems with heat in your system, or if you just want to ensure that you remain problem-tree with regards to heat, try the following simple tips. l hey will help you obtain a more stable overclock or even just a more stable system at stock speeds:
•Remove any obstructions from around your case - for example do not have any of your case grills/air holes obscured, pressed against a wall, blocked by dust etc Insufficient flow of air into and out of the case is the number one cause of heat buildup and heat-related problems. It you have few or no major case tans drawing in cool air and expelling hot air, remove the sides of your case so that the fans on the CPU, graphics card and Power Supply can get a fresh supply of cooler air, and can expel hot air outside the case.
• If you do have several case fans, arrange them so that some are to the front and low in the case, sucking air into the case (as the air near the floor is cooler) and some are to the rear and/or the top of the case, blowing hot air out of the case (where the hot air expelled will rise away from the case). In this situation make sure to keep the sides of your case closed u that the fans have more pressure to suck/blow air through the case's contents like a wind tunnel.
•Don't position a sucking and a blowing fan(s) too close together as they will 'short circuit' each other - that is they will pass air through the shortest line between the two, bypassing your components and hence not cooling them as efficiently. As mentioned above, fans sucking air into your case should be low and on the furthest side of the case from the blowing fans that expel heat from the case.
•Tidy up the internal components of your case I his means all ribbon cables, power cables, etc should 110 clipped or twisty-tied to be as neatly arranged as possible, primarily to avoid blocking the flow of free air around components especially the CPU and graphics card which are the two hottest components in most cases. Securing cabling and ensuring snug plug connections also means you can be sure nothing becomes accidentally unplugged or short-circuited over tinge and hence causes hardware-based errors that will confuse you in the future.
• If using additional internal cooling like larger heatsinks or fans, make sure they are not too heavy for the surface they are mounted on. For example, using extremely large heatsinks on a graphics card can result in the card actually bending under the weight and hence becoming permanently damaged. Lyon a large heatsink mounted on a motherboard can cause it to warp or crack, once again damaging the motherboard PCB beyond repair. If you feel you require such hefty cooling you should consider reducing Your overclock or buying a case that has better cooling instead of risking hysical damage to components through excessive weight.
• Make sure your hard drivee is not smothered by cabling or crammed into a stuffy area of the case with no nearby cooling or fresh air. Higher speed hard drives in particular (i.e. 7,200RPM or 70,000 RPM drives) can heat up quite a bit - one touch of their metal casing will tell you just how hot. I-lard drives are often overlooked in cooling, and yet they are a vital system component, and as such you should make sure they receive plenty of fresh cool air. You can buy specific 'drive cooler' fans which take up a CDROM or Hard drive slot in your case and blow on thee hard drives, but this is not vital as long as you keep the area around the drive(s) free from obstructions.
• Make sure that any heatsinks on the motherboard itself are not covered or blocked by other components or cables, or covered in dust. "There is a reason why these heatsinks are there: because motherboard memory controller chips for example require cooling otherwise they call malfunction due to excessive heat just like any other major component. Don't assume a heatsink without a fan implies the component requires minimal cooling, as sometimes manufacturers skimp on putting a fan on these heatsinks, which simply means the heatsinks have to do more work, so keep them well exposed to cool air. You can even consider installing a small fan on them if you wish, and this can aid in system stability.
post #2 of 5
nice post, ... maybe you could reformat it into a FAQ?
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel E6600 (LL629A) DFI BLOOD IRON P35-T2RL Diamond HD3870 GSkill ( 2x1G) DDR2-800 HZ's 
OSMonitorKeyboardCase
Windows XP Home (OEM) Sceptre 22" + Sceptre 20" Logitech G15 XG VIPER ( hey, it was free.) 
Mouse
LOGITECH MX518 
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My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel E6600 (LL629A) DFI BLOOD IRON P35-T2RL Diamond HD3870 GSkill ( 2x1G) DDR2-800 HZ's 
OSMonitorKeyboardCase
Windows XP Home (OEM) Sceptre 22" + Sceptre 20" Logitech G15 XG VIPER ( hey, it was free.) 
Mouse
LOGITECH MX518 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
hehe another FAQ, there are some mistake on it.
post #4 of 5
Nice writeup!
NEW BUILD 2009
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E8400 (E0) GA-EP45-UD3P EVGA GTX260 4Gb (2x2Gb) Gskill 1066 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Two 1TB WD Caviar Black 32mb cache Samsung 22x DVD R/W Vista Ultimate 64 bit LG W2600 25.5" (1920x1200) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Old Dell one Corsair 750TX Cooler Master 690 Logitech MX518 
Mouse Pad
The place where my mouse lives... 
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NEW BUILD 2009
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E8400 (E0) GA-EP45-UD3P EVGA GTX260 4Gb (2x2Gb) Gskill 1066 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Two 1TB WD Caviar Black 32mb cache Samsung 22x DVD R/W Vista Ultimate 64 bit LG W2600 25.5" (1920x1200) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Old Dell one Corsair 750TX Cooler Master 690 Logitech MX518 
Mouse Pad
The place where my mouse lives... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
thanks for the rep
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