Overclock.net › Forums › Consumer Electronics › Home Audio › Speakers so detailed, sometimes I can hear annoying artifacts in a singer's voice
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Speakers so detailed, sometimes I can hear annoying artifacts in a singer's voice

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
With these speakers I have (Klipsch Icon KB-15) I don't know whether it's a gift or a curse, but I can hear every nuance in a singers voice, even the "crackle" of their vocal cords. I have never experienced this before with any of my previous speakers. I know it's not distortion, but it sounds distracting sometimes when I can hear the singer breath. I guess that's the downside of really good (high sensitivity) speakers...artifacts are enhanced?

It's like even extremely quiet sounds....are crystal clear.

I don't know how else to describe it.



Edited by aweir - 2/20/13 at 7:24pm
post #2 of 7
Klipsch have a "love em or hate em" sound signature. I for one enjoy the horn loaded tweets, while many people loathe them. I have heard the Icon series and enjoyed them.

I have RF 52 II towers and a RC 52 II center, and they are simply incredible for HT in my small bedroom. I picked them up open box, and am very happy with them. I'll gladly take the tiny imperfections in the cabinets in exchange for a heavy discount.
 
Alienware 14
(9 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 4700mq Alienware Nvidia GTX765m 8GB 1600MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Samsung 840 500GB DVD Windows 8 14" 1080P IPS 
Power
150W 
  hide details  
Reply
 
Alienware 14
(9 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 4700mq Alienware Nvidia GTX765m 8GB 1600MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Samsung 840 500GB DVD Windows 8 14" 1080P IPS 
Power
150W 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Don't get me wrong, these are great speakers. I bought the pair at BestBuy when they were on sale for $99, but they are so good at highs and mids, that every single detail is enhanced. I guess I'm just used to crappy speakers with muffled highs.

I was just wondering if anyone else has experienced or noticed this characteristic of Klipsch speakers too.

The RF 52 II have titanium tweeters. Are they harsh at all?
Edited by aweir - 2/22/13 at 1:21pm
post #4 of 7
It could also possibly be your room.

Do you have alot of hardwood, glass, etc. in the room you are listening in?
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
The speakers are on a glass computer table. But like I said, there's nothing wrong with them, it's just that the horn speakers are known to color the sound. As the sound bounces off the sides of the horn and is amplified, the sound is colored by the material of the horn itself. Some people describe it like listening to a megaphone, with a "phonograph" type sound on the midrange frequencies. Thus, to me it seems like sometimes the vocals has a slight reverberation/echo to it, making it seem more like a live performance.
Edited by aweir - 2/22/13 at 1:18pm
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by aweir View Post

The RF 52 II have titanium tweeters. Are they harsh at all?

I don't think so at all. I find them highly detailed and bright, but not "harsh".
 
Alienware 14
(9 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 4700mq Alienware Nvidia GTX765m 8GB 1600MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Samsung 840 500GB DVD Windows 8 14" 1080P IPS 
Power
150W 
  hide details  
Reply
 
Alienware 14
(9 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 4700mq Alienware Nvidia GTX765m 8GB 1600MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Samsung 840 500GB DVD Windows 8 14" 1080P IPS 
Power
150W 
  hide details  
Reply
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by aweir View Post

The speakers are on a glass computer table. But like I said, there's nothing wrong with them, it's just that the horn speakers are known to color the sound. As the sound bounces off the sides of the horn and is amplified, the sound is colored by the material of the horn itself. Some people describe it like listening to a megaphone, with a "phonograph" type sound on the midrange frequencies. Thus, to me it seems like sometimes the vocals has a slight reverberation/echo to it, making it seem more like a live performance.

The horn "honk" is something that I have read a lot about. Some suggest that you should put some sort of clay on the outside of the horn(inside the box) to try and keep reverberations from occurring so much. Earl Geddes even puts some foam at the exit of his horns to tame the sound a bit and not be too "bright"

This could be a good experiment for you to try out.

Get some polyester or some other type of material and stuff it lightly in the horn and then put the grills back on to hold the stuffing in. Note, do NOT pack it in there, it is supposed to be a little loose but full.

Horns in general are considered to be "forward" and "bright" and Tom Danley of Danley Sound Labs suggests that horns should be be tuned so that the frequency response curve has a slight downward slope as you go up in the frequency response due to this. This could be another fun experiement but much more expensive as you would have to learn how to build your own crossover or buy a DSP and amplifiers.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Home Audio
Overclock.net › Forums › Consumer Electronics › Home Audio › Speakers so detailed, sometimes I can hear annoying artifacts in a singer's voice