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The non-Linux POSIX chit-chat thread - Page 2

post #11 of 55
I've used FreeBSD before when playing with jails, there pretty sweet. thumb.gif

I also had Oracle Solaris on my laptop for a couple months at one time just to mess around with, I found it to be pretty usable and easy to work with.
Edited by nyxcharon - 2/28/13 at 5:27pm
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post #12 of 55

I've had some experience with Solaris and FreeNAS (based on FreeBSD).

post #13 of 55
I run OpenBSD and FreeBSD at home, but my professional job is working with AIX. AIX has some really cool technology, unfortunately only businesses can afford the hardware to run it.
post #14 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrl1357 View Post

While I find the figure of 93% of the devs leaving highly suspect, I see almost all non-linux projects as with a pretty bleak outlook. The market share and user interest goes down everyday. With a small GNU/Linux distro this wouldn't be to much of a problem as independent projects have been managed by tiny teams, but when they have to maintein a kernel and userland that job is harder if they do lose devs. By main hope is that debian stands by GNU/kFreeBSD and it's gets some good kernel devolopment from that.

FreeBSD will be alive and kicking long after the next "flavor of the month" linux distro dies out. FreeBSD is one of the best run open source projects out there, most community run linux distros don't have a Foundation set up like the FreeBSD foundation which allows companies and individuals to make tax deductible donations.

Watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNkqKdLm1rU
post #15 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainBlame View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrl1357 View Post

While I find the figure of 93% of the devs leaving highly suspect, I see almost all non-linux projects as with a pretty bleak outlook. The market share and user interest goes down everyday. With a small GNU/Linux distro this wouldn't be to much of a problem as independent projects have been managed by tiny teams, but when they have to maintein a kernel and userland that job is harder if they do lose devs. By main hope is that debian stands by GNU/kFreeBSD and it's gets some good kernel devolopment from that.

FreeBSD will be alive and kicking long after the next "flavor of the month" linux distro dies out. FreeBSD is one of the best run open source projects out there, most community run linux distros don't have a Foundation set up like the FreeBSD foundation which allows companies and individuals to make tax deductible donations.

Watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNkqKdLm1rU

sure, they've meet every fund raising goal and it's impossible to get any real stats on these things, I love them I do really hope not only do they do well but this systemd/udev/linux only type problem we are beginning to see with some programs stops
post #16 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainBlame View Post

working with AIX. AIX has some really cool technology, unfortunately only businesses can afford the hardware to run it.

hmm .. can you elaborate on this a bit ... what is 'so cool' about AIX? & why is the hardware so special? I'm really not at all familiar with it. A group we partner with at work has some things that run on AIX ... and, well, lets nicely put it this way - it doesn't seem to go very well for them smile.gifwink.gif
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post #17 of 55
Thread Starter 
If I recall correctly AIX runs on a niche CPU architecture, a little like how Solaris is/was often bundled with Sparc.
post #18 of 55
AIX and POWER?
post #19 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd mcclendon View Post

hmm .. can you elaborate on this a bit ... what is 'so cool' about AIX? & why is the hardware so special? I'm really not at all familiar with it. A group we partner with at work has some things that run on AIX ... and, well, lets nicely put it this way - it doesn't seem to go very well for them smile.gifwink.gif

POWER and AIX is what you get when you cross mainframe technology with UNIX. It is a very unique system, but sadly misunderstood by UNIX administrators from other UNIX flavours. If your partners AIX machines are not working well, I would say its due to lack of expertise of the people managing the server.

A lot of the advantages are in the POWER hardware itself. Most of the functionality you get from the intel hypervisors like vmware are actually built into the POWER hardware. For example we could carve up our POWER machines at the bus level 12 years ago. I believe you guys call this IO passthrough. Except our implementation is decades more matured as the mainframe has been doing this for years and it shows. In fact there are many things that we were doing 5-10 years ago in AIX that people are only doing now on Intel.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGATzoX7bmE


The first thing you will notice about AIX is that it defines physical and logical layers throughout the entire system. In AIX all hardware interfaces have physical and logical layers. In other words it doesn't just end with having a logical layer at the storage level in the form of LVM. I believe LVM was first implemented in AIX in 1989 and it predates HP LVM by 5 years and Linux by 12 years.

On a storage level you really can't beat AIX LVM implementation which is streamlined into the system better than any other system. You cannot run AIX without LVM, in other words you can't partition a disk and throw JFS2 directly onto it. The boot partition lives inside the root volume group and is just another LV on the root PV, we have been able to LVM mirror the boot/root disks, and/or fibre boot and multipath the boot lun since before I have been working with AIX (8+ years). We also don't need a separate LOG disk/parition for LVM mirroring.

JFS2 is a world class filesystem, it supports CIO, DIO, AIO. I've never seen a JFS2 filesystem corrupt that FSCK couldn't 100% fix and JFS2 only corrupts if you do something really stupid like pull out all paths to its virtual disks while the guest is still running. We could shrink JFS2 filesystems on the fly for the last 9 years now. We also don't need to manually manage LV sizes and resize the FS to the LV. You just simply tell the system what size you want the filesystem to be. I still chuckle when I look at linux LVM because it looks so primitive in comparison.

AIX commands are remarkably consistent across the entire system, using the following prefixes:
mk="make" (eg. mklv, mkvg, mkuser, mkgroup, mksysb, mkitab)
rm="remove" (eg. rmlv, rmvg, rmuser, rmgroup, rmdev, rmitab)
ls="list" (eg. lslv, lsvg, lsuser, lsgroup, lsitab)
ch="change" (eg. chlv, chvg, chuser, chgroup, chitab)

The output of the ls commands are usable to other commands. In other words I can take the output of lsuser and apply it to mkuser or chuser without formatting the output.
Edited by CaptainBlame - 3/4/13 at 1:30am
post #20 of 55
AIX and POWER hardware are designed to work together like OSX and Apple hardware. There is no such thing as a lack of driver for power hardware in AIX. You can query hardware better in AIX than any other UNIX system and it is consistent across all hardware. All hardware has physical addresses so you can pin point hardware precisely, ie drawnumber, slot number, port number. Since POWER systems have additional circuitry for error checking, your can bring up hardware error reports pointing to the exact piece of hardware that has failed, there is no guess work.

Enterprise POWER systems are rated at 99.9999% uptime, that means everything can be replaced on the fly. Memory failure, CPU failure? Yep it can deactivate faulty memory, CPU and replace it with spare memory, CPU automatically. All Enterprise POWER systems will have spare un-allocated CPU and memory, kind of like disk hotspares in RAID.

Because POWER hardware is the shizz, we don't need to scale it horizontally like Linux clusters for more power. Our systems scale vertically to epic big and generally you only need 2 or 4 nodes for horizontal scaling in the form of POWERHA for redundancy. No matter how good you think Linux cluster tools are, POWERHA cluster tools is better.

We can take full system backups while the system is still running and bare metal restore the system to its original state on different hardre, this is called mksysb and it comes with the system. This restore isn't just an rsync at the file level, it will rebuild your LVM too and the image is bootable.

To be honest if you want to know more about AIX, you should just read this post by a former work colleague: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/mydeveloperworks/blogs/cgaix/entry/aix_or_linux_on_power?lang=en
Edited by CaptainBlame - 3/3/13 at 10:24pm
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