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Quick n00b overclocking question

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
First off, I apologize for this question because I know it's most likely very n00bish. I haven't been able to find much to answer the question adequately though, so I figured I'd ask it here.

I'm currently in the process of overclocking for the first time, and it's going very well thus far. As of now I have my 3770K up to 4.6GHz at 1.2000v, with max temps just barely crossing 60C on full load. My only question is this: even though the CPU voltage is set at 1.2000v in the bios, it's showing up as either 1.168v or 1.176v in CPU-Z. Which one is correct, and why do they display different values?

Here's a picture of what I'm talking about:
post #2 of 6
I think it's actually at 1.168 at that moment, because your motherboard will lower vcore due to load. I think it's called load-line calibration.
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RPI Compy
(14 items)
 
Sister's rig
(11 items)
 
Family HTPC
(10 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
5820k MSI X99S MPOWER GTX 980 Ti 8x4gb 3000 MHz Crucial DDR4 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 950 Pro Custom WC loop 480mm & 560mm Windows 10 ROG SWIFT 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
CM Quickfire TK Greens Corsair RM1000w Custom 3d-printed case Steelseries Rival 
Mouse PadAudio
CSGO Steelseries Creative Aurvana Live! 2 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Amd FX 8320 Asus sabertooth 990FX Nvidia GTX 760 4GB g.skill ares 12GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO 250GB HP thingy Phanteks TC12DX Windows 7 
PowerCaseMouse
Raidmax 530w White FD R4 Logitech G400 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD A10 5800k Asrock pro-4 m His 6770 1GB G.skill 2133 8GB 
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Samsung 840 ssd 128 GB Lg blu-ray combo drive Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO Windows 7 
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post #3 of 6
It's normal for the voltage under load to be a little lower than what you have set, it is called Vdroop. You can counter the effect, if it becomes a problem with stability, by changing (increasing) your setting for Load Line Calibration (some BIOSes call it Multi Step Load Line). If you set it to something in the middle of the range (depending on what your board uses it could be Medium or High, 50 or 75%, or Level 3 or Level 2 - something in that area) it should help reduce the drop. Just don't set it so high that the voltage actually goes up under load, as that causes a lot of additional stress on the power delivery system.

And that's a very good voltage for that speed.
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post

It's normal for the voltage under load to be a little lower than what you have set, it is called Vdroop. You can counter the effect, if it becomes a problem with stability, by changing (increasing) your setting for Load Line Calibration (some BIOSes call it Multi Step Load Line). If you set it to something in the middle of the range (depending on what your board uses it could be Medium or High, 50 or 75%, or Level 3 or Level 2 - something in that area) it should help reduce the drop. Just don't set it so high that the voltage actually goes up under load, as that causes a lot of additional stress on the power delivery system.

And that's a very good voltage for that speed.

Thanks for the answer, that helped a lot. I had the Load Line Calibration set at 50%, but now that I'm getting to higher clocks I raised it to 75%. After I did that the voltage rate in CPU-Z is a lot closer to what I set in the bios. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing, but considering that my system's running smoothly I'm not too worried about it.

I'm now at 4.7GHz at 1.230v (1.224v in CPU-Z), and temps are getting to the mid-to-high 60's on full-load, though not crossing 70C yet. You still think I have room to grow before I call it a day?
post #5 of 6
I think so - you can easily and safely go to 1.3V (and even 1.35V is no problem) and push the temps into the low-80s under load. Somewhere soon, though, you'll reach a point where it'll take a lot of voltage to go higher, your call on whether to push past it or not.
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post

I think so - you can easily and safely go to 1.3V (and even 1.35V is no problem) and push the temps into the low-80s under load. Somewhere soon, though, you'll reach a point where it'll take a lot of voltage to go higher, your call on whether to push past it or not.

I think I'll be relatively conservative with it. I don't have any desire to keep pushing it for the sole purpose of bragging rights.

Still, I'm starting to see why people get addicted to this. It's really fun seeing how far I can push this thing!
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