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http://www.anandtech.com/show/6813/nvidia-launches-quadro-k4000-k2000-k2000d-k600
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Back in August of 2012 NVIDIA announced their first Kepler based Quadro part, the Quadro K5000. Based on NVIDIA’s at the time leading GK104 GPU, K5000 was the customary generational update to the workstation-focused Quadro family, bringing to the Quadro family Kepler generation features such as support for 4 monitors, NVIDIA’s NVENC video encoder, and of course greater rendering performance. However since its launch the K5000 has stood alone as the only Kepler based desktop Quadro card, with the older Fermi based products filling out the rest of the Quadro family. Today that will finally be changing as NVIDIA fleshes out the rest of the Quadro lineup with new Kepler based parts.

Altogether NVIDIA will be launching 4 new Quadro cards, intending to fill out the lower performance, higher volume market segments below the $2,250 K5000. These cards will be the K4000, the K2000, the K2000D, and the K600.

ust as how the K5000 was the direct successor of the Fermi based Quadro 5000, these new cards are the direct successors of their respective Fermi counterparts, and will be occupying roughly the same market segments. At $1,269 will be the GK106 based K4000, which combines 768 CUDA cores with 3GB of RAM. Below that is the K2000 at $599, a GK107 based part packing 384 CUDA cores and 2GB of RAM. K2000 will come in two variants, a standard variant with 2 DisplayPorts and 1 DL-DVI port, and the K2000D which flips that for 2 DL-DVI ports and 1 mini-DisplayPort. Finally at $199 is a further cut down GK107 part, the K600, NVIDIA’s entry-level Kepler Quadro card featuring 192 CUDA cores, 1GB of RAM, and 1 DisplayPort along with 1 DL-DVI port.



Similar to how the Fermi Quadro cards were handled, the Kepler Quadro cards are essentially stratified based on a mix of features and performance. Partial ECC support for example will not make it down to any of these new cards, while NVIDIA’s GPUDirect for Video technology is being made available on the K4000 and above, but not the K2000 or K600. Meanwhile relative to their Fermi predecessors performance has increased across the board, with the specific gains varying with the SKU and the resource needs of any given application.

Of course the big draw for the Kepler Quadro family is Kepler’s improved display controller, which adds support for DisplayPort 1.2, support for 4K displays, and at the same time doubles the number of displays that can be driven from 2 on Fermi to 4 on most Kepler cards. Like the K5000, the K4000 and K2000 will be able to drive up to 4 displays, but in an important difference, owing to their smaller profiles these cards will not feature 4 display outputs. Rather in a first for NVIDIA, they will be relying in DisplayPort 1.2’s MST/daisy-chaining functionality to drive 2+ monitors off a single DP output.



Similarly, with the increased number of supported displays per card NVIDIA has upgraded their Mosaic software to match Kepler’s capabilities, increasing the number of displays that can be part of a mosaic. Mosaic now supports 16 displays spread over 4 video cards, for 4 displays per video card.

Finally, as with the Fermi generation of Quadro cards, the Kepler generation of Quadro cards will be top-to-bottom Maximus enabled for blended graphics/compute tasks. This means any Kepler Quadro card can be paired with a Tesla K20 to offload compute onto the K20 in supported applications, freeing up the Quadro card for graphical tasks while boosting compute performance. Given the $3000+ price tag on a K20 we don’t expect to see very many environments using Maximus with the K600, but from what we’ve seen in the past, Quadro 2000 series cards have ended up being Maximus pairings for use in tasks where a Quadro card is being used to visualize Tesla results.

On a final note, unlike the K5000 this will be a hard launch, so K4000, K2000, and K600 cards will be available starting today. This goes for both retail add-in card sales and for pre-built OEM systems, with OEMs shipping systems equipped with NVIDIA’s latest Quadro cards as soon as today.
I've suspected this since January when they leaked stuff in the drivers for Linux (and confirmed via HP Z820 workstation leak on March 1st, see http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/14548_div/14548_div.HTML), now it's official.

The only place I saw it available for purchase last night is on Xi Computer (as part of a system). (nVidia® Quadro® K600 1GB = $159 , nVidia® Quadro® K2000 2GB = $429 , nVidia® Quadro® K4000 3GB = $749 http://www.xicomputer.com/products/Configure_prof.asp?model=mtowersp4&configid=252481)

Back in January Techpowerup said the K4000 was supposed to be GK104 akin to the K5000, so now it's weaker, GK106 = GTX 660. frown.gif

If the K4000 is 1.2Teraflops SP compute, then the $600-700 W7000 (based off HD7870, with the same number of "stream processors") just stomps it with 2.4 TFLOPs single precision and 152 GFLOPs double precision floating point performance, provided you don't need CUDA. Even the $500ish Firepro W5000 has 1.3 TFLOPs single precision and 79.2 GFLOPs double precision floating point performance.

For $900, I really wonder if the GTX Titan is better than the $1200+ Quadro K4000. Specwise, GK110 has better compute by a longshot, but perhaps the drivers aren't tuned properly.

Time to shine, AMD... drop those prices a bit tongue.gif.

edit: http://semiaccurate.com/2013/03/05/nvidia-bifurcates-their-professional-graphics-lines/#.UTZAQ6LOHTp
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The take away message here is that the older GF11x GPUs and the AMD Tahiti GPU are balanced, Kepler skews GK10x towards graphics and the GK110 towards compute.

edit 2: http://develop3d.com/blog/2013/03/review-nvidias-cad-focused-kepler-quadro-gpus-k600-k2000-and-k4000
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One of the reasons the Quadro K4000 comes out so well in the power stakes is the fact that Nvidia has out stripped double precision floating point operations from all Kepler-based Quadros, concentrating instead on single precision.
...
For most CAD users this won’t make the slightest bit of difference – only those interested in harnessing the power of the GPU in simulation applications like Ansys and Simulia will need to take notice.

Whereas Fermi-based Quadros could be used to accelrate CUDA or OpenCL optimised simulation applications, with Kepler this requires a dedicated Tesla GPU compute board. Nvidia’s Tesla K20 works alongside any of the new Quadros to complete Nvidia’s branded Maximus solution. However, at £2,490 for a single Tesla K20, GPU compute with Maximus doesn’t come cheap, though Nvidia points out that in some CAE workflows it can be partnered with a low-end Quadro K600.

For those on a budget Kepler’s support for single precision floating point operations means the cards can still be used for GPU-based ray trace rendering in applications like 3ds Max Design and Catia Live Rendering.
...
or most CAD users this won’t make the slightest bit of difference – only those interested in harnessing the power of the GPU in simulation applications like Ansys and Simulia will need to take notice.

Whereas Fermi-based Quadros could be used to accelrate CUDA or OpenCL optimised simulation applications, with Kepler this requires a dedicated Tesla GPU compute board.
...
For those on a budget Kepler’s support for single precision floating point operations means the cards can still be used for GPU-based ray trace rendering in applications like 3ds Max Design and Catia Live Rendering.
no DPFP.
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When RealView was switched on everything changed. This feature of SolidWorks - which delivers advanced shading in real time, including self-shadowing and scene reflections - exposed the limitations of Nvidia’s new entry-level card. The score of 30 is not bad per se - perfectly adequate for small assembly modelling - but significantly off the pace when you consider the Nvidia Quadro K5000 hit 78 and the AMD FirePro family between 80 and 90 in a comparative machine.

also
http://hothardware.com/News/Nvidia-Launches-Quadro-Refresh-Brings-Kepler-To-the-Midrange-Workstation-Market/
Edited by AlphaC - 3/5/13 at 4:23pm
Workstation stuff
(407 photos)
SpecViewperf 12.0.1
(152 photos)
 
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Workstation stuff
(407 photos)
SpecViewperf 12.0.1
(152 photos)
 
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