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4.6 GHz OC On Stock Voltage (Is This Normail For Ivy?) - Page 3

post #21 of 29
People complain about temps...

It doesn´t awnser his question.

To explain some physics underlying overvolting.

When you overclock a cpu the Temp rises we all know this what happens then, the conductive material in the cpu becomes more resistent to electrical current.

So you need a given current to overcome this resistance to switch all transistors in a given row.

This is why people mod Voltage to overcome the higher resistance from the higer Temps.

SO when he can get nice clocks at stock voltage there is no need to raise voltage.

Cause actually a raised voltage would mean more heat on the chip wich would translate to more resistance on a physical level wich would actually counter the benifits.

You need x cooling for x wattage to make it run if you raise voltage you raise your wattage output and raise the heat you need more cooling.

It´s dog chaseing tail.

So if anything can make his system more stable it´s actually cooling.
Edited by erniv2 - 3/11/13 at 5:18pm
post #22 of 29
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Edited by erniv2 - 3/11/13 at 5:19pm
post #23 of 29
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Edited by erniv2 - 3/11/13 at 5:19pm
post #24 of 29
Oo can anybody delete 2 of the 3 posts i actually posted 3 times no idea how biggrin.gif.
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by erniv2 View Post

People complain about temps...

It doesn´t awnser his question.

To explain some physics underlying overvolting.

When you overclock a cpu the Temp rises we all know this what happens then, the conductive material in the cpu becomes more resistent to electrical current.

So you need a given current to overcome this resistance to switch all transistors in a given row.

This is why people mod Voltage to overcome the higher resistance from the higer Temps.

SO when he can get nice clocks at stock voltage there is no need to raise voltage.

Cause actually a raised voltage would mean more heat on the chip wich would translate to more resistance on a physical level wich would actually counter the benifits.

You need x cooling for x wattage to make it run if you raise voltage you raise your wattage output and raise the heat you need more cooling.

It´s dog chaseing tail.

So if anything can make his system more stable it´s actually cooling.

Exactly, this says plenty. Many people with an i7 chip would be lucky to OC to 4.5GHz without having to change bios settings. So with the perfect given response above, my chip is a champ. Trying to take some of the advice given in this thread is when I started to run into problems (NEVER HAD A CRASH OR BLUE SCREEN UNTIL I CHANGED MY VCORE). It's funny because I think I would of screwed up my chip faster listening to most of you guys then I would of by myself in a ignorant state of mind. I think allot of enthusiast come here and chime in with comments because they THINK they know how everything works (which is typical in public furoms). I understand that screenie I posted shows high temps (UNDER LOAD). Like I said before, I do not use anything that would load my CPU that high. So in other words, to hardcore gamers this would be an issue. To me, not so much. When it all falls down this OC is stable for my everyday use as long as i'm watching my temps. Especially if i'm on stock voltages with no problems. I still won't turn my back to what seems to be the best furom on the web for custom CPU's. So if anybody would like to post anything positive in regards to this situation please do so.
post #26 of 29
If it isn't an issue then I guess you're fine.

Your Intel Burn Test Gflops is incredibly low (reminds me of my q9650), I average over 100 on my 3770k at 4.6 (around 1.28V offset llc3). That tends to be either it isn't stable / your not getting enough voltage to the CPU(plus hitting the 95C on Ivy throttles the chip?)



Also check this out for WHEA errors, http://www.overclock.net/t/1317335/whea-error-alert-guide-or-how-i-got-out-of-wheaville/0_100

It's another sign of general instability if you wish to try it out.

Gamers are probably the last to care about stability, since they just game. If you run projects like folding@home or World Community Grid, then that's where you get people like me who run Prime95 with 90% of our memory for 24+ hours.

And your voltages in HW monitor seem odd, +3.3V at 2V, +5V and +12V readings at 2V and 3V?
post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shogon View Post

If it isn't an issue then I guess you're fine.

Your Intel Burn Test Gflops is incredibly low (reminds me of my q9650), I average over 100 on my 3770k at 4.6 (around 1.28V offset llc3). That tends to be either it isn't stable / your not getting enough voltage to the CPU(plus hitting the 95C on Ivy throttles the chip?)



Also check this out for WHEA errors, http://www.overclock.net/t/1317335/whea-error-alert-guide-or-how-i-got-out-of-wheaville/0_100

It's another sign of general instability if you wish to try it out.

Gamers are probably the last to care about stability, since they just game. If you run projects like folding@home or World Community Grid, then that's where you get people like me who run Prime95 with 90% of our memory for 24+ hours.

And your voltages in HW monitor seem odd, +3.3V at 2V, +5V and +12V readings at 2V and 3V?

I have to educate myself on setting the vcore to my CPUs' liking. Right now its set to auto so as long as i'm not doing anything super intensive I guess i'm good for now. As for my OCD, eventually, I do want to know that my computer is stable. I know every CPU is different but you are set to 1.280v, correct?. Is this the range I should be in for my 4.6 OC?
post #28 of 29
It's hard to say since like you said every chip is unique, and thus requires its own voltage. I've had experience with 3 3770k's. The first is much like my current chip, around 1.28V for 4.6, but sadly I killed it de-lidding.

2nd chip, was crap. It took over 1.35V for 4.5 Ghz, and that was the max it would even load.

Returned it to Fry's, and this chip is the one that reads around 1.28-1.29 VID in RealTemp at 4.6 load.

I would say, anything for 4.6, under 1.3V, is good(based on my 3 chip experience, also used a 3570k briefly, also took 1.28V for 4.6). If you need more then that its no biggie, just keep your temps under 90C at max I would say (for throttling) and you'll be good. Even with my crazy water loop Ivy is one hot chip, I'm used to 45C gaming load on Sandy, add another 10C and you got Ivy.
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shogon View Post

It's hard to say since like you said every chip is unique, and thus requires its own voltage. I've had experience with 3 3770k's. The first is much like my current chip, around 1.28V for 4.6, but sadly I killed it de-lidding.

2nd chip, was crap. It took over 1.35V for 4.5 Ghz, and that was the max it would even load.

Returned it to Fry's, and this chip is the one that reads around 1.28-1.29 VID in RealTemp at 4.6 load.

I would say, anything for 4.6, under 1.3V, is good(based on my 3 chip experience, also used a 3570k briefly, also took 1.28V for 4.6). If you need more then that its no biggie, just keep your temps under 90C at max I would say (for throttling) and you'll be good. Even with my crazy water loop Ivy is one hot chip, I'm used to 45C gaming load on Sandy, add another 10C and you got Ivy.

If I ever decide that I wanna test my ball size, i'll think of the moment when I read your last post. Moment of silence...............May your first chip rest in peace. Thanks for the info Shogon.
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