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Need a 64 bit Linux recommended

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hey guys,
I know there are a few of these types of threads around, but figured I would ask since I'm still new to the whole Linux world and need a bit more clarification on certain things. I recently built a new computer, but used my old hard drive, which has XP SP3 32 bit on it. With that though, I'm limited to a max of 4gb ram, and I can't use the full graphical power of the system.
I have been looking for a new 64 bit OS, and someone recommended that I try Linux instead of spending $200 on Windows 7. The thing is, I don't have any experience with Linux, and even less knowledge about it. I have been doing some research on it, and the different distro's but there seem to be quite a few, and even more kernels/ packages after that.
The main thing that I'm worried about though is compatibility with all of my hardware and software. I play a few games (TERA, Minecraft, some Steam games), and just want to make sure that everything is going to work before I make a jump. I know that I can partition my hard drive to put a new OS on it, but I don't know if I want to do that.
Can you guys recommend a Linux set up for me? I'm wanting something light, and very fast, but I also don't have a lot of knowledge about terminal commands or how to set things up on Linux either... Suggestions?
post #2 of 16
If you plan on playing games on this system. Don't move to linux unless all your games are linux compatible.

Otherwise ubuntu is a beginners linux distro.
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Cosmos
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post #3 of 16
Forget ubuntu try Lubuntu it has standard user interface, ie start menu etc etc unlike ubuntu. that said, if your gonna game stick to windows.

EDIT: also there are kernel mods for 32bit windows that lets you use over 3.5 gb.
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post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Yeah, that's what I'm worried about. I guess I could do some research into that though and see if the ones I play are in fact ok in Linux. However, if they are ok with being ran in Linux, I think that my gaming experience could be much better since I will be able to "unlock" more ram (it's already in my system, XP just can't use it), and be able to turn up the graphical properties.
I'm been looking through the different distro's and think that I may want to try SlackWare with KDE, although I really don't know how to combine them. I do want to be able to manipulate my GUI to suit my tastes, but don't want a system hog of an OS like Windows is.
post #5 of 16
*buntu has the best support and if your games run linux there is high change they will run on *buntu. i'd also suggest looking here, http://appdb.winehq.org/ your gonna need it.
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post #6 of 16
i LOVE Linux Mint. its built off ubuntu so its pretty similar to it. Great beginner Linux OS and just all-round awesome thumb.gif
    
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post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Baaahhh... just found out TERA doesn't work with WINE. is there a way for me to get a 64 bit version of XP?
post #8 of 16
This is kind of a weird subject when it comes to Linux Users, if you ask "what distro should I use?' everyone will likely give you a different answer. That being said, here are my suggestions.

Linux Mint Debian Edition is a good place to start. You can download the iso and run it as a live cd or install in in a VM. I suggest installing it in a VM, but really it's up to you. LMDE is pretty much ready to use once you get it installed, meaning it comes with stuff you're likely going to need/want already installed (browser, music player, etc, etc).


Arch, really this suggestion is for if/when you feel comfortable with Linux as a whole and would like to move on to learning more about it. There is a pretty good install guide here on OCN, written by Shrak. Arch is more of a Linux how you want it. All that gets installed are the basics and then you choose what gets installed on top of that (DE, window managers, music player, brower, etc, etc). Even if you don't want to got through learning all the stuff required to using Arch, I highly recommend that you bookmark their wiki. The information there is invaluable and will apply to every distro.

Now that I have gotten the suggestions out of the way, I'm going to discuss some of your goals for Linux install. How light and fast it is, really depends on the DE that you use and all of the stuff that comes with it. Going with a lighter DE such as XFCE, as compared to KDE or Gnome, will be a little better. There are usually trade offs though so really the best way to find out what works best for you is to try more than one, which you can do with any distro. Another thing that you'll have to get used to is that when you want to install software, you don't need to go to a website and download it. Instead you'll use a package manager (either terminal or gui depending on how you want to do it) and it will download the the program from a repo and install it for you.

If you have any questions that Linux community here is pretty friendly so feel free to ask away.
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FateousMaximous View Post

This is kind of a weird subject when it comes to Linux Users, if you ask "what distro should I use?' everyone will likely give you a different answer. That being said, here are my suggestions.

Linux Mint Debian Edition is a good place to start. You can download the iso and run it as a live cd or install in in a VM. I suggest installing it in a VM, but really it's up to you. LMDE is pretty much ready to use once you get it installed, meaning it comes with stuff you're likely going to need/want already installed (browser, music player, etc, etc).


Arch, really this suggestion is for if/when you feel comfortable with Linux as a whole and would like to move on to learning more about it. There is a pretty good install guide here on OCN, written by Shrak. Arch is more of a Linux how you want it. All that gets installed are the basics and then you choose what gets installed on top of that (DE, window managers, music player, brower, etc, etc). Even if you don't want to got through learning all the stuff required to using Arch, I highly recommend that you bookmark their wiki. The information there is invaluable and will apply to every distro.

Now that I have gotten the suggestions out of the way, I'm going to discuss some of your goals for Linux install. How light and fast it is, really depends on the DE that you use and all of the stuff that comes with it. Going with a lighter DE such as XFCE, as compared to KDE or Gnome, will be a little better. There are usually trade offs though so really the best way to find out what works best for you is to try more than one, which you can do with any distro. Another thing that you'll have to get used to is that when you want to install software, you don't need to go to a website and download it. Instead you'll use a package manager (either terminal or gui depending on how you want to do it) and it will download the the program from a repo and install it for you.

If you have any questions that Linux community here is pretty friendly so feel free to ask away.

What is a "DE?" I do want something fast, but not sure if I want it to minimal that I boot from a USB. I don't mind the OS taking up some space on the hard drive, and think I would rather have everything in one place anyway. I do realize though that my question is going to get answered by opinionated people, since everyone likes something different, but I kind of set it up that way... I want to hear what other people have good experiences with, and what is a solid, fast, and light OS. While I do want the ability to change my themes, and GUI, I don't care to have my desktop spinning on a cube or have the ability to show me multiple desktops, like on my phone.
As for WINE, is seems like that is simply an emulation for Windows, is that right? So technically, could I install a distro of Linux, and then just use WINE all the time? If that IS an emulation of Windows, why is it limited in compatibility of games and hardware?
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pestilaence View Post

What is a "DE?" I do want something fast, but not sure if I want it to minimal that I boot from a USB. While I do want the ability to change my themes, and GUI, I don't care to have my desktop spinning on a cube or have the ability to show me multiple desktops, like on my phone.

Sorry, I should have explained what a DE is, but I was rushing because I had get to a class. DE is short for Desktop Enviornment, basically think of it as everything after you log into Windows. It's the graphical part of the OS. They all come with a Window Manager which basically is the graphic part. Depending on the WM, there will be different features, the whole spinning cube thing or multiple desktops. Most of them also come with gui programs to get you up and running. Such as a gui file manager (explorer in windows), or a gui text editor. The heavier ones even come with other things like a music/video player, a custom web browser, etc. Since you want a light DE that doesn't have a lot of extra features, I suggest you look at XFCE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pestilaence View Post

I do want something fast, but not sure if I want it to minimal that I boot from a USB. I don't mind the OS taking up some space on the hard drive, and think I would rather have everything in one place anyway.

I suggested using a Live CD or a VM, because you said you didn't want to make the jump to installing it on the drive until you were sure everything would work. With a VM you can basically test drive the distro without installing it onto the drive and make sure that you can get your stuff working, and then you can make the jump to installing it onto the drive. It also helps because you can practice installing so that when it comes to installing to the drive you've done it all before.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pestilaence View Post

As for WINE, is seems like that is simply an emulation for Windows, is that right? So technically, could I install a distro of Linux, and then just use WINE all the time? If that IS an emulation of Windows, why is it limited in compatibility of games and hardware?

I have never used Wine but my understanding of it is that Wine doesn't emulate Windows perfectly and so the more complex the program (game vs. something simple like a text editor) the more extra work in the form of patches it needs to work properly. I think that those patches are written by the community so if no one really feels a need to patch Wine for a certain program then Wine never really works well with it.
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