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Gigabyte GA-F2A85X-UP4 or Asrock FM2A85X Extreme6

Poll Results: Gigabyte GA-F2A85X-UP4 or Asrock FM2A85X Extreme6

 
  • 66% (2)
    Gigabyte GA-F2A85X-UP4
  • 33% (1)
    Asrock FM2A85X Extreme6
3 Total Votes  
post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I'm looking for a motherboard for a new PC, I won't go in to the other details but I've decided to settle on a high end FM2 full ATX mobo and basically the two options here are the Gigabyte GA-F2A85X-UP4 and Asrock FM2A85X Extreme6. The AsRock actually ends up being slightly more expensive then the GB here and the GB will have better warranty support since the AsRock is being imported directly by a retailer. (The Asus F2A85-V PRO isn't available here in fact no ASUS full ATX, nor are the higher end Sapphire, BioStar or MSI and to be honest I don't really trust BioStar nor ECS. It's basically this or the Extreme4/D3H if I want a decent full ATX.)

In terms of feature set, the GB actually seems better except for the possibly weaker power design as it'll be more useful to have the extra PCI express 1x then the PCI (even with the limitations) and the better Realtek codec on the Asrock is likely to be unused since I'll be using HDMI audio I suspect. Plus dual BIOS is always nice even with the modern attempts to increase the chance of recovery from a BIOS flashing problem. (I don't think I'm like to use the IR or CIR on the AsRock board or the TPM on the GB board.)

But from reviews and a look at their BIOS updates, it seems to me that on the whole Asrock have the better BIOS support particularly when it comes to OCing and high speed (IMC OC) memory support even if the official support list for GB seems to list more options then the AsRock for high speed memory. At least AsRock seems to have a fair amount more BIOS updates relating to that whereas GB have been fairly quiet (unless they're just very bad at release notes). Although AsRock seem to have had some dumb limitations in their BIOS like the lack of IOMMU and >512MB shared memory support, I don't think it's just AsRock making up for lost ground. I may do some minor overclocking but I'm particularly interested in the high speed memory support.

Any opinions?

Cheers
post #2 of 5
If you look on these boards, many Asrock users on the A75 platform have had VRM (voltage regulator module) burnouts.

Both are 8+2 power phase but Gigabyte generally uses Digital VRM (The UP4 uses PowIRStage IC3550 that can handle 60AMps) and Asrock tends to go cheaper with Analog mosfets ... although this one is digital and actually pretty good (see http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/fullimage.php?image=49680 , http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/ASRock-FM2A85X-Extreme6-Motherboard/1649/6 and http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASRock/FM2A85X_Extreme6/5.html)

http://www.pctreiber.net/2013/asrock-fm2a85x-extreme6-test.html/2
Translated
Quote:
At the voltage converters ASRock uses eight phases for the power supply of the CPU as well as for the supply of two phases VDD_NB tarpaulin. Thereby, each phase of each of a coil, a high-side and low-side MOSFET, and with the label 4530CL 9230CL (Vendor NXP). To filter the respective voltages are 8 capacitors that are specified with 820 uF and 2.5 V, are available. Control vCore / VDD_NB voltage is via a IR3565A International Rectifier controller that is fully digital. It is interesting that this controller really only a 4 +2 phase design provides. On the back of the ASRock board uses four International Rectifier IR3598 Driver (PDF spec sheet), increasing the number of phases for the power to the CPU (Phase Doubler). This driver shares a PWM signal on two different Driver signals with which the MOSFETs are "supplied". Add two Chil CHL8510 Driver (PDF spec sheet) come for the two phases VDD_NB.

^ Basically it is actually 4 phases for CPU with doublers.

either one should get 4.5GHz on A10-5800k no problem but for the money, the Gigabyte board is much better
Edited by AlphaC - 3/25/13 at 5:04pm
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
I'm aware of the problems people have had with some Asrock A75 (is it actually multiple models, it wasn't entirely clear to me what from what I saw) but I haven't heard any of them with the A85 boards. (And all GB had their share of problems with other boards, I pretty much go by the theory for any manufacturers some of their products have abnormal problems. It's when the problems are not so abnormal that they become a concern. Of course having the problems occurred more recently is more concerning but the design seems different enough I'm hoping it's not a worry.)

And as you said the Asrock A75s have generally used analog power (but don't the GB A75s as well, they don't seem to mention digital unlike for the A85). (I thought the AsRock used digi PWM since their site says and I also saw various seemingly competent reviews mentioning including with photos of the chips.)

BTW are you sure the GB is 8+2? Most people seem to say it's 6+2 and Gigabyte don't say instead making a fuss about their 60A ferrite chokes. I just spent ages searching hence the long edit but I seem to recall some discussion about whether the power design was actually that great with some argument that even though it's supposed to be able to support more or the same despite having less power phases, it may still perform worse then a real 8+2. It could be a different mobo I'm thinking of hence the problems finding the discussion. In any case from the description of the design of the AsRock power circuitry, it sounds like it's even worse. (I actually thought AsRock was mildly better here before I read your post but was very unsure since it's something beyond most reviews and I didn't trust manufacturer PR either way.)

Anyway thanks, you've given me something to think about which I likely would never have found myself.
Edited by Nil Einne - 3/25/13 at 5:34pm
post #4 of 5
Got the 8+2 from http://www.overclock.net/t/946407/amd-motherboards-vrm-info-database

Unfortunately I don't know if they counted wrong or something.

The Gigabyte is stronger I'm sure. Even if it isn't phase-wise, the PowrIR phase is MUCH stronger than LF-PAK mosfets. The PowIR stuff is strong: http://www.irf.com/whats-new/nr110308.html

If I'm not mistaken, the NXP 9230CL mosfet is used on Asrock Z77 Pro3 and on ASUS P8Z77-V pro but not on their premium ROG stuff. The PowIR stage is used on high end $200+ Gigabyte boards such as the Z77X-UP4, Z77X-UP5 TH, Z77X-UP7.
See http://www.gigabyte.com/MicroSite/312/images/model.html


edit: see http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/amd_a_series_apu/3.htm
Quote:
Around the socket area we can see the 60 amp Power IR Stage IR3550 ICs from International Rectifier and 60 amp rated ferrite chokes. Basically it is a single package MOSFET design that runs much cooler than traditional MOSFETs and lower RDs MOSFETs.
Quote:
Like mentioned on the front of the box, the Gigabyte F2A85X-UP4 also has an overclocking-friendly VRM design; one that uses some of the most expensive components on the market to ensure you can deliver clean power to your delicate silicon. All International Rectifier parts shown above are on the IR3567A controller. The VRM itself is made up of many International Rectifier IR3550M PowerStages shown in the second image above.
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Gigabyte/F2A85X-UP4/5.html

"6+2" on http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Gigabyte-F2A85X-UP4-Motherboard/1680/
Quote:
IRStage IR3550 ICs, which we have detailed in previous reviews, are used and for a minor increase in cost we get a fewer phases rated at a higher amperage that due to their design should provide a higher efficiency and run cooler than the previous premium power delivery ICs. Whether that increased cost is justified on a platform such as Trinity could be debatable, but Gigabyte insist that at least the high end board in each platform should have something similar. To take credence with the efficiency, the F2A85X-UP4 system draws the least power in our at-the-wall power tests.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6511/gigabyte-f2a85xup4-review-are-powirstages-needed-with-trinity
Quote:
As the board comes out of the Ultra Durable 5 Series, which was introduced mid-year, it is focusing on premium IR3550 PowIRstage. Unlike ordinary MOSFET International Rectifier IC designs in which the high-side and low-side MOSFETs and the necessary Driver IC are integrated into a single component. This will substantially increase the efficiency of the solution significantly. Additionally the IR3550 PowIRstage up to 60A are designed. While the maximum current per component for the standard user rather plays a minor role, mainly offers increased efficiency advantages for the user. This should ensure a low temperature of VRMS and lower power consumption. These facts will be clarified in further testing. Besides the high quality ICs Gigabyte has designed the whole board to iron-core coils, and all-solid capacitors.

For the power supply of the components Gigabyte uses 6 phases for the CPU and 2 phases for the APU Northbridge (6 +2 phase). Another phase are both the memory and the chipset. The power supply of the CPU is thereby realized a IR3567A controller. This digital vCore controller from International Rectifier, the 6 +2 phases. Interesting for overclockers also the additional clock generator is installed on the board to Gigabyte. This will provide benefits when overclocking over the reference clock as the clock generator in A85X chipset very quickly "run out of steam". This should also be clarified in more detail
- http://www.pctreiber.net/2013/gigabyte-ga-f2a85x-up4-test.html/2

edit: As for your Gigabyte boards having problems, Gigabyte did a recall of X79 boards (http://www.techpowerup.com/157543/Gigabyte-Recalling-X79-UD3-UD5-G1.Assassin-2-Motherboards.html , http://www.vortez.net/articles_pages/gigabyte_x79_up4_review,1.html , http://www.techpowerup.com/157601/Gigabyte-Gives-Lifetime-Warranty-to-X79-Board-Corrective-BIOS-Users-Isolates-Problem.html) and people on this forum say that it still has issues. Go Asus/Asrock for X79
Edited by AlphaC - 3/25/13 at 6:15pm
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post #5 of 5

International Rectifier makes quality chips.
currently building a IR class D amp. very impressed with it.
very clean and runs cool. wish more mfg would use IR chips.
tangent done.
AK 1045
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
AMD Phenom II X6 1045T 95W TDP GABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P AM3/AM2+ AMD 790X+SB750 1... MSI Radeon 5850 PowerColor Radeon 5850 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Crucial Ballistix Tracer (D9GMH) PC2-6400 800MH... OCZ Agility 3 120GB RAID-0 Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 200GB Scythe Mugen 2 with dual Scythe SFF21F Fans (Pu... 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
ASUS VW266H Black 25.5" 2ms(GTG) 1920x1200 Corsair 750TX 750W  CM HAF932 Logitech G5 
AudioAudio
ASUS XONAR DG with Heaphone amp > Sennheiser HD... 2x100 watt Class D amp 2x100 watt > Miller & Kr... 
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AK 1045
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
AMD Phenom II X6 1045T 95W TDP GABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P AM3/AM2+ AMD 790X+SB750 1... MSI Radeon 5850 PowerColor Radeon 5850 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Crucial Ballistix Tracer (D9GMH) PC2-6400 800MH... OCZ Agility 3 120GB RAID-0 Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 200GB Scythe Mugen 2 with dual Scythe SFF21F Fans (Pu... 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
ASUS VW266H Black 25.5" 2ms(GTG) 1920x1200 Corsair 750TX 750W  CM HAF932 Logitech G5 
AudioAudio
ASUS XONAR DG with Heaphone amp > Sennheiser HD... 2x100 watt Class D amp 2x100 watt > Miller & Kr... 
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