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Intel Haswell - OCN Conjecture - Page 3

post #21 of 30
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Originally Posted by coolhandluke41 View Post

great thread OP ,well done thumb.gif
thanks bro... smile.gif
post #22 of 30
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Originally Posted by malmental View Post



Source of that picture? Seems to be June 2 is the magical date.
    
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post #23 of 30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lombax View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by malmental View Post



Source of that picture? Seems to be June 2 is the magical date.
Vortez
Intel Core "Haswell" Delayed till Computex 2013, No Show at CES
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post #24 of 30
Thread Starter 
Worth The Wait? Intel Haswell Processors Releasing in June - Techknowlogists.com
Quote:
After the significant performance leap taken by Intel by releasing their 2nd Generation i3, i5, and i7 (codenamed Sandy Bridge) produced a phenomenal turn of events when the 1st generation i7 processors; considered to be processing behemoths were easily dethroned by the more efficient, and less expensive Sandy Bridge i5 processors which obviously made it a no-brainer which item qualified as being the smarter purchase. Since then Intel has been on a rampage, going as much as to release the 3rd Gen (Ivy Bridge) processors in less than a year’s gap, though not many significant changes had taken place, resulting in disappointments for many enthusiasts. Are the 4th Gen Haswell processors going to share the same mirrored reaction as the Ivy Bridge or will things be any different. Lets have a look.

Changes and Updates:

For the tech savvy and the average user, the haswell processors are based on the 22 nm process (same as Ivy Bridge) though they have been marked as being more energy-efficient compared to their predecessor and will be targeted to both desktops and mobile based setups. Also it is said that these processors will be upto 10% faster than the Ivy Bridge processors which seems as a disappointment but based on pricing and the actual release of these processors, hopefully things will get different. Some users may not be to thrilled about this news because the new processors are based on a new socket, the LGA (Land Grid Array) 1150, which means that many users will have to make an extra purchase of a motherboard if they ever want to try out the new line-up of products. Also the integrated video controller, which is embedded onto the processor will be faster compared to the previous generation and will be called intel Haswell GT3 and they will be DirectX 11.1 and Open GL 4.0 compatible.

There is also something of note to be added here. Rumor has it that the voltage regulator, which are originally soldered onto the motherboard to allow bold users and overclockers to raise the voltage of the processor and increase its clock speed for extra performance, will instead be moved from the motherboard onto the processor itself. Being a hardware tweaker myself, yet always careful when delicate hardware is involved, it cannot yet be deduced whether or not this step by Intel is a wise decision to be made. Only future benchmarks and statistics that inevitably follow in the near future holds the answer to that. Another shocking rumor that has been molded is that the cpu will be embedded directly onto the motherboard so if during an unfortunate chain of events, the motherboard considered to be a vital and yet extremely fragile component of the entire system somehow fails, and not covered under RMA regulations, the customer will have to purchase another set of a cpu and motherboard, adding much to his frustration, Lets hope that during the launch these rumors are only rumors, because intel would not want to lose its’ market to rival competitor, AMD. The following desktop models will be available during the launch:

i7: 4770k, 4770, 4770s, 4770T, 4765T (Starting from highest performing)

i5: 4670k, 4670, 4670s, 4670T, 4570, 4570s, 4570T, 4330, 4330s (Starting from highest performing)

Now since the basic updates have been outlined as what we might expect, the only element that yet remains to unfold is time. So it is time that will tell whether these products serve to be purchased or that users will stick to their already existing platform.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by malmental View Post

yes it seems the TIM and overclocking / heat is the 'elephant in the room' that everyone wants info about.
imagine if getting 5.0GHz on air... one can only wish for now.

today looking for some release dates..

Yes one can only wish. I know it will happen for some, but it will be rare. I think that they would never release a chip like that on purpose because it is all about marketing. If the $340 chip can hit 5ghz on air then where is the market for the higher end and more expensive chips?
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by RavageTheEarth View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by malmental View Post

yes it seems the TIM and overclocking / heat is the 'elephant in the room' that everyone wants info about.
imagine if getting 5.0GHz on air... one can only wish for now.

today looking for some release dates..

Yes one can only wish. I know it will happen for some, but it will be rare. I think that they would never release a chip like that on purpose because it is all about marketing. If the $340 chip can hit 5ghz on air then where is the market for the higher end and more expensive chips?

It doesn't work like that. The design is done, it's fabbed, tested, mated with a pcb, tested again, tested some more, then shipped. At no point does anyone say "this chip operates too well, let's cripple it".
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr/owned View Post

It doesn't work like that. The design is done, it's fabbed, tested, mated with a pcb, tested again, tested some more, then shipped. At no point does anyone say "this chip operates too well, let's cripple it".

They would be very silly if they didn't operate like that.

Cutting features on lower-end chips, killing cores etc. is common practice.
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post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by NihilOC View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr/owned View Post

It doesn't work like that. The design is done, it's fabbed, tested, mated with a pcb, tested again, tested some more, then shipped. At no point does anyone say "this chip operates too well, let's cripple it".

They would be very silly if they didn't operate like that.

Cutting features on lower-end chips, killing cores etc. is common practice.

Because those features were dead or wounded anyways (of course there's the chance you get a 3770k downbinned to a 3570k to meet market demand). The implication above was that there's some sort of scheme to limit the speed of chips to prevent 5 Ghz or more. There isn't. The chip obviously isn't designed with 5 Ghz in mind, however.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr/owned View Post

Because those features were dead or wounded anyways (of course there's the chance you get a 3770k downbinned to a 3570k to meet market demand). The implication above was that there's some sort of scheme to limit the speed of chips to prevent 5 Ghz or more. There isn't. The chip obviously isn't designed with 5 Ghz in mind, however.

Oh yes, I'd certainly agree they don't intentionally limit the chips in that way. Not on the k-series anyway.

But they certainly selectively disable features etc. purely to stop chips competing with their higher priced counterparts.

You can put some things like disabled cores down to binning or thermal limits, but hyper-threading, tsx etc? Sorry I cannot look up better examples at the moment (I'm currently on my phone), but I'm sure you get what I mean.

Sometimes features are omitted purely to justify the higher price of products with those features, and sometimes they're omitted to stop them competing with higher end products. As I suspect is the case with the 4770k and TSX.
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post #30 of 30
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IB-E Update..
Quote:
Intel Will Allegedly Release Three Ivy Bridge-E Processors Later This Year
Quote:
Many enthusiasts have been eagerly awaiting the next generation of Intel processors to use LGA 2011, which is supposed to be Ivy Bridge-E. Especially after seeing rumors of a 10 core Xeon E5-2600 V2 Ivy Bridge-EP CPU, I think many users expected at least an eight core Ivy Bridge-E part.

Unfortunately, if a slide posted by VR-Zone China is any indication, LGA 2011 users will not be getting an eight core processor any time soon. The slide suggests that Intel will release three new Ivy Bridge-E CPUs in the third quarter of this year (Q3'13). However, the top-end part is merely a six core CPU with slight improvements over the existing Sandy Bridge-E 3960X chip.

Ivy20Bridge-E20Lineup_zpsa1b69b5e.png

Specifically, the slide alleges that the initial Intel release will include the Core i7 4820, Core i7 4930K, and the Core i7 4960X. An Ivy Bridge-E equivalent to the SB-E 3970X is noticeably absent from the lineup along with several of the other rumored (higher core count) chips.

Untitled_zps1b61f8be.png

All of the chips allegedly have 130W TDPs, 40 PCI-E 3.0 lanes, support for quad-channel DDR3-1866 memory, and are built on Intel's 22nm manufacturing process. The low end i7 4820 is a quad core chip clocked at 3.7 GHz base and 3.9 GHz turbo with 10MB L3 cache. The i7 4930K is an unlocked six core part with 12MB L3 cache and clockspeeds of 3.4 GHz base and 3.9 GHz turbo. Finally, the Core i7 4960X is rumored to be the highest-end chip Intel will release (at least, initially). It is also a six core part clocked at 3.6 GHz base and 4 GHz turbo. It has 15MB of L3 cache. These chips are the Ivy Bridge-E equivalents to the 3820, 3930K, and 3960X chips respectively. The new processors feature higher clockspeeds, and are based on 22nm 3D transistor technology instead of SB-E's 32nm manufacturing process. Curiously, the TDP ratings are the same, however. That suggests that the move to 22nm did not net Intel much TDP headroom, and the higher clocks are bringing them up to similar TDP numbers. At least the TDP ratings are not higher than SB-E, such that you motherboard and HSF should have no problems accepting an IVB-E CPU upgrade (with a BIOS update, of course).

It will be interesting to see how the new Ivy Bridge-E chips stack up, especially considering Intel may also be unveiling the consumer-grade Haswell processor this year. On one hand, Ivy Bridge-E offers up a CPU upgrade path for existing systems, but on the other hand pricing and the performance of Haswell (and lack of higher core count Ivy Bridge-E chips like previous rumors suggested) may see enthusiasts instead opt for a motherboard+CPU overhaul instead of simply recycling the LGA 2011/X79 motherboard. At this point, if this new slide holds true it appears that Ivy Bridge E/LGA 2011 will become even more of a niche solely for workstations that need the extra PCI-E lanes and quad channel memory. I say this as someone running a Lynnfield system who is itching for an upgrade and torn on going for the enthusiast platform or waiting for Haswell.

What do you think about the rumored Ivy Bridge-E chips, are they what you expected? Do you think they will be worth a CPU upgrade for your LGA 2011-based system or are you leaning towards Haswell?
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