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[CNET] Apple's iMessage encryption trips up feds' surveillance - Page 3

post #21 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcguru000 View Post

This is what they want you to think... if it can be encrypted it can be decrypted... this just looks like another apple-paid-off document imo... even if they claim it is "internal" ...

Just like games get "leaked" and movie trailers "accidentally air early" ... it's more behind the scenes money pushing and marketing.


Not sure why it matters anyway- the law doesn't need to "intercept" messages... they can just confiscate your phone and computer... heck, your whole house and car if they think you're up to no good they'll surely find away.

thumb.gif
Exactly.
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post #22 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachmark2 View Post

If Apple came up with the encryption algorithm: Rock on guys! Make an even stronger one. Keep up the good work.

If someone else came up with the algorithm and Apple licenses it: Rock on inventors! Keep up the good work. Good job for adopting this Apple.
Some of the biggest rules in computer science: Don't make your own crypto library and Don't make your own time library (unless you absolutely have to). There is a reason they exist already and there is a reason there aren't a multitude of different crypto and time libraries available.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubers View Post

Who'd Apple buy for this?
Most likely, no one. They used an already available crypto library and the encryption method appears the be one that the DEA can't easily break.
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post #23 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pheatton View Post

Give them time, they will find a way to break the encryption eventually. Besides the DEA, FBI or CIA aren't the organizations that would be working to break the encryption anyway, that job would fall the the NSA and the they are VERY good at this sort of thing.

Key word is eventually. How long has Truecrypt been around without being cracked yet?
    
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post #24 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by PostalTwinkie View Post

For the average user, and person being tracked/prosecuted, the NSA isn't of much worry. Everything is a business, and resources and cost factor into everything. If some DA is going after some local drug dealer, they aren't going to get the NSA involved in order to break the Encryption.

Encryption is like a pad lock on a bike....

It doesn't need to be unbreakable, just stronger than the one on the bike next to yours.

Correct sir, just wanted to drop some info in there.
post #25 of 122
Thread Starter 
Quote:
That's like saying quantum tunnelling of a human being through a brick wall is possible with enough time. Sure, it's possible... but it's virtually impossible due to the power and time required.

That's also not true. There have been cases where FBI cannot unlock a password protected drive.

Android open source also allows more eyes to look at the code..... Apple has dropped the ball on user data quite a few times in the last few years.

Ugh are you seriously comparing breaking encryption to quantum tunneling? Is this dude serious right now?

You need to read more. Your post is nothing short of blatant misinformation. You can start here: http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/
Quote:
Is that a technical term? The Android Marketplace may have more malware... but I trust the open-souce OS more than a closed-source OS.

Lol...

http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/technolog/hacked-sites-spread-malware-android-smartphones-753458

Android app security holes have long been a concern because of the mobile operating system's more open architecture and the app market's less stringent standards for developers than others such as Apple's iOS or Research In Motion's BlackBerry OS.

It may not have worked in the latest examples, with 17 "bad mobile apps," and 700,000 downloads of those apps, as of May 3, Trend Micro said.

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-03-08/business/37554452_1_android-phones-malware-malicious-apps

Nearly 80 percent of all mobile malware found in 2012 was written for phones running Google’s mobile Android operating system, according to a report from security firm F-Secure.

Android is the world’s most popular smartphone platform — with nearly 70 percent of the market, according to numbers posted in January by Strategy Analytics.

False sense of security, much? I work for IT security. I'm pretty sure I consider myself an authority of what is considered secure and not secure. Android platform is anything but secure. Especially when noob users go randomly download packages from 'developers' around the internet. Almost none of you actually go through the code nor have access to it. Lets stop pretending you guys are more 'leet' than Apple users. Following tutorials on XDA is not 'leet'.


It's funny to see Android users have such a false sense of security because their OS is open source. Apples to oranges.
post #26 of 122
it's pretty well known that android is less secure. that's probably one of the reasons business are adopting ios en masse. ios is the new blackberry, and blackberry is screwed.

not an ios fanboy, i own an evo 3d.
post #27 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by j3st3r View Post

Ugh are you seriously comparing breaking encryption to quantum tunneling? Is this dude serious right now?

You need to read more. Your post is nothing short of blatant misinformation. You can start here: http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/
Lol...

http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/technolog/hacked-sites-spread-malware-android-smartphones-753458

Android app security holes have long been a concern because of the mobile operating system's more open architecture and the app market's less stringent standards for developers than others such as Apple's iOS or Research In Motion's BlackBerry OS.

It may not have worked in the latest examples, with 17 "bad mobile apps," and 700,000 downloads of those apps, as of May 3, Trend Micro said.

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-03-08/business/37554452_1_android-phones-malware-malicious-apps

Nearly 80 percent of all mobile malware found in 2012 was written for phones running Google’s mobile Android operating system, according to a report from security firm F-Secure.

Android is the world’s most popular smartphone platform — with nearly 70 percent of the market, according to numbers posted in January by Strategy Analytics.

You can't in one breath say that Android is the world's most popular smartphone platform and expect it to not be a primary target for malware ... look at Windows ... Anyway, this is all off-topic. This thread isn't about malware.

I do agree that generally, if it can be encrypted, it can be decrypted. The point of encryption is to make it not worth the time/resources for whoever your attacker is.
If you're dealing with an armature, basic encryption classes are fine for a lot of uses. For something like iMessage, the last thing Apple wants is for anyone who took Crypto in school to be sitting in starbucks and intercepting their messages; of course it'll be a tough one. I do want to see someone get bored and try to come up with a decryption algorithm though... just for fun ...
Quote:

False sense of security, much? I work for IT security. I'm pretty sure I consider myself an authority of what is considered secure and not secure. Android platform is anything but secure. Especially when noob users go randomly download packages from 'developers' around the internet. Almost none of you actually go through the code nor have access to it. Lets stop pretending you guys are more 'leet' than Apple users. Following tutorials on XDA is not 'leet'.
The fact that you consider yourself an authority doesn't mean you are one smile.gif.
Quote:
It's funny to see Android users have such a false sense of security because their OS is open source. Apples to Androids.
FTFY tongue.gif

Anyway, the thread's focus is on encryption so let's keep it that way ... this isn't for debating malware issues.
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post #28 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcguru000 View Post

This is what they want you to think... if it can be encrypted it can be decrypted... this just looks like another apple-paid-off document imo... even if they claim it is "internal" ...

Just like games get "leaked" and movie trailers "accidentally air early" ... it's more behind the scenes money pushing and marketing.


Not sure why it matters anyway- the law doesn't need to "intercept" messages... they can just confiscate your phone and computer... heck, your whole house and car if they think you're up to no good they'll surely find away.

Couldn't agree more
post #29 of 122
You know guys, it's kind of sad for people to use this as an opportunity to back their chosen tech company, when you realize right there the headline is basically saying "it's irresponsible to let consumers share private data."

Poor world...
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post #30 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schoat333 View Post

Please tell me this was a joke, and your not that misinformed? How many Android phone owners do you know that have had malware? I've owned many different Android devices over the past 4 years, and never had malware. Nor has anyone I know personally, or in the forums that I'm a part of.

When you don't download applications directly from the playstore, For example 4shared, you can get a bunch of malware.
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