Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › FreeBSD on desktop?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

FreeBSD on desktop?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for a *nix to install on a spare machine, but I want to try something different so I'm probably not going with Debian as I already have it on my workstation. Now I just can't muster enough interest in any other Linux distros (I was thinking of trying Arch again but I'd really prefer something boring and stable), and looking through distrowatch I realised FreeBSD ranks pretty high and I've never actually tried any of the BSDs (or for that matter any non-Linux *nix). How's it for a desktop OS? Any gotchas I should look for coming from Linux? I've always been under the impression that it's more of a server OS, and opinions I dug up with google don't exactly inspire confidence, but I feel like playing around a little.
post #2 of 5
I honestly prefer OpenBSD, though FreeBSD is a bit better for desktop use due to being more up to date on things along with more packages.Whereas OpenBSD is security and stability oriented, so things are a bit slower paced. FreeBSD is a great place to start in the BSD world smile.gif

Just make sure to give the handbook a over. It's packed with tons of information. here
post #3 of 5
gotchyas? you have to add hal and dbus to rc.conf manually. that got me stuck for about half an hour. Once you know it takes 5 seconds. nano isn't in the default install. All I can really think of
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrl1357 View Post

gotchyas? you have to add hal and dbus to rc.conf manually. that got me stuck for about half an hour. Once you know it takes 5 seconds. nano isn't in the default install. All I can really think of

Pretty basic stuff coming from Arch ( before systemd ) tongue.gif
post #5 of 5
I was busy documenting my combined htpc/fileserver setup (ZFS storage, XBMC, jails, Samba, sickbeard) to share on these forums. However I been having issues with a recent version of webcamd which is required for IR remote control, so i put the article on hold. Ironically 3 years ago I was thinking to myself how configuring IR in FreeBSD was so much more simple than it was in Arch. So either they broke something in the new version or I'm getting stupid with age. I'm hoping it's the former.

Anyway here is part of the doco that is relevant to building a freebsd desktop that may be useful to you. Note while the steps are very accurate, the doco hasn't been edited for publishing for a user friendly audience.

=====PC-BSD Installer=====

- English
- Select FreeBSD Server
- Wizard, root password, create xbmc user (/bin/sh), hostname (tick remote SSH), Network config (static), Install system src (leave install ports tree unticked), Finish
- Careful not to proceed without Disk Selection Customize, Advanced, Selected Disk (pick), Selected Partition (use entire disk) + Partition with GPT; ZFS + Install bootable MBR; Enable ZFS mirror/raidz mode, no encryption, next, Finish.
- Proceed with install

reboot

=====First boot=====

Login as root.

Update the base system
Code:
freebsd-update fetch
freebsd-update install

Set clang as your default compiler (This step is not required for FreeBSD 10)

Edit /etc/make.conf
Code:
CC=clang
CXX=clang++
CPP=clang-cpp
#WITH_PKGNG=yes  # This is hashed because PKGNG is not online yet.

#Convert the package database to pkgng (This step is not required for FreeBSD 10)
Code:
#/usr/sbin/pkg   # answer yes  # hashed because PKGNG is not online yet

Download the ports tree
Code:
portsnap fetch extract

Add the following line to roots .cshrc file in /root and relog. Replace with your local mirror
Code:
setenv PACKAGESITE http://mirror.internode.on.net/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9-stable/Latest/

Install portmaster
Code:
pkg_add -r portmaster   # ignore the pkgng message

You can do all of this configuration remotely by sshing into this box, so install tmux.
Code:
pkg_add -r tmux

Install X11
Code:
pkg_add -r xorg-minimal
pkg_add -r xterm

Enable hald and dbus in /etc/rc.conf
Code:
hald_enable="YES"
dbus_enable="YES"

Start hald and dbus
Code:
/usr/local/etc/rc.d/hald start
/usr/local/etc/rc.d/dbus start

Linux compatibility is a prereq for nvidia drivers.
Code:
kldload linux

Add the following line into /etc/rc.conf
Code:
linux_enable="YES"

Install Linux libraries
Code:
pkg_add -r linux_base-f10

Add the following entry into /etc/fstab
Code:
linproc         /compat/linux/proc      linprocfs       rw      0       0

Mount Linux proc
Code:
mount /compat/linux/proc

Install nvidia drivers
Code:
pkg_add -r nvidia-driver
kldload nvidia

Add the following line to /boot/loader.conf
Code:
nvidia_load="YES"

Add nvidia utilities
Code:
pkg_add -r nvidia-settings
pkg_add -r nvidia-xconfig

Run nvidia configurator
Code:
nvidia-xconfig

Install fluxbox
Code:
portmaster x11-wm/fluxbox

Test Fluxbox
Code:
su - xbmc
echo "/usr/local/bin/startfluxbox" >> ~/.xinitrc

Start Fluxbox
Code:
startx

The rest of the document then goes on about lirc config, auto booting FreeBSD straight into XBMC as the xbmc user, configuring shutdown and reboots through XBMC menu. Configure a ZFS storage pool and install a jail on it, install and configure samba, sabnzbd, sickbeard etc.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Linux, Unix
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › FreeBSD on desktop?