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P8Z68-V PRO, RAM MHz frequency Limits HELP! - Page 2

post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thank YOU! 1866 will be biggrin.gif
post #12 of 24
That is why I buy the exact ram that I want. If I want 2133 then that's what I buy. It has already been optimized for that speed. I don't need to waste a lot of time trying for a higher clock. When I have it installed then I might try to lower the latencies a little to speed it up but I already know that it will work at 2133. That is the main thing. Lower latencies will depend on the batch of ram that you get. Some will be very good and will except a lower setting while some do not give you much of a difference. The price savings is not worth the time it takes to tweak it. Spend the little extra and you will get 2133 guaranteed. Lower latencies can make them a little faster but the gain is generally not worth the effort.
post #13 of 24
I looked at the Dominator Platinum series and I think they are very overpriced. When I compare them to an equivalent G.Skill set which is 1/2 the price the clock timings don't justify the price. Not even close. For 1 lower latency number they charge you double the price for it. In almost any application you use be it heavy rendering or gaming you wouldn't even see the difference because most of these games are designed to run on as many systems as possible. They will never utilize 32GB or even 1/2 that. Now if you are using the Adobe Master collection to it's maximum then the speed isn't as important as the amount. Most rendering is mostly GPU and ram size intense. I would save my money on the ram and put it into the video card instead. Buy the almost as good G.Skill version for 1/2 the price. Then buy a bigger and faster SSD drive with the money. I was shocked when I saw the prices for the Dominator's. I thought there must be a reason for it so I checked the timing settings and the very slight advantage is not worth the cost. Sure go out and buy a McClaren for 1.5 million but what good is it if you can't utilize the speeds anywhere except on the track. That's the same with the ram your thinking of getting. None of the games will even register the difference unless you are on a dedicated network playing in some big warehouse setup for a gaming competition. Your internet speed will cut you down long before your hardware ever reaches peak speeds.
Edited by Twotenths - 4/30/13 at 10:01pm
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotenths View Post

That is why I buy the exact ram that I want. If I want 2133 then that's what I buy. It has already been optimized for that speed. I don't need to waste a lot of time trying for a higher clock. When I have it installed then I might try to lower the latencies a little to speed it up but I already know that it will work at 2133. That is the main thing. Lower latencies will depend on the batch of ram that you get. Some will be very good and will except a lower setting while some do not give you much of a difference. The price savings is not worth the time it takes to tweak it. Spend the little extra and you will get 2133 guaranteed. Lower latencies can make them a little faster but the gain is generally not worth the effort.

But at specifications it says 2133 OC:

"4 x DIMM, Max. 32GB, DDR3 2200(O.C.)/2133(O.C.)/1866(O.C.)/1600/1333/1066 MHz"
Due to CPU behavior, DDR3 2200/2000/1800 MHz memory module will run at DDR3 2133/1866/1600 MHz frequency as default
Or I can buy 2133 stock and will run for sure at 2133 mb? aaa I got it now, I can overclock till 2133 the lower ones or I can use stock 2200 and will be at 2133 wink.gif thx!
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotenths View Post

I looked at the Dominator Platinum series and I think they are very overpriced. When I compare them to an equivalent G.Skill set which is 1/2 the price the clock timings don't justify the price. Not even close. For 1 lower latency number they charge you double the price for it. In almost any application you use be it heavy rendering or gaming you wouldn't even see the difference because most of these games are designed to run on as many systems as possible. They will never utilize 32GB or even 1/2 that. Now if you are using the Adobe Master collection to it's maximum then the speed isn't as important as the amount. Most rendering is mostly GPU and ram size intense. I would save my money on the ram and put it into the video card instead. Buy the almost as good G.Skill version for 1/2 the price. Then buy a bigger and faster SSD drive with the money. I was shocked when I saw the prices for the Dominator's. I thought there must be a reason for it so I checked the timing settings and the very slight advantage is not worth the cost. Sure go out and buy a McClaren for 1.5 million but what good is it if you can't utilize the speeds anywhere except on the track. That's the same with the ram your thinking of getting. None of the games will even register the difference unless you are on a dedicated network playing in some big warehouse setup for a gaming competition. Your internet speed will cut you down long before your hardware ever reaches peak speeds.

I want to buy the best ram for the ramdisk I want to make and run windows and mac os from it as I want to buy 64 gb of ram, I had a good offer with 100 dollars cheaper than normal price 32gb at 1866 the ram was used only 3 months, so it is a good deal I think, and again I saw this stats:

for best value ram: http://www.overclock.net/t/1326571/ram-kit-value
for best performance: http://www.overclock.net/t/1326564/ram-kit-performance

and look at best performance big voting on the corsair and big diference between all, also G skill did not make it in the poll for the performance biggrin.gif so I am a bit confused.

Another thing regarding the ram cache for the raid arrays you use, now I don't have all hdds for the raid arrays I want to make, I was wondering if I can still use the ram cache for ahci ssd/hdd as buffer, same thing like u have in raid but only in ahci, can it work? lets say I have 4 gb to spare 2gb for 1ssd and 2gb for 1hdd something like that.
Edited by Catalin - 5/1/13 at 2:49pm
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catalin View Post

I want to buy the best ram for the ramdisk I want to make and run windows and mac os from it as I want to buy 64 gb of ram, I had a good offer with 100 dollars cheaper than normal price 32gb at 1866 the ram was used only 3 months, so it is a good deal I think, and again I saw this stats:

for best value ram: http://www.overclock.net/t/1326571/ram-kit-value
for best performance: http://www.overclock.net/t/1326564/ram-kit-performance

and look at best performance big voting on the corsair and big diference between all, also G skill did not make it in the poll for the performance biggrin.gif so I am a bit confused.

Another thing regarding the ram cache for the raid arrays you use, now I don't have all hdds for the raid arrays I want to make, I was wondering if I can still use the ram cache for ahci ssd/hdd as buffer, same thing like u have in raid but only in ahci, can it work? lets say I have 4 gb to spare 2gb for 1ssd and 2gb for 1hdd something like that.

I have 3 different sets of G.Skill 64GB @2400 Ram. The first is a set of TridentX which are actually dual core optimized but work no problems on my RIVE M/B. The second set is the RipjawsX @ 2400 and the RipjawsZ @ 2400. I am using the ASRock X79 E11 M/B and I was having problems getting it to run at speed with 2400 Ram. It would see it and I could save it at that speed in the bios but when I went back into the bios it always defaulted back to 2133. It is very unusual for G.Skill Ram and I found out that when I put the ram in my RIVE M/B it worked fine so I took screen shots of the settings that were on that board. I did the same for both sets of Ripjaws. I then put the ram back into the ASRock M/B and manually set the ram to the screen shot settings. They both work perfectly @2400 now. I have used the same ram on many builds for other people and this was the first time that this happened. It has something to do specifically with the ASRock board only. I have checked out all the timings on the Platinums vs G.Skill and they are the same. The only difference is the price. My RipjawsZ set cost me roughly $750 while the same Platinums cost $1200.00. I have never had any G.Skill ram modules fail. I use them mainly because they are one of the very few that offer 2400+ in 8GB sticks. Patriot offers maximum 2133 and they have 1 set that is dual channel only @ 2400. Crucial offers 1866 only and most of them are 4GB sticks. Any 8GB sticks are dual channel optimized. You can use dual channel in your system but there may be a little degradation in speed when tested. Only Corsair and G.Skill offer Quad channel kits @2400+. Corsair has the Brand name notoriety and people just flock to it because it may be more widely available depending on where you live. The name has been around much longer than G.Skill and they offer more than just Ram. They have cornered the closed waterblock cooling units market and some other markets as well. That makes them more popular while G.Skill basically only sells ram modules. I would gladly buy G.Skill rather than the overpriced Corsair ram any day.
Very Important about SSD caching
Never cache your SSD or Main C:\ drive. Windows updates will become corrupted when installing using a cache in that way. Only cache your other drives. Put the largest amount of cache on your linked drive. It will speed up the file transfers between the 2. This is the ultimate way to use it. Your SSD can handle things on it's own very fast but the boost needs to be on the linked drive foremost. That way when you save large files it will be on the linked drive and be very quick to finish. On occasion I have moved my video folder which contains 500GB of material. Your cache will only be quick until the set size is populated then it slows right down to actual drive speed for the rest. So if you create a 32GB cache on the linked drive then files up to 32GB will move quickly and be done as fast as the SSD can transfer it. Your ram is 10x faster than your SSD so that will be the speed value being set. Your SSD can read approx @ 500MB/s give or take depending on which SSD you have. Your ram can handle 10x that speed. Look at the largest file you have and think that you want to move 10 of them at the same time. That should be you cache size for the linked drive. Most 1080P videos are 4GB unless you are storing complete 2 hour long BluRay movies then they will be much bigger. You can change the cache size any time you want for any drive. If you want to move a large file from 1 HDD to another HDD then make the cache equal size on both HDD's for the transfer. It will happen quickly but remember that it is running in the background at normal drive speed so don't shut your computer off while it's still moving the file. You will lose whatever didn't get transferred as soon as the ram shuts down.
You can run a Ram Cache on any drive or Array that you want. You will need software to accomplish it though. I am using SuperCache5 software. I have run some extensive tests using it to see how it works and what the advantages are. When you load the Supercache program you can create multiple caches for different drives. It all comes down to where to use the cache for the best advantage and how big you make it. I have a drive that is fully linked to my SSD drive. Everything I download or save and put in my "Documents, Pictures, Videos, Downloads, and Desktop" folders all actually reside on my HDD not on my SSD. SDD space is too valuable to waste on storage of any kind. There are ways to maximize your SSD so that you aren't wasting space on your SSD. First of all disable hiberfil.sys. This is a file that is equal in size to your ram. It's only function is to store whatever resides in your ran when you system hibernates. This function should be disabled to make your SSD last longer. To do this open the CMD prompt window with administrator's rights. Type in "cd\" hit enter. Then type in " powercfg -h off " this will only work running as administrator. Second thing I do is modify the recycle bin size. Right click on recycle bin and make your SSD or C: drive 4096MB and change your linked drive by adding what you took off the C: drive to it. I use the same principle when I change the page file size. For quicker access I usually right click on the main screen and go to personalize. I look for desktop icons and add the user folder to the desktop. You can add others if you want but for this exercise we'll just stick to User Folder. Apply and ok until your back on your desktop. You will now see a folder which has all your saved file options in it. Double click on it to see all the folders. There are various ways to do this. When I build a system for a family I will purposely change the drive letter of the drive I want to link to the letter Z:. You can do this in drive manager. The reason why I pick Z is because every time you plug in another drive or flash drive Windows will automatically designate a drive letter for it. Picking Z means that you need to have 24 drives installed before it reaches Z so that means Windows will never change it and it is easy to find and locate. Most of the computers I build are for family use and everyone has access to it. To prevent the kids from playing with folders they shouldn't touch I create a folder named C on the Z: drive. I then change the folder icon to a red exclamation mark. This does not look like any normal folder and they won't recognize that it is a folder at all. I then go back to my user folder and when I right click on i.e. Documents scroll down to properties. There will be a box with the folder name. I copy the text and then look for the location tab. Click on Move. When the box come up scroll down the left window pane and find drive Z: click on Z and then double click on the exclamation mark folder. Once inside create a new folder and when it comes up paste what you copied into the folder name. Click on the page beside it so that the folder is created with that name in it. click once on the folder to highlight it and then save it. It will move the Documents folder there. A box will pop up telling you that there are files that you are attempting to move within the folder. Say yes or ok and let those files move to the new location. Do the same process for every folder I listed above in red.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catalin View Post

I want to buy the best ram for the ramdisk I want to make and run windows and Mac OS from it as I want to buy 64 gb of ram, I had a good offer with 100 dollars cheaper than normal price 32gb at 1866 the ram was used only 3 months, so it is a good deal I think, and again I saw this stats:

My son uses Mac systems and they are very particular in what hardware will work on their OS. My son wants to build a Hacintosh and you can only use components that they are or have used in their systems. Buying anything they have not used will not work in your system. Most of their motherboards are Gigabyte boards and you need to buy the specific ones that they have used. That goes for the video cards as well. Check out http://www.tonymacx86.com/home.php to find out what other people have used and were successful using. Windows is created to work using almost any hardware that there is and will work using endless variations or combinations of them. Mac is a whole different thing altogether. It is created using only specified hardware. If they haven't used that hardware chances are it won't work on yours either. That is why their OS is so cheap to buy. They don't have to deal with umpteen million variations but have instead tailored the OS to work on very specific hardware. That is why people like Mac systems. They customize the software to provide support for an excellent combination of pre-configured and fully tested hardware. Windows has to support so many combinations that it loses something in the translation trying to support everything out there. Macs don't have to deal with that. If you plan to run Mac OS then you will have to be very picky on your hardware decisions for it to work. It's not like Windows is in any sense of the word. Check out the link I've posted for more information about it. You have entered a different realm using any Mac OS platform. If you stray from their hardware support it probably won't work. You will need to find out a lot more about the Mac's before you begin. I sent my son a pair of AMD 6950's and they are not on their hardware list so they won't work. They have used the 6970's so they will support them but the 6950's your out of luck there. When my son started to realize what he was getting into he (ALTHOUGH HE LOVES THE MAC SYSTEM) relegated himself to building a regular PC instead. Finding the right hardware can be problematic because some of the hardware is no longer being sold any longer. Macs work so well because the hardware is 2 years old before they build with it. It takes that long to make sure it's a perfect match for the best performance. All the hardware is rigorously tested to make sure it optimizes their OS in the best possible way. In that way you never have system crashes or any glitches. That's why Macs are so dependable. It may be 2 year old hardware but they have tweaked it perfectly. They get every possible detail taken care of right down to drivers only suitable for Mac systems. All the drivers are customized for the hardware they work on. You can't just go to Gigabyte and download any driver. It has to be Mac specific drivers. They have started to make a few changes so that you can run Windows on their systems but not the other way around.
post #18 of 24
Thread Starter 
Hey thx for your answers!

Well I don't want to make ssd cache for my hdd, I want to make ssd cache with ramdisk and hdd cache with ramdisk, independently without raid for the moment, but I already understanded how with that software wink.gif

As for Mac OS, my configuration already worked with Mac OS, I already read 2-3 weeks on insane and tony mac forums regarding the hackingtosh so this I already know but thanks for telling me again all this, also seems you know better about mac os, since an older version of mac os, you can`t anymore run mac os from a ramdisk, they removed that future, but others say it can be done like in windows with a program and some tweaks modifications to copy all ur os into ramdisk before and after reboot to copy back etc, do you have any exact details or can you research a bit to see how to do this on mac os? on win I already know how chek here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDW0pGmhU9Y , I also find for mac this http://appducate.com/2013/02/duplicate-your-mac-with-carbon-copy-cloner/#bootfromusb can it work? thx!
Edited by Catalin - 5/8/13 at 2:43pm
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catalin View Post

Hey thx for your answers!

Well I don't want to make ssd cache for my hdd, I want to make ssd cache with ramdisk and hdd cache with ramdisk, independently without raid for the moment, but I already understanded how with that software wink.gif

Ramdisk and cache are the same thing technically. They both use ram memory. You cannot create a cache from your SSD or from your HDD unless you create a separate partition. You would load the Mac OS onto the partition to create dual bootable drives. When Windows does an update you normally need to restart the system. You will notice that Windows pauses on exit and loads around 30% of the changes at that point. Then the reboot happens and it will load the rest. If you were running a cache on the SSD then when the reboot happens the data waiting to continue loading will be erased because the ram is flushed on reboot. That is why you cannot cache your C:\ drive.
There is no advantage to creating a cache for a RamDisk. They both run at the same speed so it will be redundant and wasting your ram. Your ramdisk already runs at ram speeds. The main reason for a cache is to improve HDD speeds to match your SSD speeds. Don't cache your SSD or your ramdisk. Both are counterproductive and wasting your ram. The company that sells ram caching software advises that you not cache your SSD C:\ Drive. They have been having reports of problems when Windows does updates. Your SSD is plenty fast enough. I raided 2 SSD's together and the maximum you will achieve is the maximum that your Sata3 bus can take which is 768MB/s. That's only 30% faster than a stand alone drive and you can't go any faster. It is a waste of performance because If you were to just put 2 of them as stand alone then you will reap the benefits of having 2 drives running around 500MB/s each. Cache your hard drives especially the linked drive where you store all your saved files and data. You want the HDD's to handle SSD drive speeds. The cache will do that for you up to the designated cache size. Sata 3 -6Gb/s = 6Gigabits/s x 1024 = 6144Megabits/s divide by 8 (8 bits in a Byte) = 768MegaBytes/s That is as fast as the ports can run.
Now if you were to create a RamDisk using software it will create the size you set it to. It will then format the drive to NTFS. When you use the software then there are some folders already installed that when you shut down will automatically write the RamDisk data to your C:\ drive and reload it on boot. The danger in this is if you have a power interruption. If the power shuts down for any reason you will lose everything on the RamDisk. It is ram and is designed to flush itself when powered down. Your load times and your shut down time will increase very noticeably. It may take 3 minutes or more to shut down depending on the amount of data stored in the ram. This is also why Mac removed the feature. It is volatile when power is interrupted.
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
Okay thank you for clearing this out for me! but on mac os at least, I have seen you can put your mac os on a stick and boot from the styck, so if any updates are needed they can apply on the stick mode boot and than move the os from styck to ram again wouldn`t this work? I don't know for windows if the styck mode will work, but im sure it can be done. so if only the updates thing stop users from running the win and mac os totally from ram maybe the stick mode or when you see updates coming, move the os to another hard drive apply the updates there, reboot, than move the os back to ram, I think you understand what I try to say, so wouldn't this work?
Edited by Catalin - 5/11/13 at 1:31am
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