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Laptop Start up issues

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Hey guys

So recently my work laptop has started giving me some serious trouble. It's an HP pavilion dv-6 (sig rig). So here goes:

I wasn't having any issues with it as such, it was working perfectly, it's moderately old now (Bought it in Dec 2011). Couple days back, after I got back from work and decided to turn on my laptop, it took an unusual amount of time to start up. (8-9 mins till I can actually use it properly) and after the delayed start up, it seems to function normally (in terms of speed) however, I notice higher temps (51-60 C) doing word/ excel stuff as opposed to 40-45 C earlier.

I have no clue as to what's gone wrong, haven't installed anything new/unknown either. Normally I remove the battery when I get home, cos I do some moderate gaming on it and I don't want the battery to get over heated. This laptop has always given me problems (hangs) whilst going from battery to power and vice versa. (It's a known problem with this hp laptop model I think) I've searched the hp forums, and all their suggestions do not work. However, that problem never persisted after restarting. (Just thought I'd put it out there, in case its of any importance)

So yeah, I'm quite disturbed right now, cos I've been taking pretty good care of the laptop, and I fail to see what could have caused this. As I type the temps have gone up to 60C, and that's disturbing as heck. The warranty has expired on it as well.

Need some suggestions as to what I could do to troubleshoot this.

Thanks for your time!
post #2 of 32
    I'd suspect malfunctioning software, or actual malware using up your CPU cycles, keeping your CPU from going to a lower power state.  Open Task Manager ([Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Delete], then click "Start Task Manager").  In the status bar at the bottom, take a look at the second pane for CPU usage (I've got Vista).  If your computer is idle, 7% or less would be good.  If it's higher then that, click on the "Processes" tab.  Click on the 3rd heading "CPU" to sort the processes running on your computer by CPU usage.  If all the numbers on top are "00" then click the heading again to reverse the sorting order.  "System Idle Process" should be the only thing using a lot of your CPU (95% would be typical).  If there is another process in there using a lot of CPU, post back here and tell us what it is.  Perhaps you may even want to look it up on the Internet.  You might even want to try terminating it.
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post #3 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

    I'd suspect malfunctioning software, or actual malware using up your CPU cycles, keeping your CPU from going to a lower power state.  Open Task Manager ([Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Delete], then click "Start Task Manager").  In the status bar at the bottom, take a look at the second pane for CPU usage (I've got Vista).  If your computer is idle, 7% or less would be good.  If it's higher then that, click on the "Processes" tab.  Click on the 3rd heading "CPU" to sort the processes running on your computer by CPU usage.  If all the numbers on top are "00" then click the heading again to reverse the sorting order.  "System Idle Process" should be the only thing using a lot of your CPU (95% would be typical).  If there is another process in there using a lot of CPU, post back here and tell us what it is.  Perhaps you may even want to look it up on the Internet.  You might even want to try terminating it.

^ This might be a good thing to start with.
Something else you can try is running in safe mode and then check temperatures. If they are also high in safe mode then there is probably a hardware problem. (Maybe CPU heatsink got a little loose -> causes throttling slowing start-up)

And about that battery removing thing. I don't think that's necessary. My laptop is 2 year old, heavily used (probably 5+ hours/day), i always leave the battery in and HW monitor still only shows 4% wear. (It was already at 3% first time i ran HW monitor)
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post #4 of 32
Yeah, what clued me into possible malware is that he said his computer took 8 minutes to boot!
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post #5 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

    I'd suspect malfunctioning software, or actual malware using up your CPU cycles, keeping your CPU from going to a lower power state.  Open Task Manager ([Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Delete], then click "Start Task Manager").  In the status bar at the bottom, take a look at the second pane for CPU usage (I've got Vista).  If your computer is idle, 7% or less would be good.  If it's higher then that, click on the "Processes" tab.  Click on the 3rd heading "CPU" to sort the processes running on your computer by CPU usage.  If all the numbers on top are "00" then click the heading again to reverse the sorting order.  "System Idle Process" should be the only thing using a lot of your CPU (95% would be typical).  If there is another process in there using a lot of CPU, post back here and tell us what it is.  Perhaps you may even want to look it up on the Internet.  You might even want to try terminating it.

But I've already got Kaspersky Pure 2.0 installed, and I did do a complete scan, and vulnerability checks, and it didn't detect anything. Also, regarding the CPU usage, I had checked that too it's idling around 3-5%, so no major processes hogging up CPU usage, and still the hot temps. redface.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sisaroth View Post


^ This might be a good thing to start with.
Something else you can try is running in safe mode and then check temperatures. If they are also high in safe mode then there is probably a hardware problem. (Maybe CPU heatsink got a little loose -> causes throttling slowing start-up)

And about that battery removing thing. I don't think that's necessary. My laptop is 2 year old, heavily used (probably 5+ hours/day), i always leave the battery in and HW monitor still only shows 4% wear. (It was already at 3% first time i ran HW monitor)

I'll have to give that a try, but how do I check my temps in safe mode? Cos I tried with real temps and it didn't start up while in safe mode, gave me some error message. And man, the HW monitor, I just checked and my wear level is 36%! thinking.gif Could've sworn it was nowhere near that bad the last time I checked. I wonder if its all related somehow?

I must add in that, once the laptop does manage to completely start up, it is as fast as its always been. It's just the MAJOR boot time, and the unusual temps that's putting me off.

I have no clue how to troubleshoot this mess now. rolleyes.gif

Edit: I'd also like to add that I've always kept track of all the Start up items via msconfig, and there's no additional entries in there. I even removed a couple, to see if it'd help, but no difference.
Edited by OCcomet - 4/29/13 at 9:11am
post #6 of 32
    Hmm.  The only thing it sounds remotely like to me, is that during boot, the CPU is overheating (did you drop the laptop recently? This could break the thermal compound's contact with the CPU) and is throttling down for thermal protection; however, after booting is complete and the load goes down, it cools sufficiently and goes back to normal speed. Can you run something that would load the CPU (some people use Prime95, but a game or some other process that would use 100% of the CPU would suffice) and see how RealTemp (I would recommend using CoreTemp) responds?  If the temperature jumps up 10–20°C in ~2 seconds, I would suspect bad heatsink contact.  If the temperature gets to 80–90°C, I would terminate the load immediately (and also suspect heatsink problems).  The only other thing I can think of that would cause high CPU temperatures, is if the buck-converter on the motherboard was (for some reason) producing voltages that are too high for the CPU; but you said it was a new laptop, so I would be really surprised if it was that!
    Maybe someone else here has some ideas?
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post #7 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

    Hmm.  The only thing it sounds remotely like to me, is that during boot, the CPU is overheating (did you drop the laptop recently? This could break the thermal compound's contact with the CPU) and is throttling down for thermal protection; however, after booting is complete and the load goes down, it cools sufficiently and goes back to normal speed. Can you run something that would load the CPU (some people use Prime95, but a game or some other process that would use 100% of the CPU would suffice) and see how RealTemp (I would recommend using CoreTemp) responds?  If the temperature jumps up 10–20°C in ~2 seconds, I would suspect bad heatsink contact.  If the temperature gets to 80–90°C, I would terminate the load immediately (and also suspect heatsink problems).  The only other thing I can think of that would cause high CPU temperatures, is if the buck-converter on the motherboard was (for some reason) producing voltages that are too high for the CPU; but you said it was a new laptop, so I would be really surprised if it was that!
    Maybe someone else here has some ideas?

I haven't dropped it ever actually, hmm, gotta test out the load testing. But, what puzzles me is I didn't have any temp issues till the slow start ups.

I'm guessing the only other alternative is to try and format it? :/ Gonna go back up all my data first.
post #8 of 32
Thread Starter 
So I just did a stress test. Ran Prime95 Large FFTs for about 3-4 mins. I maxed out at about 75C. Came back down to mid 50s under a minute after stopping them. Seems reasonable to me?

post #9 of 32
    Yes, the "busy" temperature seems OK (it's a laptop, and I take it that these i5s and i7s can run hot).  My original question was, how fast did the temperature rise?  Did it suddenly jump 10–20°C in <2 seconds, or did it rise smoothly but quickly? i.e. 45 [load turned on] 52 58 63 67 versus 45 [load turned on] 62 70 73 75...
    Just a thought: I don't know why SpeedStep would quit working, but you can check it with HwInfo32.  When you start HwInfo32, it should come up with a simple "monitoring" screen.  It will show the current CPU clock and multiplier.  In normal operation (idling), the "progress bar" that shows the CPU's current performance level (relative to its max) will be hovering somewhere near/above the middle.  Opening programs (and the like) should cause the bar to move higher.  However, if it is always pegged at the max, something is causing SpeedStep not to throttle down.  In that case, I would make sure that your Windows Power Profile is set to "Balanced" not "Maximum Performance."  However, this does not explain your computer taking 8 minutes to boot!
 
Added a link to a screenshot
Edited by Techie007 - 4/29/13 at 12:39pm
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Intel Core i7-3770K Gigabyte P67A-D3-B3 NVIDIA GeForce 8400 GS  1x Corsair 8 GB 
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Kingston SV300S3 WesternDigital WD10EZEX Samsung HD154UI Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64 
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post #10 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

    Yes, the "busy" temperature seems OK (it's a laptop, and I take it that these i5s and i7s can run hot).  My original question was, how fast did the temperature rise?  Did it suddenly jump 10–20°C in <2 seconds, or did it rise smoothly but quickly? i.e. 45 [load turned on] 52 58 63 67 versus 45 [load turned on] 62 70 73 75...
    Just a thought: I don't know why SpeedStep would quit working, but you can check it with HwInfo32.  When you start HwInfo32, it should come up with a simple "monitoring" screen.  It will show the current CPU clock and multiplier.  In normal operation (idling), the "progress bar" that shows the CPU's current performance level (relative to its max) will be hovering somewhere near/above the middle.  Opening programs (and the like) should cause the bar to move higher.  However, if it is always pegged at the max, something is causing SpeedStep not to throttle down.  In that case, I would make sure that your Windows Power Profile is set to "Balanced" not "Maximum Performance."  However, this does not explain your computer taking 8 minutes to boot!
 
Added a link to a screenshot


Here's what HWinfo has to say:



Hmm, I can't recall how quickly the temps rose up. Heading to sleep now, but will check once again after work tomorrow.
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