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The Big Dive with Caselabs TX10-V - Page 3

post #21 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiGiCiDAL View Post

So a question looking at the rear of your case, it appears that there is a 1U 19" RM slot between the PSU mount sections and the motherboard divider plate. Is this unobstructed in the case on the PSU side? I realize that I'm unlikely to ever decide that I need a TX10 in addition to my M8, but that's really interesting. I knew you could get multiple RM slots in a top configuration but never really looked at the TX10-V (always the 'D') so didn't realize there was another possibility.

Thinking that would make one heck of a monster media server case - with 16 port switch built right in... biggrin.gif
 

Yes, it is unobstructed unless you buy the optional PSU support which juts into the space a little bit. I have two of those support for my dual PSUs. That little corner is another option for hiding cables in addition to the 4" space between the motherboard side and the PSU side of the case.

 

"I'm gonna speculate it will be your last build as well." ... I'm tempted to say that, but I'll probably end up like you with multiple builds; but I do not anticipate that "multiple" would mean very many for me. I'm devoting effort to make this one a good build and merely upgrade it as necessary. In terms of time, effort, and thinking, these builds really are challenging, not to mention cost. But I absolutely love it and I'm happy I started the project. I do not consider myself the ignoramus I used to be with respect to computers anymore. I've learnt quite a bit.

post #22 of 63
Well, regardless, you picked the right case for the first - whether it's also the last or not. I really wish I had just bitten the bullet and gone for the TX10 myself... but having a second floor home office (while wanting to move it into what was 'supposed to be my office' downstairs at some point in time) caused me to chicken out. However, now that I've decided to add a pedestal to my M8 - I'm >75% of the cost and size of a TX10 while still not coming close to the cooling and hardware capacity. Ah well, live and learn. biggrin.gif
post #23 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiGiCiDAL View Post

Well, regardless, you picked the right case for the first - whether it's also the last or not. I really wish I had just bitten the bullet and gone for the TX10 myself... but having a second floor home office (while wanting to move it into what was 'supposed to be my office' downstairs at some point in time) caused me to chicken out. However, now that I've decided to add a pedestal to my M8 - I'm >75% of the cost and size of a TX10 while still not coming close to the cooling and hardware capacity. Ah well, live and learn. biggrin.gif

Thanks. You know these things are not the cheapest things in the world. So, I wanted to get one that I would really like the first time. It's working out right. It's just so roomy. My problem is not space, but deciding what to do with the space. I'm glad that's the problem I have rather than needing space and not having it. The build is not near complete, but you can't tell that I already have 53 fans in it (36 on my radiators, 10 in the top data chamber, 2 in the motherboard side, and 5 straddling the front - in the flex-bays). I might add an optional 2 more in the PSU side. My cooling loop involves about 16 feet of tubing, aside from the other cooling components. 2 pumps attached to 2 reserviors, 2 MO-RA3 Pros, two fan controllers (all my fans are attached via splitters to the controllers), 2 optical drives, 3 x 3TB seagate hard drives, 1 512GB Samsung SSD, etc. . . . and yet there is still so much room. I'm really pleased.

 

Yes, if your office is upstairs, the TX10 is not an option unless you have an elevator or a crane to move the case!


Edited by Choice - 5/24/13 at 4:24pm
post #24 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Choice View Post

Yes, if your office is upstairs, the TX10 is not an option unless you have an elevator or a crane to move the case!

Yeah, that's kind of how my thinking went... not that moving an M8+Ped is going to be a simple matter either - but it's definitely possible (especially if disassembled). Plus having carpet upstairs as opposed to hard floors like downstairs - something that size wouldn't even be too terribly easy to just roll around the room itself. But I do think I will be buying one at some point in time... just not necessarily in this house. smile.gif
post #25 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiGiCiDAL View Post


Yeah, that's kind of how my thinking went... not that moving an M8+Ped is going to be a simple matter either - but it's definitely possible (especially if disassembled). Plus having carpet upstairs as opposed to hard floors like downstairs - something that size wouldn't even be too terribly easy to just roll around the room itself. But I do think I will be buying one at some point in time... just not necessarily in this house. smile.gif

The more I look at the case, the more I'm loving it. And BTW, I misled you when I said the optional PSU support juts into the space behind the 1U 19" RM. It doesn't at all. I've re-checked it. And just because you mentioned it, I've begun to think about installing a rack mount surge protector there. Initially, I wanted to mount one inside the case - maybe in the PSU side or in an open space in the lower chambers. But now I have another option. Thanks.


Edited by Choice - 5/25/13 at 3:24pm
post #26 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Choice View Post

The more I look at the case, the more I'm loving it. And BTW, I misled you when I said the optional PSU support juts into the space behind the 1U 19" RM. It doesn't at all. I've re-checked it. And just because you mentioned it, I've begun to think about installing a rack mount surge protector there. Initially, I wanted to mount one inside the case - maybe in the PSU side or in an open space in the lower chambers. But now I have another option. Thanks.

REP+ for checking that for me... I was a little surprised that Jim would have missed something like that... not surprised to know he didn't! biggrin.gif That's got to be one of the coolest 'non-essential' features of the TX10... how many other PC cases can claim to have 19" Rackspace included? thumbsupsmiley.png
post #27 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiGiCiDAL View Post

Well, regardless, you picked the right case for the first - whether it's also the last or not. I really wish I had just bitten the bullet and gone for the TX10 myself... but having a second floor home office (while wanting to move it into what was 'supposed to be my office' downstairs at some point in time) caused me to chicken out. However, now that I've decided to add a pedestal to my M8 - I'm >75% of the cost and size of a TX10 while still not coming close to the cooling and hardware capacity. Ah well, live and learn. biggrin.gif

Yeah, that is a good addition by Jim. I'm having difficulty, though, finding the exact type of 19" RM I would like. I've been looking around the internet to find one with at least 6 ethernet ports and at least 4 surge protector ports for my PSUs and access point. The ones I've found have either only ethernet ports or surge protector ports.

post #28 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Choice View Post

Yeah, that is a good addition by Jim. I'm having difficulty, though, finding the exact type of 19" RM I would like. I've been looking around the internet to find one with at least 6 ethernet ports and at least 4 surge protector ports for my PSUs and access point. The ones I've found have either only ethernet ports or surge protector ports.

Well, as a recommendation (and explanation since there's a reason you can't fine something like that) just leave the surge suppression to an external strip/ups and put the network switch in the case. In general surge suppressors work somewhat like filters and somewhat like fuses - i.e. they're designed to be 'consumed' first if there's a surge large enough to exceed the dissipation/capacitor capability of it. Although this is great (especially when it saves the equipment attached to it) many of them are pretty 'noisy' as well and are much more likely to affect sensitive equipment that's very close to them (like high speed clocks - such as those used in computers).

Good ones are shielded as well, so they don't really affect anything other than their own internal environment (inside the shielding itself) - however, if you were to put a CPU or other high-speed, high-precision clock INSIDE the actual shielded chassis... that might indeed affect them negatively. That's why designers (well good ones at least) try to put as much distance between power and the sensitive components that are using that power (usually the power connection is all the way to one side and the circuitry is all the way to the opposite side).

So the recommendation is... just get a switch for your RM slot - and for ease of configuration, if you can find one with the IEC outlet on the front along with the ports... that would be perfect... however, those are hard to find as well for the exact same reasons (Since all your data cables and power cables would be on the same side of the rack if they were made that way). wink.gif
post #29 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiGiCiDAL View Post


Well, as a recommendation (and explanation since there's a reason you can't fine something like that) just leave the surge suppression to an external strip/ups and put the network switch in the case. In general surge suppressors work somewhat like filters and somewhat like fuses - i.e. they're designed to be 'consumed' first if there's a surge large enough to exceed the dissipation/capacitor capability of it. Although this is great (especially when it saves the equipment attached to it) many of them are pretty 'noisy' as well and are much more likely to affect sensitive equipment that's very close to them (like high speed clocks - such as those used in computers).

Good ones are shielded as well, so they don't really affect anything other than their own internal environment (inside the shielding itself) - however, if you were to put a CPU or other high-speed, high-precision clock INSIDE the actual shielded chassis... that might indeed affect them negatively. That's why designers (well good ones at least) try to put as much distance between power and the sensitive components that are using that power (usually the power connection is all the way to one side and the circuitry is all the way to the opposite side).

So the recommendation is... just get a switch for your RM slot - and for ease of configuration, if you can find one with the IEC outlet on the front along with the ports... that would be perfect... however, those are hard to find as well for the exact same reasons (Since all your data cables and power cables would be on the same side of the rack if they were made that way). wink.gif

That's a load of useful counsel to consider. Thanks a bunch. I was actually looking for a combo with external port, but one that is somewhat mod-able. I might just settle for the switch. I was shooting for a configuration such that just one power cable goes from the computer to the wall A/C socket while such items as my PSUs and access points plug into the case-mounted surge protector. Now, if I'm going to retain that idea, then and externally mounted surge protector would be the way to go.

 

PS: I decided to just leave everything as they are presently. My ethernet switch is external (not mounted in/on the case) and so is my surge protector. I think I can live with them in the present arrangement - gives me more room in the case and the case doesn't appear "overcrowded."


Edited by Choice - 5/28/13 at 10:10am
post #30 of 63
Thread Starter 

Ok. At this stage, I can say I'm pretty much done with phase 1 of the project. My cooling loop is complete and the computer is up and running.

 

 

 

I have attemted to keep the PC as spacious as possible even with all my hardware installed. I tried to avoid tubings running here and there and making the computer look unnecessarily busy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have two sets of Bitspower QDC installed at the entry into the motherboard mosfet and at the exit from the GPUs. That way, it is easier for me to remove the motherboard tray should I need to. As this is a work in progress, I believe I will be doing that a lot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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